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How can I make sure that after I "catch" an error and log it no further code steps are executed (I do not want to use q())?

My usage scenario is like this: - do some calculations - if error occurs log it - stop executing any further steps in the code

I tried to solve this using code example below (print is used instead of true logging function):

handleMySimpleError<-function(e, text) {
    # Let's log the error
    print(paste0(text, ": ", e))
    # This should stop execution of any further steps but it doesn't
    stop("Now, stop. For real.")
}

print("Starting execution...")
tryCatch(
    stop("My simple error."),
    error=function(e) {handleMySimpleError(e, "could not finish due to")}, finnaly=NULL
)
print("Successfully ended execution...")

I somehow hoped that print("Successfully ended execution...") would never get executed... But, here is the output I get:

> handleMySimpleError<-function(e, text) {
+   # Let's log the error
+   print(paste0(text, ": ", e))
+   # This should stop execution of any further steps but it doesn't
+   stop("Now, stop. For real.")
+ }
>  
> print("Starting execution...")
[1] "Starting execution..."
> tryCatch(
+   stop("My simple error."),
+   error=function(e) {handleMySimpleError(e, "could not finish due to")}, finnaly=NULL
+ )
[1] "could not finish due to: Error in doTryCatch(return(expr), name, parentenv, handler): My simple error.\n"
Error in handleMySimpleError(e, "could not finish due to") : 
Now, stop. For real.
> print("Successfully ended execution...")
[1] "Successfully ended execution..."

How to prevent from print("Successfully ended execution...") being executed? What is the correct strategy to stop code processing after error is logged in error handler function?

share|improve this question
    
How are you executing that code? Sourcing a script? –  joran Sep 24 '12 at 22:18
    
I am testing it now via StatEt Eclipse plugin using Ctrl+R+R. I would like to use "script" in "production" like: /usr/bin/R --vanilla --quiet < /home/code/MyScript.R –  Samo Sep 24 '12 at 22:22
    
When I put that code in a script and source it, it seems to work as you want it to. If I send it directly to the console, I get the behavior you describe in your question. –  joran Sep 24 '12 at 22:23
    
joran thank you. Do you maybe know for a work around or better/more suitable strategy to achieve what I want (that would work in all execution scenarios: script and console)? –  Samo Sep 24 '12 at 22:30
    
I suspect that the better strategy is to not attempt this by sending code directly to the console. Sourcing scripts is generally better for production code anyway. –  joran Sep 24 '12 at 22:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just wrap curly braces around it

>     {
+       handleMySimpleError<-function(e, text) {
+           # Let's log the error
+           print(paste0(text, ": ", e))
+           # This should stop execution of any further steps but it doesn't
+           stop("Now, stop. For real.")
+       }
+       print("Starting execution...")
+       tryCatch(
+           stop("My simple error."),
+           error=function(e) {handleMySimpleError(e, "could not finish due to")}, finally=NULL
+       )
+       print("Successfully ended execution...") 
+     }
[1] "Starting execution..."
[1] "could not finish due to: Error in doTryCatch(return(expr), name, parentenv, handler): My simple error.\n"
Error in handleMySimpleError(e, "could not finish due to") : 
  Now, stop. For real.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Great. I just need to figure out why using curly braces actually works and why not without them... :) This is counter-intuitive for me. Will consult Pat Burns R Inferno. –  Samo Sep 25 '12 at 5:55
    
The problem is that you are executing 1 line at a time. So, after the stop, you get an error message, then you execute the next line. If you wrap in braces, you're essentially telling R, "run this entire block at once instead of line-by-line." Now, when it gets an error, it exits the code block. –  GSee Sep 25 '12 at 12:46
    
I see it now. Thank you. It makes more sense. I assumed the processing is done in similar fashion as in SAS... –  Samo Sep 25 '12 at 20:30

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