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What are undefined reference/unresolved external symbol errors? What are common causes and how to fix/prevent them?

Feel free to edit/add your own.

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20  
Outstanding layout and presentation for this question and the answers, Luchian. Thank you for taking the time to do this, and in the process giving us all a place we can send people with this continually recurring problem. –  WhozCraig Dec 28 '12 at 11:50
    
One thing to consider adding is how to deal with "undefined vtable" and "undefined typeinfo" errors in particular (since they are less obvious than undefined functions or variables). –  Jeremiah Willcock Jul 16 '13 at 18:25
    
I've been marking this question to be a possible dupe of this one. But after going through all of your (brilliant) answers, I can't see this case covered here. I'm aware it's specific about how an IDE sets up the project type and it's linkage dependencies. But that's a such frequently asked question I think it would be worth covered (maybe just with a link to another appropriate dupe) here. If it is already, and I just didn't spot it, forget about this request/comment. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 3 at 21:14
    
@πάνταῥεῖ you're right, it's not covered here - feel free to add an answer. ;) –  Luchian Grigore Mar 3 at 21:34
    
@LuchianGrigore 'feel free to add an answer' I preferred to add the relevant link (IMHO) your primary answer, if you'd like to permit. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 3 at 22:36

14 Answers 14

up vote 165 down vote accepted

Compiling a C++ program takes place in several steps, as specified by 2.2 (credits to Keith Thompson for the reference):

The precedence among the syntax rules of translation is specified by the following phases [see footnote].

  1. Physical source file characters are mapped, in an implementation-defined manner, to the basic source character set (introducing new-line characters for end-of-line indicators) if necessary. [SNIP]
  2. Each instance of a backslash character (\) immediately followed by a new-line character is deleted, splicing physical source lines to form logical source lines. [SNIP]
  3. The source file is decomposed into preprocessing tokens (2.5) and sequences of white-space characters (including comments). [SNIP]
  4. Preprocessing directives are executed, macro invocations are expanded, and _Pragma unary operator expressions are executed. [SNIP]
  5. Each source character set member in a character literal or a string literal, as well as each escape sequence and universal-character-name in a character literal or a non-raw string literal, is converted to the corresponding member of the execution character set; [SNIP]
  6. Adjacent string literal tokens are concatenated.
  7. White-space characters separating tokens are no longer significant. Each preprocessing token is converted into a token. (2.7). The resulting tokens are syntactically and semantically analyzed and translated as a translation unit. [SNIP]
  8. Translated translation units and instantiation units are combined as follows: [SNIP]
  9. All external entity references are resolved. Library components are linked to satisfy external references to entities not defined in the current translation. All such translator output is collected into a program image which contains information needed for execution in its execution environment. (emphasis mine)

[footnote] Implementations must behave as if these separate phases occur, although in practice different phases might be folded together.

The specified errors occur during this last stage of compilation, most commonly referred to as linking. It basically means that you compiled a bunch of implementation files into object files or libraries and now you want to get them to work together.

Say you defined symbol a in a.cpp. Now, b.cpp declared that symbol and used it. Before linking, it simply assumes that that symbol was defined somewhere, but it doesn't yet care where. The linking phase is responsible for finding the symbol and correctly linking it to b.cpp (well, actually to the object or library that uses it).

If you're using MSVS, you'll see that projects generate .lib files. These contain a table of exported symbols, and a table of imported symbols. The imported symbols are resolved against the libraries you link against, and the exported symbols are provided for the libraries that use that .lib (if any).

Similar mechanism exist for other compilers/platforms.

Common error messages are error LNK2001, error LNK1120 for MSVS and undefined reference to symbolName for gcc.

