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I'm looking to figure out the best way to execute a database query using the least amount of boilerplate code. The method suggested in the SqlCommand documentation:

private static void ReadOrderData(string connectionString)
{
    string queryString = "SELECT OrderID, CustomerID FROM dbo.Orders;";
    using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
    {
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(queryString, connection);
        connection.Open();
        SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();
        try
        {
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}, {1}",     reader[0], reader[1]));
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            reader.Close();
        }
    }
}

mostly consists of code that would have to be repeated in every method that interacts with the database.

I'm already in the habit of factoring out the establishment of a connection, which would yield code more like the following. (I'm also modifying it so that it returns data, in order to make the example a bit less trivial.)

private SQLConnection CreateConnection()
{
    var connection = new SqlConnection(_connectionString);
    connection.Open();
    return connection;
}

private List<int> ReadOrderData()
{
    using(var connection = CreateConnection())
    using(var command = connection.CreateCommand())
    {
        command.CommandText = "SELECT OrderID FROM dbo.Orders;";

        using(var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
        {
            var results = new List<int>();
            while(reader.Read()) results.Add(reader.GetInt32(0));
            return results;
        }
    }
}

That's an improvement, but there's still enough boilerplate to nag at me. Can this be reduced further? In particular, I'd like to do something about the first two lines of the procedure. I don't feel like the method should be in charge of creating the SqlCommand. It's a tiny piece of repetition as it is in the example, but it seems to grow if transactions are being managed manually or timeouts are being altered or anything like that.

edit: Assume, at least hypothetically, there's going to have to be a bunch of different types of data being returned. And consequently the solution can't be just one one-size-fits-all method, there will have to be a few different ones depending, at minimum, on whether ExecuteNonQuery, ExecuteScalar, ExecuteReader, ExecuteReaderAsync, or any of the others are being called. I'd like to cut down on the repetition among those.

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1  
To use an ORM ;) –  PHeiberg Sep 24 '12 at 21:22
    
@PHeiberg - Too many custom queries; I fear that in the current project an ORM would quickly devolve into an instance of the softcoding anti-pattern. –  Sean U Sep 24 '12 at 21:28
    
I have to agree with PHeiberg, if you want something without boilerplate code you will end up building your own ORM - which will never be quite as good as NHibernate or EF. –  Laoujin Sep 24 '12 at 21:28
    
Do you want to populate custom objects or is returning an untyped DataTable good enough? Or perhaps you want to return IEnumerable<Tuples>? –  Laoujin Sep 24 '12 at 21:37
    
The part where you instantiate the connection away from the actual usage is a really bad idea. Someone coming along might easily NOT handle it with the using clause and end up spending an inordinate amount of time tracking down memory / connection leaks. –  NotMe Sep 24 '12 at 21:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Tried Dapper?

Granted this doesn't get you a DataReader but you might just prefer it this way once you've tried it.

It's about the lightest-weight an ORM can be while still being called an ORM. No more methods to map between DataReader and strong types for me.

Used right here on all the StackExchange sites.

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(cs))
{
    var dogs = connection.Query("select name, age from dogs");

    foreach (dynamic dog in dogs)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} age {1}", dog.name, dog.age);
    }
}

or

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(cs))
{
    var dogs = connection.Query<Dog>("select Name, Age from dogs");

    foreach (Dog dog in dogs)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} age {1}", dog.Name, dog.Age);
    }
}

class Dog
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting. Not getting a DataReader is fine; a strongly-typed list is preferable anyway. –  Sean U Sep 24 '12 at 22:44
    
And if you don't like the use of dynamic, call Query<T> where T is a class you define that has properties named the same as the fields SELECTed in your query. –  tomfanning Sep 25 '12 at 8:08

If you want to roll data access on your own, this pattern of help methods could be one way to remove duplication:

private List<int> ReadOrderData()
{
    return ExecuteList<int>("SELECT OrderID FROM dbo.Orders;", 
        x => x.GetInt32("orderId")).ToList();
}

private IEnumerable<T> ExecuteList(string query, 
    Func<IDataRecord, T> entityCreator)
{
    using(var connection = CreateConnection())
    using(var command = connection.CreateCommand())
    {
        command.CommandText = query;
        connection.Open();
        using(var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
        {
            while(reader.Read()) 
               yield return entityCreator(reader);
        }
    }
}

You'll have to add support for parameters and this might not compile, but the pattern is what I'm trying to illustrate.

share|improve this answer

What I typically do is use a custom class that I wrote a while back that accepts a SQL string, and optionally a list of parameters and it returns a DataTable.

Since the thing that changes between invocations is typically just the SQL that is optimal IMHO.

