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I've looked on google and other stackoverflow Use of unassigned local variable errors and I still cannot find the answer. I think that maybe my error is cause be misusing the scopes of ExtractionCtrl. I tried this code to test the scope and it works. So I don't know where is my mistake now.

Testing the scope

namespace RandomTesting
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int x = 5;

            switch (x)
            {
                case 2:
                    System.Console.WriteLine("Your # is 2");
                    break;

                case 5:
                    System.Console.WriteLine("Your # is :{0}", x);
                    x = x + 2;
                    System.Console.WriteLine("Your # is :{0}", x);
                    break;
            }

            System.Console.WriteLine("Your # is :{0}", x);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

PART OF THE MAIN CODE

switch (arg)
{
    case "AR":
        ExtractionCtrl = new ARExtractionController();

        // add new mapping here
        break;

    case "ICN":
        ExtractionCtrl = new IcnExtractionController();

        // add new mapping here
        break;
}

int ticketID;
if (int.TryParse(arg, out ticketID))
{
    string returnedFilePath = ExtractionController.GetStartupPath();
    ExtractionCtrl.Extract(ticketID, returnedFilePath, AR_TEMPLATE_PATH, MAPPING_PATH);
}
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1  
was the value of arg actually "AR" or "ICN"? Note the case sensitivity. –  CaffGeek Sep 24 '12 at 19:41
1  
Where are you getting the error? If it's because ExtractionCtrl isn't assigned, then please post the code for where it is defined and where you assign it a value –  Servy Sep 24 '12 at 19:41
1  
If the value of arg is AR or ICN, why are you trying to do int.TryParse? Won't it always be false? –  IronMan84 Sep 24 '12 at 19:41
    
-arg is "AR" - int.Tryparse : I know , sorry , I'm trying to modified someone else's code –  Conrad C Sep 24 '12 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your switch to set ExtractionCtrl does not have a default-case, so it is possible that ExtractionCtrl is not initalized after the switch. Since you do not show the declaration of ExtractionCtrl, I'm assuming it is declared without initialization:

SomeExtractionCtrlType ExtractionCtrl;

Hence the error.

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Thank you!, wow I feel dumb and guilty of posting stupid questions on stackoverflow. –  Conrad C Sep 24 '12 at 19:50

You most likely need a default block in your switch.

switch (arg)
{
    case "AR":
        ExtractionCtrl = new ARExtractionController();

        // add new mapping here
        break;

    case "ICN":
        ExtractionCtrl = new IcnExtractionController();

        // add new mapping here
        break;
    default:
        ExtractionCtrl = new DefaultExtractionController();
        break;
}

Or you could initialize ExtractionCtrl when you define it. I like the default option more, though.

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If such a case should never happen, you could throw an exception there. The compiler will understand that if that happens you can't ever reach the code that would use the variable for that case. –  Servy Sep 24 '12 at 19:44
    
Well yeah, but I don't know his business rules at all. –  Gromer Sep 24 '12 at 19:44
    
I'm not saying he must throw an exception, merely that it's a viable alternative to using a default value if there isn't any acceptable default value. –  Servy Sep 24 '12 at 19:45
    
Ah I see. Defiantly a good option. –  Gromer Sep 24 '12 at 19:48
1  
Doesn't matter, the compiler sees that there are cases where you won't have initialized ExtractionCtrl, and that's why it's complaining. If this was a runtime error, and arg was set to "AR", you'd be fine. But this is a compile time error, so you have to initialize it. –  Gromer Sep 24 '12 at 19:51

In Visual Studio, this is a pretty common compile-time error, it means that the compiler thinks there's a chance the variable won't be initialized before it is called. What you should do is add a default case, as other answers say, but also initialize your variable when you declare it, either to null, or to the value you set it to in your default. Visual Studio is unfortunately very picky, and it doesn't see that all potential paths do end up granting a value.

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