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I am having a problem with my python school assignment and I can't figure out what I am doing wrong. I either get a global name not defined or if I change things around I get different sythax errors. I am hoping that someone will be able to assist me in what I am doing wrong.

Here is a image of the assignment details: enter image description here

def main():
  x = int(input("Give me integer #1: "))
  y = int(input("Give me integer #2: "))
  z = input("Give me a string: ")
  print("min:",min(x,y))
  print("max:",max(x,y))
  print("equal:",equal(x,y))
  print("is_even:",is_even(x))
  print("is_odd:",is_odd(x))
  print("format_dollar:",format_dollar(x))
  print("lab_grade:",lab_grade(x))
  print("is_unlucky:",is_unlucky(x))
  print("is_lucky:",is_lucky(x))
  print("pluralize:",pluralize(z)) 


#1 This function will figure out the min of 2 integer arguments and return the smaller one
def min(num1,num2):
    if num1 >= num2: return num1
    else: return num2

#2 This function will figure out the max of 2 integer arguments and return the smaller one
def max(num1,num2):
    if num1 <= num2: return num1
    else: return num2

#3 This function will figure out if the 2 numbers are equal
def equal(x,y):
    if x == y: True
    else: False

#4 This function will find out if the number is even
def is_even(num1,num2):
    is_even = x
    if x % 2 == 0: return ("True")
    else: return ("False")

#5 This function will find out if the number is odd
def is_odd(num1,num2):
    is_odd = x
    if x % 2 == 1: return ("True")
    else: return even

#6 This function will format the returned string
def format_dollar(num1,num2):
    x**('.2f')

#7 This function will fin out a lab grade
def lab_grade(x):
    lab_grade = int(raw_input("Enter the student's grade: "))
    if grade >= 90:
        return 'A'
    if grade >= 80:
        return 'B'
    if grade >= 70:

       return 'C'
    if grade >= 60:
        return 'D'
    else:
        return 'F'
#8 This will determine if the function is un_lucky
def is_unlucky(x):
    if x == 4:
        return ('True')
    if x == 13:
        return ('True')
    if x == 7:
        return ('True')
    else: ('False')
    print()


#9 This will determine if the function is lucky
def is_lucky(x):
    if x == 3:
        return ('True')
    if x == 4:
        return ('True')
    if x == 8:
        return ('True')
    if x == 7:
        return ('True')
    else:
        return ('False')


    print('')

#10 This function will pluralize
def pluralize(z):
    if not z:
        return plural
    print('')
main()
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closed as not a real question by Eric, tripleee, Ashwini Chaudhary, DSM, ЯegDwight Sep 24 '12 at 22:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
For one thing, you have functions trying to use a variable named x when they take parameters num1 and num2, but that's a lot of badly-formatted code to expect someone to go through. –  Wooble Sep 24 '12 at 18:13
    
What is your question? –  BrenBarn Sep 24 '12 at 18:13
    
fix your indentation. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 24 '12 at 18:20
    
One error is that in main(), you're trying to call functions that haven't been declared yet. You should declare functions before calling them, so all those print statements should go below the function definitions. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 24 '12 at 18:26
1  
@Ashwini Chaudhary: It's OK to call functions in a function definition that haven't been defined yet. –  martineau Sep 24 '12 at 18:28

3 Answers 3

Your is_even() and is_odd() functions look evenly-odd..

Well, that was just a joke.. Sorry.. But you are taking two different parameters num1, and num2 whereas you are using a variable x getting assigned to an unknown variable is_even which I don't understand what is doing there??

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change even from:

def is_even(num1,num2):
    is_even = x
    if x % 2 == 0: return ("True")
    else: return ("False")

to:

def is_even(num1):
    if num1 % 2 == 0: 
        return ("True")
    else: 
        return ("False")

why?:

  • You only need one input
  • you shouldn't use the global x
  • you shouldn't set is_even, a function, to a value.

is odd and format_dollar suffer from similar problems.

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Thank you for that! Now I have a few less things to worry about but I am still getting my global variable error. Can you see a reason why? Thanks :) –  Taylor Sand Sep 24 '12 at 20:26

If I had to guess, I'd say that what you did was write all 10 functions at one sitting then fired the whole mess up to see if it worked. After the first half hour of banging your head against it you probably got to the point where you were just randomly changing things to see if by a miracle the smoke would clear.

Since this appears to be a very basic assignment I'll refrain from suggesting things like using test driven development, but you could make your life much easier by taking a more incremental approach.

First off start with your main and get it running so that all your function calls work without generating errors, something like:

def main():
    x = int(input("Give me integer #1: "))
    y = int(input("Give me integer #2: "))
    z = input("Give me a string: ")
    print("min:", min(x, y))
    print("max:", max(x, y))
    print("equal:", equal(x, y))
    print("is_even:", is_even(x))
    print("is_odd:", is_odd(x))
    print("format_dollar:", format_dollar(x))
    print("lab_grade:", lab_grade(x))
    print("is_unlucky:", is_unlucky(x))
    print("is_lucky:", is_lucky(x))
    print("pluralize:", pluralize(z))

def min(x, y):
    return x

def max(x, y):
    return x

# Fill in all the other functions here in the same fashion.

main()

Do the same for all the functions, just return the first parameter passed in. Once you get it so that your code runs without generating any errors. Go function by function fixing each one to return the correct results. A trick to make your life even easier is to hack main() (just for testing) to be:

def main():
    #x = int(input("Give me integer #1: "))
    #y = int(input("Give me integer #2: "))
    #z = input("Give me a string: ")
    x = 5
    y = 8
    z = 'foobar'

    print("min:", min(x, y))
    print("max:", max(x, y))
    print("equal:", equal(x, y))
    print("is_even:", is_even(x))
    print("is_odd:", is_odd(x))
    print("format_dollar:", format_dollar(x))
    print("lab_grade:", lab_grade(x))
    print("is_unlucky:", is_unlucky(x))
    print("is_lucky:", is_lucky(x))
    print("pluralize:", pluralize(z))

This way you can run your program quickly without having to enter input each time. Once you get it working well, you can then remove the comments from in front of the inputs and remove your hard-coded values and turn it in with main() unchanged.

When returning True/False, you should use the actual Boolean values True and False, not their string representations. Also as the assignment specifically called out elif, you should probably use if/elif/else statements rather than a bunch of discreet ifs as your code had.

#9 This will determine if the function is lucky
#  x = number to test
# returns True if number is lucky, else False
def is_lucky(x):
    if x == 3:
        return True
    elif x == 4:
        return True
    elif x == 8:
        return True
    elif x == 7:
        return True
    else:
        return False
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