Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am having some issues trying to match a certain config block (multiple ones) from a file. Below is the block that I'm trying to extract from the config file:

ap71xx 00-01-23-45-67-89
 use profile PROFILE
 use rf-domain DOMAIN
 hostname ACCESSPOINT
 area inside
!

There are multiple ones just like this, each with a different MAC address. How do I match a config block across multiple lines?

share|improve this question
    
Is it always ap71xx? Also, will xx always be numbers or something like that? – Nick Sep 24 '12 at 21:48
    
There are different "beginning" points, possibly, but the data that I'm looking to extract will always start with "ap71xx." And the "xx" aren't wildcards, they are literally two x's. – Scott Sep 24 '12 at 23:28
up vote 16 down vote accepted

The first problem you may run into is that in order to match across multiple lines, you need to process the file's contents as a single string rather than by individual line. For example, if you use Get-Content to read the contents of the file then by default it will give you an array of strings - one element for each line. To match across lines you want the file in a single string (and hope the file isn't too huge). You can do this like so:

$fileContent = [io.file]::ReadAllText("C:\file.txt")

Or in PowerShell 3.0 you can use Get-Content with the -Raw parameter:

$fileContent = Get-Content c:\file.txt -Raw

Then you need to specify a regex option to match across line terminators i.e.

  • SingleLine mode (. matches any char including line feed), as well as
  • Multiline mode (^ and $ match embedded line terminators), e.g.
  • (?smi) - note the "i" is to ignore case

e.g.:

C:\> $fileContent | Select-String '(?smi)([0-9a-f]{2}(-|\s*$)){6}.*?!' -AllMatches |
        Foreach {$_.Matches} | Foreach {$_.Value}

00-01-23-45-67-89
 use profile PROFILE
 use rf-domain DOMAIN
 hostname ACCESSPOINT
 area inside
!
00-01-23-45-67-89
 use profile PROFILE
 use rf-domain DOMAIN
 hostname ACCESSPOINT
 area inside
!

Use the Select-String cmdlet to do the search because you can specify -AllMatches and it will output all matches whereas the -match operator stops after the first match. Makes sense because it is a Boolean operator that just needs to determine if there is a match.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! Thank you for your help! That did the trick. Earlier I was playing around with the regex string(s) I didn't escape the "!" like you have above...so that was another problem! Thank you for your help! – Scott Sep 24 '12 at 23:40
    
Thank you, the [io.file]::ReadAllText() method was what I was missing – David Clarke May 8 '15 at 0:10

This regex will search for the text ap followed by any number of characters and new lines ending with a !:

(?si)(a).+?\!{1}

So I was a little board. I wrote a script that will break up the text file as you described (as long as it only contains the lines you displayed). It might work with other random lines, as long as they don't contain the key words: ap, profile, domain, hostname, or area. It will import them, and check line by line for each of the properties (MAC, Profile, domain, hostname, area) and place them into an object that can be used later. I know this isn't what you asked for, but since I spent time working on it, hopefully it can be used for some good. Here is the script if anyone is interested. It will need to be tweaked to your specific needs:

$Lines = Get-Content "c:\test\test.txt"
$varObjs = @()
for ($num = 0; $num -lt $lines.Count; $num =$varLast ) {
    #Checks to make sure the line isn't blank or a !. If it is, it skips to next line
    if ($Lines[$num] -match "!") {
        $varLast++
        continue
    }
    if (([regex]::Match($Lines[$num],"^\s.*$")).success) {
        $varLast++
        continue
    }
    $Index = [array]::IndexOf($lines, $lines[$num])
    $b=0
    $varObj = New-Object System.Object
    while ($Lines[$num + $b] -notmatch "!" ) {
        #Checks line by line to see what it matches, adds to the $varObj when it finds what it wants.
        if ($Lines[$num + $b] -match "ap") { $varObj | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name Mac -Value $([regex]::Split($lines[$num + $b],"\s"))[1] }
        if ($lines[$num + $b] -match "profile") { $varObj | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name Profile -Value $([regex]::Split($lines[$num + $b],"\s"))[3] }
        if ($Lines[$num + $b] -match "domain") { $varObj | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name rf-domain -Value $([regex]::Split($lines[$num + $b],"\s"))[3] }
        if ($Lines[$num + $b] -match "hostname") { $varObj | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name hostname -Value $([regex]::Split($lines[$num + $b],"\s"))[2] }
        if ($Lines[$num + $b] -match "area") { $varObj | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name area -Value $([regex]::Split($lines[$num + $b],"\s"))[2] }
        $b ++
    } #end While
    #Adds the $varObj to $varObjs for future use
    $varObjs += $varObj
    $varLast = ($b + $Index) + 2
}#End for ($num = 0; $num -lt $lines.Count; $num = $varLast)
#displays the $varObjs
$varObjs
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for this, Nick! This is very helpful! I'll definitely put it to use. – Scott Sep 24 '12 at 23:42

In case this may still be of value to someone and depending on the actual requirement, the regex in Keith's answer doesn't need to be that complicated. If the user simply wants to output each block the following will suffice:

$fileContent = [io.file]::ReadAllText("c:\file.txt")
$fileContent |
    Select-String '(?smi)ap71xx[^!]+!' -AllMatches |
    %{ $_.Matches } |
    %{ $_.Value }

The regex ap71xx[^!]*! will perform better and the use of .* in a regular expression is not recommended because it can generate unexpected results. The pattern [^!]+! will match any character except the exclamation mark, followed by the exclamation mark.

If the start of the block isn't required in the output, the updated script is:

$fileContent |
    Select-String '(?smi)ap71xx([^!]+!)' -AllMatches |
    %{ $_.Matches } |
    %{ $_.Groups[1] } |
    %{ $_.Value }

Groups[0] contains the whole matched string, Groups[1] will contain the string match within the parentheses in the regex.

If $fileContent isn't required for any further processing, the variable can be eliminated:

[io.file]::ReadAllText("c:\file.txt") |
    Select-String '(?smi)ap71xx([^!]+!)' -AllMatches |
    %{ $_.Matches } |
    %{ $_.Groups[1] } |
    %{ $_.Value }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.