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I need to use a Dictionary, where TKey is a pair of ints.

I thought of using KeyValuePair for the type of my keys and I was wondering if this was the best way around.

I'm also curious to know if the Dictionary will create separate entries for two different KeyValuePair objects with the same ints and why.

For instance:

var myDictionary = new Dictionary<KeyValuePair<int,int>, string>();
myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(3, 3), "FirstItem");
myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(3, 3), "SecondItem");
// does the dictionary allow this?
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Why don't you have tried? –  Cuong Le Sep 24 '12 at 18:10
1  
@Cuong Le: Because I want to know why more than the resulting behavior. –  asmo Sep 24 '12 at 18:11
1  
-1 If you know it will produce a run time error then why are you asking "curious to know if the Dictionary will create separate entries for two different KeyValuePair objects with the same ints" –  Blam Sep 24 '12 at 18:28
3  
@code4life: KeyValuePair does not implement Equals so it uses the default struct Equals, which works as expected in this case. –  Guvante Sep 24 '12 at 18:57
1  
@code4life: ValueType has a useful default implementation of Equals, so all simple struct values have built in Equals. –  Guvante Sep 24 '12 at 20:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Maybe you should consider using a Tuple

var myDictionary = new Dictionary<Tuple<int,int>, List<string>>(); 
myDictionary.Add(new Tuple<int,int>(3, 3), "FirstItem"); 
myDictionary.Add(new Tuple<int,int>(5, 5), "SecondItem"); 

According to MSDN documentation, a Tuple objects Equals method will use the values of the two Tuple objects. This would result in one entry per Tuple in the outer dictionary and allow you to store a listing of the values per key.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I meant two times the same (3,3) couple in my question, otherwise it loses its meaning. You should update your answer too. –  asmo Sep 24 '12 at 18:13
    
What is different that using KeyValuePair? You would exactly get the same behaviour. –  L.B Sep 24 '12 at 18:14
    
@asmo: please see my update. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 24 '12 at 18:15
    
@L.B: please see my update. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 24 '12 at 18:16
1  
Tested Tuple, KVP, and Int64 (my answer). On a grid of 1000, 1000. Loaded the dictionary and the did a lookup on each. And the winner is Tuple! Followed by Int64 and KVP dead last. The ratio was about 1:5:15. Most machines don't have enough memory for Int32 X Int32. –  Blam Sep 24 '12 at 20:31

For performance Dictionary requires a key that generates unique GetHashValue.

KeyValuePair is a value type and not recommended for a key.

ValueType.GetHashCode

If you call the derived type's GetHashCode method, the return value is not likely to be suitable for use as a key in a hash table. Additionally, if the value of one or more of those fields changes, the return value might become unsuitable for use as a key in a hash table. In either case, consider writing your own implementation of the GetHashCode method that more closely represents the concept of a hash code for the type.

Point is also a value value type and also not recommended for a key.
Tuple also generates a lot of duplicate GetHashCode and is not a good key.

The optimal key is one that generates unique keys.

Consider UInt16 i and UInt j as the two keys.
How can they be combined and generate unique hash?
Easy combine them into and UInt32.
UInt32 natively generates a perfect hash.

The alogorithm for packing two UInt16 into UInt32 is

(i * (UInt16.MaxValue + 1)) + j;

but it is even faster with

(UInt32)i << 16 | j;

myDictionary = new Dictionary<UInt32, string>();

With a perfect hash the Dictionary is O(1).
With a poor hash the Dictionary becomes O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
I read that documentation, but how do you conclude KeyValuePair/Point are value types and not recommended for a key.? –  nawfal Jun 4 '13 at 19:40
    
@Nawfal The quote in the answer directly answers that question –  bacar Aug 5 '13 at 23:36
    
@bacar which quote? or which part of it? I'm not able to follow.. –  nawfal Aug 5 '13 at 23:40
    
"If you call the derived type's GetHashCode method, the return value is not likely to be suitable for use as a key in a hash table". I think the wording is fuzzy - I think it does mean that the derived type itself is not suitable as a key. –  bacar Aug 5 '13 at 23:48
    
Using a value-type as a key is perfectly appropriate if the value type overrides GetHashCode and Equals, and if it implements IEquatable<itsOwnType>. A custom integer-pair value type could outperform a Tuple class type in the vast majority of usage scenarios, sometimes by a large margin. –  supercat Dec 10 '13 at 18:02

UPDATE: Based on your comments to other responders, the code below answers your questions. Yes, duplicates will generate an exception, System.ArgumentException

The code you listed will work, but will not accept duplicate KeyValuePairs. System.ArgumentException or similar will be thrown if you add KeyValuePair that already exists in the dictionary.

