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Is it possible to disable certain pylint errors/warnings in the python source code itself ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The #pylint: disable syntax mentionned by @kalgasnik is the correct one. You can find more information about this in the Pylint FAQ (your question is meth2)

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def foo():
    print "000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000"
print "111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111"

pylint output:

C:  2: Line too long (87/80)
C:  3: Line too long (83/80)
C:  1: Missing docstring
C:  1:foo: Black listed name "foo"
C:  1:foo: Missing docstring

Add comment "# pylint: disable=CODE", code for "Line too long" message - C0301:

def foo():
    # pylint: disable=C0301
    print "000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000"
print "111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111"

pylint output:

I:  2: Locally disabling C0301
C:  4: Line too long (83/80)
C:  1: Missing docstring
C:  1:foo: Black listed name "foo"
C:  1:foo: Missing docstring
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In the eclipse ide, with pydev, you can put a comment after the line of code, with the format # IGNORE:_ID_. I don't know if this also works in other programs. For example:

import something  # IGNORE:W0611
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1  
To my knowledge, there is nothing in Pylint supporting this comment format. Maybe your IDE supports this to not report the Pylint warning, but this makes it IDE-specific. –  gurney alex Sep 25 '12 at 7:06
    
@gurney I am indeed using eclipse with pydev. I never realised that this was an ide specific feature. –  BrtH Sep 25 '12 at 10:40
    
@gurney: Done, I should have thought of editing it immediately after your comment. Butyyou could also have edited it yourself, of course (no offense). –  BrtH Sep 26 '12 at 10:41

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