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I want to plot three graphs in a 1x3 layout. Only the first graph needs to have vertical axis labels, but I want all three plot areas to be exactly the same size. This would be no problem if either none or all of the graphs had axis labels. But how do I get all three graphs the same size when one has axis labels and the other two don't? I'm trying to do this in base graphics because that's what I know best, but I'd be happy to use grid or ggplot2 if they provide better methods for solving my problem.

Here's some fake data, my plotting code, and the plot itself:

# Fake Data
data = structure(list(y1 = 1:5, y2 = c(1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6), y3 = c(1.44, 
2.88, 4.32, 5.76, 7.2)), .Names = c("y1", "y2", "y3"), 
row.names = c("I needed 12 units for financial aid", 
              "I couldn't find any other open classes",
              "I might be adding a major or minor", 
              "The class seemed interesting", "The class fit into my schedule"
), class = "data.frame")

# Plotting code
par(mar=c(5,15,4,1))
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
barplot(data$y1,names.arg=row.names(data), horiz=TRUE,las=1, +
        xlim=c(0,8), main="Group 1")
par(mar=c(5,1,4,1))
barplot(data$y2,names.arg=row.names(data), horiz=TRUE,las=1, +
        axisnames=FALSE, xlim=c(0,8), main="Group 2")
barplot(data$y3,names.arg=row.names(data), horiz=TRUE,las=1, +
        axisnames=FALSE, xlim=c(0,8), main="Group 3")

# Reset plot options back to defaults
par(mfrow=c(1,1)
par(mar=c(5,4,4,2)+0.1)

[Update: I chose the answer that most directly answered my question, which was in base graphics, but I recommend looking at the other solutions as well, as they show how to do the same thing in lattice and ggplot2.]

enter image description here

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

For base graphics you want to use an outer margin rather than the regular margins. Just replace the first par(mar=c(5,15,4,1)) with par(oma=c(0,15,0,0)) and remove the second call to par and the plots will take equal space (and the axis labels will stick into the outer margin on the left).

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Changing the oma setting seems to "reset" the plot area. For example, if I make the first plot with oma=c(0,15,0,0) and then call par(oma=c(0,0,0,0)) followed by plot(...), I end up with two separate plots, rather than two plots on the same "page". Is there a way to tell R to keep the same 1x3 plotting area after the first plot, even though I've called oma? –  eipi10 Sep 24 '12 at 21:48
    
@eipi10 you should only set the oma parameter once, don't change it between individual frames. –  Greg Snow Sep 25 '12 at 14:08
    
That worked, thanks. Out of curiosity, why don't you have to reset oma back to c(0,0,0,0) after drawing the first plot? Also, for future reference, to the extent there are cases where one would want to change graphical parameters between plots, is there a way to prevent R from resetting the plot area? –  eipi10 Sep 25 '12 at 15:57
    
The oma parameter like the mfrow parameter and others deal with the entire plotting device, so changing them will reset the page. Parameters that only deal with an individual frame (like mar) will not reset the entire page. The outer margins are outside of all the frames and need to stay the same for the entire 'page'. –  Greg Snow Sep 25 '12 at 16:35
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The easiest way with base graphics is probably to make them all with no y-axis labels and then add the labels separately in an additional panel to the left of all three of them.

But tasks like this are one of the reasons why lattice (and ggplot, for that matter) were invented. You might also consider a dotplot, especially if you're a William Cleveland fan.

library(reshape2)
d2 <- data
d2$q <- rownames(d2)
d2 <- melt(d2, measure.vars=1:3, id.vars=4)
d2$q <- factor(d2$q, levels=rownames(data))

library(lattice)
barchart(q ~ value|variable, data=d2)
dotplot(q ~ value|variable, data=d2)

enter image description here enter image description here

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I could probably piece something together using layout, but it was just faster to do it using the faceting feature of ggplot2:

data$grp <- rownames(data)
datam <- melt(data,id.vars = "grp")
ggplot(datam,aes(x = grp,y = value)) + 
    facet_wrap(~variable,nrow = 1) + 
    geom_bar(stat = "identity") + 
    coord_flip()

enter image description here

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+1 if I could, but after accidental downwote (fat fingers) I have it locked :( –  Petr Matousu Dec 21 '12 at 21:13
    
@PetrMatousu Ha ha! That's awesome. I've done that myself from time to time. –  joran Dec 21 '12 at 21:29
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Expanding on Greg Snow's answer (in light of your follow-up question) here is a minimal edit of your code that does it with base graphics:

op <- par(oma=c(0,15,0,0), mfrow=c(1,3), mar=c(5,1,4,1))
barplot(data$y1,names.arg=row.names(data), horiz=TRUE,las=1, xlim=c(0,8), main="Group 1")
barplot(data$y2,names.arg=row.names(data), horiz=TRUE,las=1, axisnames=FALSE, xlim=c(0,8), main="Group 2")
barplot(data$y3,names.arg=row.names(data), horiz=TRUE,las=1, axisnames=FALSE, xlim=c(0,8), main="Group 3")
par(op)

the key to avoiding the "reset" you mention is assigning all the parameters in a single call to par()

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