Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Example:

$ cat m1.py
a = 1
def f():
    print a

$ cat m2.py 
from m1 import f
a = 2
f()

I want python m2.py to print 2 when I run it, but it prints 1.

Do I have to make f take a as an argument or is there a better way of achieving this? I'm trying to code DRY and reuse the same function in a different "environment" this way. It would make sense to define a inside f, as well, if I could override it upon importing.

Another way I thought of is:

$ cat m1.py
a = 1
def make_f(a):
    def f():
        print a
    return f

f = make_f(a)

$ cat m2.py 
from m1 import make_f
a = 2
f = make_f(a)
f()

This works as needed, but are there more concise ways?

Edit: Thanks for the answers so far; I don't think I can clarify anything by providing a more realistic example, but I'd say that the reason why I'm even asking this is because in my mind there is a distinction between the actual arguments of f (which it would use the same way in both modules) and the "environment" a, which should differ. May be I shouldn't really distinguish (judging by the need to use different values of a in different modules) but the distinction makes sense based on the meaning a bears.

Edit 2: I gave it another thought and concluded that I probably want to use a closure, the reason being that I don't want other functions in each module to have to supply a when calling f. This is, I guess, the observable, non-virtual distinction that is there.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

(If I understand you properly) -- Try this:

#m2.py
from m1 import f
import m1
m1.a = 2
f()

However, I should mention that the very fact that you need to do this throws off all sorts of bells and whistles in my head -- This seems like a very bad design.

share|improve this answer
    
What would be good design then? Is the second way I posted also bad? Could you please elaborate, because I care about writing good code. And yes, you understand me properly. –  Lev Levitsky Sep 24 '12 at 19:17
    
It seems to me that the environment that calls a function shouldn't effect the functions behavior. That violates encapsulation. If your function does need to react to the calling environment, I might pass in a dictionary which describes the environment or something. However, with this very limited example, it's difficult to know what you're really trying to achieve. –  mgilson Sep 24 '12 at 19:20
2  
@LevLevitsky In general, if you want to parametrize a function, add a parameter. Your example is quite abstract, but it seems the sanest approach in any case. Closures are useful, but rarely so, and usually only if you pass the closure around. –  delnan Sep 24 '12 at 19:20
    
@delnan -- Nicely stated. –  mgilson Sep 24 '12 at 19:22
    
@mgilson I've tried to provide some context (not of the code, though, but rather of my thoughts about it), but I feel like it won't change your answer much. –  Lev Levitsky Sep 24 '12 at 19:33

I'd imagine that your code is more complex than this example, so I'd recommend that you try using a class:

YourClass.py

class YourClass(object):
    def __init__(self, a=1):
        self.a = a

    def f(self):
        print self.a

YourOtherFile.py

from YourClass import YourClass

o = YourClass(a=2)  # Without explicitly setting `a=2`, `a` defaults to `1`
o.f()

Without much more context, I can't offer any more advice.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, a class with only one method besides __init__ shouldn't be a class. See Stop Writing Classes. –  delnan Sep 24 '12 at 19:22
    
@delnan: I don't think m1.py contains just one function named f. But then again, without seeing the full picture, I'm just making assumptions. –  Blender Sep 24 '12 at 19:24
    
Yeah, I'm not necessarily disagreeing, just wanted to point that out. Preventing a class that isn't is worth a potentially misaimed comment IMHO :) –  delnan Sep 24 '12 at 19:24
    
Actually, it really is about just one function. m1 contains more, but only f depends on a. –  Lev Levitsky Sep 24 '12 at 19:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.