If you truly do need to use a DataReader you can do something like this:

public void ExecuteWithDataReader(string sql, Action<DataReader> stuffToDo) {
    using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString)) {
        using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection)) {
            connection.Open();

            using (SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader()) {
                try {
                    while (reader.Read()) {
                        stuffToDo(reader);
                    }
                }
                finally {
                    reader.Close();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}


private static void ReadOrderData(string connectionString) {
    string sql = "SELECT OrderID, CustomerID FROM dbo.Orders;";

    ExecuteWithDataReader(sql, r => Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}, {1}", r[0], r[1])));
}
share|improve this answer
    
you need to wrap the sqlcommand and sqldatareader in using blocks as well. otherwise you have a memory leak when exceptions are thrown. –  Jason Meckley Sep 24 '12 at 21:28
    
Good catch, I just copied/pasted the original code. Fixed –  Dylan Smith Sep 24 '12 at 21:31
    
@Jason Uhm the finalizer will kick in (and release all unmanaged resources) when exceptions are thrown when you didn't call Dispose() manually. –  Laoujin Sep 24 '12 at 21:34
    
@Laoujin: That might have taken care of the reader, but certainly not the command object given the code before the edit. –  NotMe Sep 24 '12 at 21:47

The first two line are the most important thing you need...

but if you still wish to do it, you can turn them to a database handler class, yes it will become more of code, but in refactoring concept, every thing will move to the related topic...

try to write a singleton class, that receive a command and do action, so return result of type SqlDataReader reader...

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1  
Don't return the reader itself, it's too easy to screw up properly disposing of it. If you need to return something use a datatable or a collection of your own objects. –  NotMe Sep 24 '12 at 21:48
    
to return ur own object... it's also good as refactoring say store data in new variable, But, in here our data that we retrieve may be large, so it's not bad to point to the array it self... if he exactly point to it after initializing it... i mean dont keep it for later, as u said he may destroy it... –  deadManN Sep 25 '12 at 13:28
    
but mostly i talked about data base handler class and query method... and i meant to encapsulate this section 'using(var connection = CreateConnection()) using(var command = connection.CreateCommand()) ' and then retrieve data from a method... casue if he move these.. he need a method to point to a location which they are exist and be any access to them, so he need a method that give him a reference to reader.... if he's sure that Handler class is not about to query any thing else, he can also process it and return another data set... of for example of type int –  deadManN Sep 25 '12 at 13:29

If you use something like LINQ-to-SQL or LINQ-to-Entities, you can even avoid writing any SQL and have the benefits of compile time syntax checking as well:

using(var db = new MyDataContext())
{
  var items = db.Orders.Select(item => new { item.OrderID, item.CustomerID })
                       .ToList();
  items.ForEach(item => Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", item.OrderID, item.CustomerID);
}
share|improve this answer

Doing this in comments was too much.

I would suggest that the boilerplate code around

    using(conn = new sqlconnection)
    using(cmd = new sqlcommand) {
          // blah blah blah
    }

isn't something to be lightly removed and instead would encourage that you keep it exactly where it's at. Resources, especially unmanaged ones, should be opened and released at the closest point to execution as possible IMHO.

In no small part due to the ease with which other developers will fail to follow the appropriate clean up conventions.

If you do something like

private SQLConnection CreateConnection()   
{   
    var connection = new SqlConnection(_connectionString);   
    connection.Open();   
    return connection;   
}   

Then you are inviting another programmer to call this method and completely fail to release the resource as soon as the query is executed. I don't know what kind of app you are building, but in a web app such a thing will lead to memory / connection / resource errors of types that are difficult to debug, unless you've been through it before.

Instead, I'd suggest you look into a lightweight ORM such as Dapper.net or similar to see how they approached it. I don't use dapper, but I hear it's pretty good. The reason I don't use it is simply that we don't allow inline sql to be executed against our databases (but that's a very different conversation).


Here's our standard:

public static DataTable StatisticsGet( Guid tenantId ) {
    DataTable result = new DataTable();
    result.Locale = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;

    Database db = DatabaseFactory.CreateDatabase(DatabaseType.Clients.ToString());

    using (DbCommand dbCommand = db.GetStoredProcCommand("reg.StatsGet")) {
        db.AddInParameter(dbCommand, "TenantId", DbType.Guid, tenantId);

        result.Load(db.ExecuteReader(dbCommand));
    } // using dbCommand

    return result;
} // method::StatisticsGet

We make heavy use of Enterprise Library. It's short, simple and to the point and very well tested. This method just returns a datatable but you could easily have it return an object collection.. or nothing.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you then also suggest that developers should never use SqlConnection.CreateCommand() because it obfuscates the fact that SqlCommand needs to be disposed of? –  Sean U Sep 24 '12 at 22:12
    
@SeanU: See the update for what we do. I guess my point is: with what you have so far, be extremely careful. Code reviews only go so far. You're much better off not doing it OR implementing something like dapper or entlib. –  NotMe Sep 24 '12 at 22:19
    
Your sample also uses a factory method to return a disposable object. What's so special about SqlConnection that people will get confused about it if it's returned by a factory, even if they aren't confused when factories return other types of disposables? –  Sean U Sep 24 '12 at 22:22

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