For example, this code

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace test{

    public class App {

        public static void Main(string[] args) {
            var myDictionary = new Dictionary<KeyValuePair<int,int>, string>(); 

            Console.WriteLine("Adding 2 items...");
            myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(3, 3), "FirstItem"); 
            myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(5, 5), "SecondItem"); 
            Console.WriteLine("Dictionary items: {0}", myDictionary.Count);

            Console.WriteLine("Adding 2 duplicate items...");
            myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(3, 3), "FirstItem"); 
            myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(5, 5), "SecondItem"); 
            Console.WriteLine("Dictionary items: {0}", myDictionary.Count);
        }
    }
}

gives the following

Microsoft (R) Visual C# Compiler version 4.0.30319.17626 for Microsoft (R) .NET Framework 4.5 Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Adding 2 items... Dictionary items: 2 Adding 2 duplicate items...

Unhandled Exception: System.ArgumentException: An item with the same key has already been added. at System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary`2.Insert(TKey key, TValue value, Boolean add) at test.App.Main(String[] args)

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Dictionary requires an equality implementation to determine whether keys are equal. You can specify an implementation of the IEqualityComparer<T> generic interface by using a constructor that accepts a comparer parameter; if you do not specify an implementation, the default generic equality comparer EqualityComparer<T>.Default is used.

So, in your case because you don't specify IEqualityComparer<T>, Default will be used.

The EqualityComparer<T>.Default checks whether type T implements the System.IEquatable<T> interface and, if so, returns an EqualityComparer that uses that implementation. Otherwise, it returns an EqualityComparer<T> that uses the overrides of Object.Equals and Object.GetHashCode provided by T.

T is struct KeyValuePair does not implement System.IEquatable<T>, so it uses Equal and GetHashCode method of struct KeyValuePair. These two methods use both Key and Value to check equal and generate hash code:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return Key.GetHashCode() ^ Value.GetHashCode();
}

So, to sum up, in your sample Dictionary does not allow.

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Using KeyValuePair as the key for your dictionary:

It will functionally work to use a KeyValuePair as the key in a dictionary; however, conceptually probably not the best choice for your application as it implies the Key-Value relationship between the two ints.

Instead as Mike suggests you should use Tuple for your key.

For the second question:

var myDictionary = new Dictionary<KeyValuePair<int,int>, string>();  
myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(3, 3), "FirstItem");  
myDictionary.Add(new KeyValuePair<int,int>(3, 3), "SecondItem");  
// does the dictionary allow this?  

The dictionary will not allow this, dictionaries themselves are sets of key-value pairs where the keys must be unique. If you want to be able to map mulitple values to the same key, one option would be to have the value be another collection:

var myDictionary = new Dictionary<KeyValuePair<int,int>, List<string>>();  

but then you would still not be able to use myDictionary.Add as in your example. instead you would have to provide additional functionality to determine if they key were part of the dictionary and act accordingly:

public static class DictionaryHelper
{

    public static void Add(this Dictionary<Tuple<int,int>, List<string>> dict,Tuple<int,int> key, string value)
    {
        if(dict.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            dict[key].Add(value);
        }
        else
        {
            dict.Add(key, new List<string>{value});
        }
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Mr.Mindor Sep 4 '13 at 16:29

Simply use a long as key and combine the two int keys

public class IntIntDict<T> : Dictionary<long, T>
{
    public void Add(int key1, int key2, T value)
    {
        Add((((long)key1) << 32) + key2, value);
    }

    //TODO: Overload other methods
}
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