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I am having a sorting issue with oracle 10g. Not sure if it is specific to 10g or not.

I have the following table:

ID  NAME
 1  A.1
 2  A.3
 3  A.4
 4  A.5
 5  A.2
 6  A.5.1
 7  A.5.2
 8  A.5.10
 9  A.5.10.1
10  A.5.3

Performing the generic SELECT NAME FROM table_name ORDER BY 1 produces:

A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.5.1
A.5.10
A.5.10.1
A.5.2
A.5.3

I would like it to sort correctly when those sections have numbers greater than 9, like so:

A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.5.1
A.5.2
A.5.3
A.5.10
A.5.10.1

I have way more number entries than this with varying lengths and many sections with number segments greater than 10. I was trying to mess around with regexp_replace() in the order by clause but have had no luck. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this

WITH t AS
(
  SELECT id,name,
  xmltype('<r><c>' ||replace(NAME, '.', '</c><c>')||'</c></r>') AS xmlname
  FROM table1
)

SELECT name ,id
FROM t
ORDER BY lpad(extract(xmlname,'//c[1]/text()').getstringval(), 5, '0')
||lpad(extract(xmlname,'//c[2]/text()').getstringval(), 5, '0')
||lpad(extract(xmlname,'//c[3]/text()').getstringval(), 5, '0')
||lpad(extract(xmlname,'//c[4]/text()').getstringval(), 5, '0')

Here is a fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
That definitely works. Can you explain what is happening? Also that is a hefty query taking a lot of time to generate. Is that because of the With/Replace or the concatenation in the ORDER BY? Thank You. – Gabe Ortiz Sep 25 '12 at 12:32
    
First it makes it an xml (not really needed, can be done with substr and instr as well - actually this may cost in performence). then it takes every node (a part between dots) and pads it with zeroes to be of a high length (lets say 5). now it can be sorted – A.B.Cade Sep 27 '12 at 22:09

My question was actually answered in another post that I posted for a similar but unrelated issue.

Oracle SQL doesn't support lookaround assertions, which would be useful for this case:

s/([0-9](?<![0-9]))/0\1/g

You'll have to use at least two replacements:

REGEXP_REPLACE(REGEXP_REPLACE(col, '([0-9]+)', '0\1'), '0([0-9]{2})', '\1')`

Thanks to acheong87 for the solution. Oracle SQL Regexp_replace matching

share|improve this answer

Using regex can solve your problem ,

select *
from new_table
  order by to_number(regexp_replace(name,'[[:alpha:].]*'));

What this query means that I'm replacing the alpha characters + the '.' character from the column NAME , coverting to number and then sorting.

I hope this was helpful , enjoy !

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldnt this solution sort A.5.11 before A.5.10.1 – Luke101 Sep 25 '12 at 16:38
    
That sort of works, but sorts them according to length of the string first and then in the correct order. – Gabe Ortiz Sep 25 '12 at 16:57

Here's a way to do it. I'm not saying this is the only or even the best way, but it is A way:

SELECT ID,
       NAME
FROM
  (SELECT ID, NAME,
       INSTR(NAME, '.', 1, 1) AS FIRST_DOT_INDEX,
       INSTR(NAME, '.', 1, 2) AS SECOND_DOT_INDEX,
       INSTR(NAME, '.', 1, 3) AS THIRD_DOT_INDEX,
       INSTR(NAME, '.', 1, 4) AS FOURTH_DOT_INDEX
     FROM test_table)
ORDER BY SUBSTR(NAME, 1, FIRST_DOT_INDEX-1),
         TO_NUMBER(SUBSTR(NAME, FIRST_DOT_INDEX+1, (CASE WHEN SECOND_DOT_INDEX>0
                                                      THEN SECOND_DOT_INDEX-1
                                                      ELSE LENGTH(NAME)
                                                    END - FIRST_DOT_INDEX))),
         TO_NUMBER(CASE WHEN SECOND_DOT_INDEX = 0 AND THIRD_DOT_INDEX = 0
                     THEN '0'
                     ELSE SUBSTR(NAME, SECOND_DOT_INDEX+1, (CASE WHEN THIRD_DOT_INDEX>0
                                                              THEN THIRD_DOT_INDEX-1
                                                              ELSE LENGTH(NAME)
                                                            END - SECOND_DOT_INDEX)) 
                   END),
         TO_NUMBER(CASE WHEN THIRD_DOT_INDEX > 0
                     THEN SUBSTR(NAME, THIRD_DOT_INDEX+1, LENGTH(NAME) - THIRD_DOT_INDEX)
                     ELSE '0'
                   END);

Share and enjoy.

share|improve this answer
    
Will this account for the fact that I have varying lengths of characters and DOT sections? – Gabe Ortiz Sep 25 '12 at 12:32

The following may give you an idea of what to do. To order values of the form "A.", you can order by the length of the expression followed by the expression. So, A.1 and A.2 are before A.10, because their length is shorter.

You can expand this, with an order by as follows:

order by substr(val, 1, instr('.')),
         len(substr(val, 1, instr('.', 1, 2)),
         substr(val, 1, instr('.', 1, 2)),
         len(substr(val, 1, instr('.', 1, 3)),
         substr(val, 1, instr('.', 1, 3)) . . .
share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure that I follow the code logic. Is there a parenthesis missing or are the subsequent substr, len, substr within the first len statement? – Gabe Ortiz Sep 25 '12 at 13:17
    
This is a pretty good solution but it only handles a limited amount of dots. – Luke101 Sep 25 '12 at 16:49
    
@Luke101 . . . The purpose of the ". . ." is to indicate that the code can be extended using the same structure as the other lines. – Gordon Linoff Sep 25 '12 at 18:28

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