The code:

struct X
{
   virtual void foo();
};
struct Y : X
{
   void foo() {}
};
struct A
{
   virtual ~A() = 0;
};
struct B: A
{
   virtual ~B(){}
};
extern int x;
void foo();
int main()
{
   x = 0;
   foo();
   Y y;
   B b;
}

would generate the following errors with gcc:

/home/AbiSfw/ccvvuHoX.o: In function `main':
prog.cpp:(.text+0x10): undefined reference to `x'
prog.cpp:(.text+0x19): undefined reference to `foo()'
prog.cpp:(.text+0x2d): undefined reference to `A::~A()'
/home/AbiSfw/ccvvuHoX.o: In function `B::~B()':
prog.cpp:(.text._ZN1BD1Ev[B::~B()]+0xb): undefined reference to `A::~A()'
/home/AbiSfw/ccvvuHoX.o: In function `B::~B()':
prog.cpp:(.text._ZN1BD0Ev[B::~B()]+0x12): undefined reference to `A::~A()'
/home/AbiSfw/ccvvuHoX.o:(.rodata._ZTI1Y[typeinfo for Y]+0x8): undefined reference to `typeinfo for X'
/home/AbiSfw/ccvvuHoX.o:(.rodata._ZTI1B[typeinfo for B]+0x8): undefined reference to `typeinfo for A'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

and similar errors with MSVS:

1>test2.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "void __cdecl foo(void)" (?foo@@YAXXZ)
1>test2.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "int x" (?x@@3HA)
1>test2.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: virtual __thiscall A::~A(void)" (??1A@@UAE@XZ)
1>test2.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: virtual void __thiscall X::foo(void)" (?foo@X@@UAEXXZ)
1>...\test2.exe : fatal error LNK1120: 4 unresolved externals

Common causes include:

share|improve this answer
    
@MirroredFate is there a way to get better VS linker errors? To get it look more like gcc ones, for example. –  TankorSmash Dec 4 '13 at 4:43
    
@TankorSmash If only. I think you can modify output using this, but I haven't tried it. –  MirroredFate Dec 4 '13 at 17:46
10  
Personally, I think the MS linker error messages are just as readable as the GCC errors. They also have the advantage of including both the mangled and unmangled names for the unresolved external. Having the mangled name can be helpful when you need to look at the libraries or object files directly to see what the problem might be (for example, a calling convention mismatch). Also, I'm not sure what version of MSVC produced the errors here, but newer versions include the name (both mangled and unmangled) of the function referring to the unresolved external symbol. –  Michael Burr Dec 30 '13 at 20:29

Class members:

A pure virtual destructor needs an implementation.

Declaring a destructor pure still requires you to define it (unlike a regular function):

struct X
{
    virtual ~X() = 0;
};
struct Y : X
{
    ~Y() {}
};
int main()
{
    Y y;
}
//X::~X(){} //uncomment this line for successful definition

This happens because base class destructors are called when the object is destroyed implicitly, so a definition is required.

virtual methods must either be implemented or defined as pure.

This is similar to non-virtual methods with no definition, with the added reasoning that the pure declaration generates a dummy vtable and you might get the linker error without using the function:

struct X
{
    virtual void foo();
};
struct Y : X
{
   void foo() {}
};
int main()
{
   Y y; //linker error although there was no call to X::foo
}

For this to work, declare X::foo() as pure:

struct X
{
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

Non-virtual class members

Some members need to be defined even if not used explicitly:

struct A
{ 
    ~A();
};

The following would yield the error:

A a;      //destructor undefined

The implementation can be inline, in the class definition itself:

struct A
{ 
    ~A() {}
};

or outside:

A::~A() {}

If the implementation is outside the class definition, but in a header, the methods have to be marked as inline to prevent a multiple definition.

All used member methods need to be defined if used.

A common mistake is forgetting to qualify the name:

struct A
{
   void foo();
};

void foo() {}

int main()
{
   A a;
   a.foo();
}

The definition should be

void A::foo() {}

static data members must be defined outside the class in a single translation unit:

struct X
{
    static int x;
};
int main()
{
    int x = X::x;
}
//int X::x; //uncomment this line to define X::x

An initializer can be provided for a static const data member of integral or enumeration type within the class definition; however, odr-use of this member will still require a namespace scope definition as described above. C++11 allows initialization inside the class for all static const data members.

