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I'm starting to use exceptions and to handle more precisely some events or errors, I created my own type of exceptions derived from std::exception. So far everything went well but I've just noticed that sometimes the method what() does not print anything. The exception is well thrown and caught, but the explanation message print normally by the method what() does not always show on screen. It can happen with the same parameters as the previous execution which ended printing the message and seems to be completely random.

Here's my exceptions :

class MyException : public std::exception
{
    public:
        MyException() throw() {}
        ~MyException() throw() {}
        virtual const char *what() const throw()
        {
            return "general exception\n";
        }
};

class FileError : public MyException
{
    public:
        FileError(std::string nFileName) : MyException(), fileName(nFileName) { }
        ~FileError() throw (){ }
        virtual const char *what()
        {
            std::ostringstream oss;
            oss << "Error with file : \"" << fileName << "\"." << std::endl;
            return (oss.str()).c_str();
        }
    protected:
        std::string fileName; 
};

and the context which cause me problem :

try
{
    QFile sourceFile(sourceFileName);
    if(!sourceFile.open(QIODevice::ReadOnly))
        throw FileError(sourceFileName.toStdString());
    sourceFile.close();
}
catch(FileError &e)
{
    std::cout << "error file catch " << std::endl;
    std::cout << e.what();
    terminate();
}

"error file catch" is always print but "Error with file..." sometimes. Any idea what I'm doing wrong ? Thanks

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Note: what() should be noexcept, that is, it must not throw. By leaving the construction of the string to the what function you are allowing the possibility of an exception (while allocating memory), and that in turn could call terminate() before it returns the const char* –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 24 '12 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are returning a pointer to the contents of a temporary std::string.

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Something tells me that both Dave S's problem, and what you're highlighting are both problems with the above code. –  Kevin Anderson Sep 24 '12 at 20:24
    
Yes that was the problem. Adding a string member to my custom class and returning that string in what() fixed my issue –  Ote Sep 24 '12 at 21:07

You aren't flushing std::cout prior to calling terminate (assuming that is std::terminate). I would recommend using std::endl (which is a newline and a flush) at the point where it's output, and not inside FileError::what()

catch(FileError &e)
{
    std::cout << "error file catch " << std::endl;
    std::cout << e.what() << std::endl;
    terminate();
}

Also, as pointed out by @Yuri Kilocheck, you're returning a pointer to a temporary string, invoking UB. The usual solution is to have a string member that is built when what() is executed (if there is a failure building the string, return some pre-defined version).

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