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There are twenty-five bar stools in a row. Customers who enter the bar follow these two rules:

  1. The customer will always sit in the seat farthest away from any other customer.
  2. A customer will never sit right next to another customer.

Using these two rules, where should you place the first customer so that the maximum number of customers could sit at the bar?

I can solve it in 25 stools condition. But I can not figure out a general algorithm for n stools.

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2  
1. not sure it's ontopic 2. please share your solution for 25 stools –  CharlesB Sep 24 '12 at 20:11
    
What does an optimal seating arrangement look like with 25 customers? –  Matt Ball Sep 24 '12 at 20:16
    
See the accepted answer guys. –  user1695481 Sep 24 '12 at 20:52
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@user1695481 - the accepted answer is not what you asked for. –  IVlad Sep 24 '12 at 21:03
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I think it is. Search this "take one a third of the way down the line" through the article. –  user1695481 Sep 24 '12 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By the sound of it this is almost exactly the same as the International Choice of Urinal Protocol (I.C.U.P.) which Randall Munroe has written up an excellent analysis of, including a closed form equation and a plot of optimal urinal counts. You should read his article before reading the rest of this answer.


In the post Randall mentions:

[I]f you enter a bathroom with an awkward number of vacant urinals in a row, rather than taking one of the end ones, you can take one a third of the way down the line. This will break the awkward row into two optimal rows, turning a worst-case scenario into a best-case one.

While he doesn't go into more detail than that, it hints at what we're trying to do. If we have an awkward number of urinals (or stools, in our case), we can attempt to seat the first person in a seat such that they become the end of two different optimal sub-groups.

For 7 seats, the basic selection behavior nets this:

1 _ _ 3 _ _ 2

Leaving four unoccupied seats. But if instead we seat the first person at position three, we get optimal 3 and 5 sub-groups, increasing our possible occupants by one.

3 _ 1 _ 4 _ 2

For 25 the basic behavior is similarly sub-optimal, leading to 9/25ths occupancy before awkwardness:

1 _ _ 6 _ _ 4 _ _ 7 _ _ 3 _ _ 8 _ _ 5 _ _ 9 _ _ 2

But we can seat someone at position 9, creating optimal 9 17 sub-groups, like so:

3 _ 8 _ 5 _ 9 _ 1 _ 10 _ 6 _ 11 _ 4 _ 12 _ 7 _ 13 _ 2

Leading to optimal 13/25ths occupancy.

More generally, I believe finding the largest optimal number smaller than the number of seats, and seating the first person there (in the 25 case, that's 17, which is equivalently 9th from the other direction) will always maximize the number of occupiable chairs. In worst-case scenarios, like 25, this is equivalent to ceil(n/3) which Randall mentions.

In average cases (neither best nor worst using the basic seating behavior), we cannot always reach 50% occupancy by only seating the first person, because we can only create one optimal subgroup, leaving the other somewhere less than optimal. Therefore we take the largest optimal subgroup in order to minimize the number of sub-optimal seats. For instance, for 20 seats, we take 17 and create a 17 4 group, which optimizes as many seats as possible, leaving only two in a row empty:

2 _ 7 _ 4 _ 8 _ 3 _ 9 _ 5 _ 10 _ 1 _ _ 6

The four group is actually technically both a best and worst case, but hopefully you can see how the pattern would scale.

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I don't think that helps much, since this question asks where to place the first one to make it optimal. In that one, the first person is fixed, and they admit it's not always optimal. For example, following that you get 3 for n = 7, but if you place the first one at position 3, you can get 4. –  IVlad Sep 24 '12 at 20:31
    
Thank you so much! –  user1695481 Sep 24 '12 at 20:55
    
@dimo414, any input on your link question being close, but not the answer - the "third of the way along" statement not working for 7 and 11 stools in this case? –  Paddy3118 Sep 25 '12 at 2:59
    
@Paddy3118 - see my edit. The "third of the way along" rule does actually work for 7, though for 11 you would instead want to use my generalized rule to seat someone at position 9 (or equivalently at position 3), creating an optimal 9 3 grouping. –  dimo414 Sep 25 '12 at 14:44

Here's my analysis.

For the sake of argument, let's say the first person sits somewhere in the middle, not too close to either end. This will give us a pattern like this, where x denotes an occupied seat and _ a free seat:

_ _ _ ... _ x _ ... _ _ _

The first customer to sit on the left of this person will sit at the far left end. Similarly, the first customer to sit on the right of this person will sit at the far right end. This leaves us with a pattern like this, where -m- denotes m consecutive free seats:

x _ -m- _ x _ -n- _ x

Call this a 'basic configuration' with the total number of seats s = m + n + 7.

Okay, so now our problem is split into two subproblems of size m and n, each of which will be filled by a customer sitting as close to the middle of each area as possible.

For maximum final occupancy, we want m and n to be 'ideal' numbers, defined as follows:

a is ideal if a = 2b + 3 and b is ideal  (i.e., we will get -b- _ x _ -b-).

The idea here is that an ideal number of seats can be maximally occupied by (1) taking the middle seat of a and (2) recursively solving for the two sub-problems of size b.

The least ideal number is 1.

From this, we can build up the first few ideal numbers:

1, 5, 13, 29, ...

Now, for s = 25, our basic configuration says 25 = m + n + 7 and we want m and n to be ideal. Well, 25 - 7 = 18 and 18 = 5 + 13, which are ideal!

Therefore, for 25 seats, we sit the first person at seat 4 + 5 = 9 or 4 + 13 = 17, and we are guaranteed to end up with maximum occupancy.

One last thing to check before we finish up: what if the first customer sat on an end stool? Then, after the second customer sits, we would have

x _ -m- _ x

where m would have to be an ideal number. For 25 seats, this gives 25 - 4 = m = 21, which is not ideal. Therefore the first customer cannot sit at either end for maximum occupancy of 25 seats.

Ta daaaaaah!

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Your algorithm seems to be missing something. It excludes 3 even though it's the most ideal number of seats greater than 1 (it can be 2/3rds occupied). Similarly 9 is excluded, even though it can be 5/9ths occupied by merely seating the first guest on an end. –  dimo414 Sep 27 '12 at 4:40
    
@dimo414: I didn't complete the analysis past solving for 25. But here's the filler: your initial basic configuration is either "first person sits somewhere in the middle", leading to degenerate solutions 1, 5, then generally to m + n + 7 (m and n ideal), or you have "first person sits on the end", leading to degenerate solutions 1, 3, then generally to m + 4 (m ideal). Since 5 is ideal and 5 + 4 = 9, 9 is a solution for the latter basic configuration. Similarly, since 1 is ideal and 1 + 1 + 7 = 9, 9 is a solution for the former configuration. –  Rafe Sep 27 '12 at 4:49
    
@dimo414: Now, our ideal numbers start 1, 5, 13, 29. Hence, from "starting in the middle" we get solutions 1, 5, 9 (1 + 1 + 7), 13 (1 + 5 + 7), 17 (5 + 5 + 7), 21 (1 + 13 + 7), 25 (5 + 13 + 7), 33 (13 + 13 + 7), etc. From "starting at the end" we get solutions 1, 3, 5 (1 + 4), 9 (5 + 4), 17 (13 + 4), 33 (29 + 4), etc. Merging, we have solutions 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 33, etc. –  Rafe Sep 27 '12 at 4:59

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