Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
<html>
  <head>
    <title></title>
  <script type="text/javascript">  
    var a = 1;
function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;
    function a() {}
}

</script>
  </head>
  <body>
<script type="text/javascript">
b();
alert(a);
</script>
  </body>
</html>

I am coming from c and java background . Scoping rule is different in java script. I want to know why this program is giving output 1. How this program is working.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Florent, John Watts, kapa, vzwick, Lucifer Sep 25 '12 at 12:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
stackoverflow.com/questions/327454/… –  RASG Sep 24 '12 at 18:42
4  
*** The explanation for that code can be found on the same page the sample code came from ** adequatelygood.com/2010/2/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting If there is a specific question not covered on that page, go ahead and ask here. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 24 '12 at 18:47
    
@JeremyJStarcher, now this is funny ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 24 '12 at 18:49
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a combination of two things going on here; the scope of variables, and how functions and variables are declared inside a function.

You are declaring a local function inside the b function named a, so that has the same effect as declaring a local variable inside the function that shadows the variable by the same name in the global scope.

It doesn't matter where you create a local variable/function inside a function, it will still be created before the code in the function starts, so doing this:

function b() {
  a = 10;
  return;
  function a() {}
}

is basically the same as:

function b() {
  var a = function(){};
  a = 10;
  return;
}

When the code in the function assigns the value 10 to the variable a, it actually overwrites the local function and replaces it with the number. As function references in Javascript are first class members, they can be passed around like any other value, and also replaced by any other value.

As the code in the function only changes the local variable a the global variable a is unchanged.

share|improve this answer
add comment

JavaScript uses function scope. Also, functions are "hoisted" to the top of their scope (the closest function).

function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;
    function a() {}
}

This is being interpreted as:

function b() {
    function a() {}  // function was hoisted
    a = 10;
    return;
}

When a function is declared using function a(){} it's like there was a var there; it's making a local variable. Therefore, the a=10 is the local a, not the global a.

Reference: http://www.adequatelygood.com/2010/2/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting

share|improve this answer
1  
One can also illustrate it as var a=function(){}; in b(). –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 24 '12 at 18:44
add comment

In javascript scoping unit is a function. In your b function, a is a local function. Therefore, global a variable is unaffected.

share|improve this answer
add comment

About scoping in Javascript language, you can find here: http://www.adequatelygood.com/2010/2/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.