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What happens when you cast from short to byte in C#?

Can someone explain what's happening when casting a value to a byte, if it's outside the range of min/max byte? It seems to be taking the integer value and modulo it with 255. I'm trying to understand the reason for why this doesn't throw an exception.

int i = 5000;
byte b = (byte)i;

Console.WriteLine(b);  // outputs 136
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marked as duplicate by Austin Salonen, Sani Huttunen, Bryan Crosby, dash, Graviton Sep 25 '12 at 6:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
(modulo 256, just to be clear) –  Tenner Sep 24 '12 at 21:13
    
Because the language spec says so. If you want an exception, you need a checked context. –  harold Sep 24 '12 at 21:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

5000 is represented as 4 bytes (int) (hexadecimal)

|00|00|13|88|

Now, when you convert it to byte, it just takes the last 1-byte.

Reason: At the IL level, conv.u1 operator will be used which will truncate the high order bits if overflow occurs converting int to byte. (See remarks section in the conv.u1 documentation).

|88|

which is 136 in decimal representation

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What's happening is the system is dropping the Most Significant Bytes in order to make it fit. Look at this StackOverFlow answer for a pretty good explanation on what's going on.

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I suppose there's no way to check at compile time, and there's a real incentive not to throw exceptions for conversions for base types. Dropping bits seems like the best of a bunch of bad options. –  Tenner Sep 24 '12 at 21:15
    
Well if you don't explicitly cast it, C# should throw you a compile-time error. For example: byte b = myInt;...That should throw an error. Now if you explicitly cast it, like in your example above, no error will be thrown –  Icemanind Sep 24 '12 at 21:18

I'm trying to understand the reason for why this doesn't throw an exception.

Because the default setting for overflow checking is off.

Try this, it will throw:

checked
{
    int i = 5000;
    byte b = (byte)i;

    Console.WriteLine(b);
}

The short form is:

int i = 5000;
byte b = checked ( (byte)i );    
Console.WriteLine(b);
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You get 5000%256 = 136, like always with overfull.

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It is also explained in MSDN. Use checked() to throw exception if overflow occurs. Also read this: MSDN: Chapter 5: More About Variables

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It is my understanding that whenever you cast a larger type into a smaller type, you are left with only the least significant bits of the larger type.

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if your value between (0 and 255) you will gain the same value

if your value large than 255 without using Checked your Result will be input - 255 ex

            int i = 256;
            byte b = (byte)i;

            Console.WriteLine(b); // output = 1

            int i = 257;
            byte b = (byte)i;
            Console.WriteLine(b); // output = 2  

................ etc

If you want to gain an exception You Have to use Checked Keyword.

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