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I'm trying to pick out an instance of a model ("Package") by its relation to two other models to which it belongs ("Cut" and "Animal"). While there are, say many packages with :cut_id 3 and many with :animal_id 4, there should only be one with both, and I want to pick that one out and display its contents in a table.

I've tried the following DIY mess, and it's not really working. (cutfind is a method I created that I know works for calling out all of the cuts associated with the given animal.)

<% @animal.cutfind.each do |cut| %>
  <tr>
    <td><%= cut.name %></td>
    <td><%= number_to_currency(cut.price) %></td>
    <td><%= cut.package_weight %> lb</td>
        <% @a = Package.where(:animal_id => @animal.id) %>
        <% @pset = @a.where(:cut_id => cut.id) %>
    <% @pset.each do |p| %>
        <td><%= p.original %></td>
        <td><%= p.left %></td>
    <% end %>
  </tr>
<%end%>

Any idea how to do this [better]? Thanks.

Update: I tried this other DIY mess and am getting the same problem (the cells aren't even being created, which leads me to believe that @pset is empty).

This is in my animal model:

def packagefind
    Package.where(:animal_id => self.id)
end

And then I changed the above like so:

<td><%= cut.package_weight %> lb</td>
        <% @pset = @animal.packagefind.where(:cut_id => cut.id) %>
    <% @pset.each do |p| %>
        <td><%= p.original %></td>
        <td><%= p.left %></td>
    <% end %>
share|improve this question
    
There's a potential problem with your HTML layout. Each row (tr) of a table should have the same number of data cells (td), but @pset isn't guaranteed to have the same number of elements in each row, right? So the number of cells may vary. –  cdesrosiers Sep 24 '12 at 21:21
    
Pset would actually be the same every time. The each block is just my hacky way of dealing with the fact that I was getting a list of (1) elements, instead of a single element. I ran into this problem before when using blank.where(etc), because it always returns a list, even if it's guaranteed (as here) to be a single element. –  Sasha Sep 24 '12 at 21:24
    
This is for the below, cause it wouldn't let me add comments there (!?). So it doesn't quite work. I now get an error saying that @p (which I assigned to Package.find_by_cut_id_and_animal_id(cut.id, @animal.id), is of NilClass, which is sort of weird. Does this likely have to do with architecture differences? –  Sasha Sep 24 '12 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As I'm not able to comment on your post, I take a guess: You have the folllowing architecture:

Cut -> Package <- Animal

In this, "->" and "<-" are one-to-many relationships so that

class Package < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :cuts
  has_many :animals
end

So, you want "the" package, that has Cut with id 3 and Animal id 4. Did you try:

x = Product.select { |product| product.cuts.include?(Cut.find(3)) }.select{ |product| product.animals.include?(Animal.find(4)) }

?

EDIT: I first suggested to you use

Product.find_by_product_id_and_animal_id() 

which didn't work but showed the OP the way to do it

share|improve this answer
    
It's actually a bit different. Animals have many packages. Packages belong to one animal. Cuts don't have or belong to anything; they're just associated manually. (Package has a cut_id, but not visa versa). I haven't tried that. I didn't know that existed. Let me give it a shot. Thanks! –  Sasha Sep 24 '12 at 21:20
    
Sorry, I edited it because I tried it and it didn't work (that find_by thingy. Try the new one. It's pretty messy and DB intensive, though :( –  Raul Pinto Sep 24 '12 at 21:48
    
I actually got find_by_etc to work. My main problem that was throwing me off even in my DIY was that I'd been assigning packages an animal_id right before I created the animal, so it was always nil. I had to move the package_create method I had to after I created animals, and things now work. Thanks for the help! –  Sasha Sep 24 '12 at 22:21
    
Hm, ok. So actually the current answer did not help you. I'm new to Stackoverflow. Is there a "standard way" to change my answer so that future readers understand it? –  Raul Pinto Sep 25 '12 at 8:10
    
No. Your answer was fine, and I'm pretty new to Stack Overflow too. The only reasons I didn't use it were a) The relationships between the models weren't quite what you suggested, and b) the find_by_cut_id_and_animal_id thing worked great and seemed a lot neater. –  Sasha Sep 26 '12 at 3:33

Rails will automatically generate methods to help you find the associated records if you define the following relations:

class Animal
  has_many :cuts
  has_many :packages, :through => :cuts
end

class Cut
  belongs_to :animal
  belongs_to :package
end

class Package
  has_many :cuts
  has_many :animals, :through => :cuts
end

In your controller, the following line will eager load all the records you will need in your view:

@animal = Animal.includes(:cuts => :package)

Your view can then be shortened to:

<% @animal.cuts.each do |cut| %>
  <tr>
    <td><%= cut.name %></td>
    <td><%= number_to_currency(cut.price) %></td>
    <td><%= cut.package_weight %> lb</td>
    <td><%= cut.package.original %></td>
    <td><%= cut.package.left %></td>
  </tr>
<%end%>
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