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I was wondering about the proper use of locks in properties. I am writing a multi-threaded server application, where throughput is very important. If I have a property declared like that:

    private DataPoint a;
    private object aLock = new object();

The most conservative lock seems to be the following (call it Method 1). But, in this case, on every invocation after the initial one, there will be an overhead of a lock:

    public DataPoint A
    {
        get
        {
            lock (aLock)
            {
                if (a == null)
                {
                    a = new DataPoint();
                }

                return a;
            }
        }
    }

Or, should I move the lock to just the line that sets "a" (call it Method 2). In this case, there is a possibility that "a" will be set several times (which is Ok), but once it's set, there is no overhead of a lock.

    public DataPoint A
    {
        get
        {
            if (a == null)
            {
                lock(aLock)
                {
                    a = new DataPoint();
                }
            }

            return a;
        }
    }

What is the recommended way to lock concurrent access to properties? Is it method 1, method 2 or none of the above?

Thanks.

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2  
The lock in the second example is completely pointless (no pun intended), but whether you should be locking at all (as opposed to just having a sensible initialization value) is a different quesiton. –  Kirk Woll Sep 24 '12 at 21:59
1  
Why don't you initialize your DataPoint in the class constructor? –  Steve Sep 24 '12 at 22:01
    
The second example may be a valid scenario, depending on what's going on in the constructor of the DataPoint. I should have not used "new DataPoint()" for illustration purposes, but instead used something like DataPoint.Create("A")... –  user1044169 Sep 24 '12 at 22:03
    
you are developing a server and u have locks? good luck. –  DarthVader Sep 24 '12 at 22:03
    
The second scenario is indeed valid. You'd probably not want to lock if it has already been initialized. However, after the lock(aLock) you should (again) check a for null or else you may end up initializing multiple times if two concurrent calls to the getter are executed when a is not initialized. –  Pablo Romeo Sep 24 '12 at 22:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In .NET 4, you have the System.Lazy<T> type that takes care of these issues for you:

class MyClass
{
    private readonly Lazy<DataPoint> lazy =
        new Lazy<Singleton>(() => new DataPoint());

    public DataPoint Instance { get { return lazy.Value; } }
} 

Courtesy of Jon Skeet

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nice, i learn something new every day! –  esskar Sep 24 '12 at 22:19
    
Note that in this particular case, a simple static readonly field would have the same effect. –  Sebastian Sep 24 '12 at 22:19
    
@Sebastian - when and how would you initialize that field ? –  Ohad Schneider Sep 24 '12 at 22:24
    
As Jon Skeet points out in the same article as item 4 (or 5 for that matter), static fields are initialized on the first class access if you provide a static constructor. –  Sebastian Sep 27 '12 at 8:00
    
@Sebastian I see. However since your comment I have altered the post to be more similar to the OP's code, and now nothing is static... –  Ohad Schneider Sep 27 '12 at 12:38

In your example of locking, you are doing so to initialize a value. Assuming the null condition means the the value needs to be initialized, you should be checking for it before and after you acquire the lock:

if(a == null)
{
  lock(aLock)
  {
    if(a == null)
      a = new DataPoint();
  }
}

The reason for this is because while a thread is waiting on the lock, there's a chance that the work it is going to do once it acquires the lock is already being done by a different thread. So when the thread acquires the lock, it should check to see if the work still needs to be done.

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1  
Some people consider double check locking to be an anti-pattern en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-checked_locking –  hatchet Sep 24 '12 at 22:11
3  
Actually, under the ECMA CLI memory model it may even be broken: csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx (Third version) –  Ohad Schneider Sep 24 '12 at 22:15
    
Under the Java memory model this is definitely broken unless the reference is volatile or the DataPoint is atomically constructed – for Java this would mean that all fields are final. –  Jed Wesley-Smith Sep 25 '12 at 2:15

you should check for null before locking. if it is null, then lock, and check for null again. if it is still null, initiate your DataPoint and assign it to a temporary variable first. when done, assign it to your member and return it.

private DataPoint _dataPoint;

public DataPoint A
{
    get
    {
        if(_dataPoint != null)
            return _dataPoint;

        lock (aLock)
        {
            if (_dataPoint == null)
            {
                var dataPoint = new DataPoint();
                // do more stuff with dataPoint
                _dataPoint = dataPoint;
            }

            return _dataPoint;
        }
    }
}
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