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1  
The last line of this answer is incorrect, an in-class declaration is never a definition. (Definitions aren't needed for static members that aren't odr-used, which is common for integral compile-time constants) –  Ben Voigt Aug 12 at 17:55
    
Not sure this part - C++11 allows initialization inside the class for all static const data members is correct. [class.static.data]/3 says you need to mark the static data members constexpr if they're not of integral or enumeration type. –  Praetorian Sep 9 at 1:08
    
No need to define any non-virtual function you never use. Also, no need to define any virtual function, if you never construct an object of the class, nor call it from a derived class you actually instantiate. In addition, all pure virtual functions can be defined. –  Deduplicator Sep 20 at 19:06
    
@Deduplicator "need" vs. "should". Pedantically, non-pure virtual functions need be defined (although, as mentioned, some compilers won't complain until you call them, but some will). I don't think I said you can't define pure virtuals. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 20 at 19:09
    
@Deduplicator see "A virtual function declared in a class shall be defined, or declared pure (10.4) in that class, or both; but no diagnostic is required" (10.3 Virtual functions) - unless this was changed in C++14 –  Luchian Grigore Sep 20 at 19:13

Declared but did not define a variable or function.

A typical variable declaration is

extern int x;

As this is only a declaration, a single definition is needed. A corresponding definition would be:

int x;

For example, the following would generate an error:

extern int x;
int main()
{
    x = 0;
}
//int x; // uncomment this line for successful definition

Similar remarks apply to functions. Declaring a function without defining it leads to the error:

void foo(); // declaration only
int main()
{
   foo();
}
//void foo() {} //uncomment this line for successful definition

Be careful that the function you implement exactly matches the one you declared. For example, you may have mismatched cv-qualifiers:

void foo(int& x);
int main()
{
   int x;
   foo(x);
}
void foo(const int& x) {} //different function, doesn't provide a definition
                          //for void foo(int& x)

Other examples of mismatches include

  • Function/variable declared in one namespace, defined in another.
  • Function/variable declared as class member, defined as global (or vice versa).
  • Function return type, parameter number and types, and calling convention do not all exactly agree.

The error message from the compiler will often give you the full declaration of the variable or function that was declared but never defined. Compare it closely to the definition you provided. Make sure every detail matches.

share|improve this answer
    
@Raymond I left out function name misspell as it's fairly obvious. As for parameter names - what? –  Luchian Grigore Jun 10 '13 at 1:59
    
People do ask about unresolved externals due to misspelled names, so it's not entirely obvious. (Not sure what you're referring to about parameter names. Parameter names are not part of the type.) –  Raymond Chen Jun 10 '13 at 5:14
    
@RaymondChen already covered by stackoverflow.com/a/12574420/673730 –  Luchian Grigore Aug 8 at 10:34

Failure to link against appropriate libraries/object files or compile implementation files

Commonly, each translation unit will generate an object file that contains the definitions of the symbols defined in that translation unit. To use those symbols, you have to link against those object files.

Under gcc you would specify all object files that are to be linked together in the command line, or compile the implementation files together.

g++ -o test objectFile1.o objectFile2.o -lLibraryName

For XCode: Add the User Header Search Paths -> add the Library Search Path -> drag and drop the actual library reference into the project folder.

Under MSVS, files added to a project automatically have their object files linked together and a lib file would be generated (in common usage). To use the symbols in a separate project, you'd need to include the lib files in the project settings. This is done in the Linker section of the project properties, in Input -> Additional Dependencies. (the path to the lib file should be added in Linker -> General -> Additional Library Directories) When using a third-party library that is provided with a lib file, failure to do so usually results in the error.

It can also happen that you forget to add the file to the compilation, in which case the object file won't be generated. In gcc you'd add the files to the command line. In MSVS adding the file to the project will make it compile it automatically.

In Windows programming, the tell-tale sign that you did not link a necessary library is that the name of the unresolved symbol begins with __imp_. Look up the name of the function in the documentation, and it should say which library you need to use. For example, MSDN puts the information in a box at the bottom of each function in a section called "Library".

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Incorrectly importing/exporting methods/classes accross modules. (compiler specific)

MSVS requires you to specify which symbols to export and import using __declspec(dllexport) and __declspec(dllimport).

This dual functionality is usually obtained through the use of a macro:

#ifdef THIS_MODULE
#define DLLIMPEXP __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#define DLLIMPEXP __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

The macro THIS_MODULE would only be defined in the module that exports the function. That way, the declaration:

DLLIMPEXP void foo();

expands to

__declspec(dllexport) void foo();

and tells the compiler to export the function, as the current module contains its definition. When including the declaration in a different module, it would expand to

__declspec(dllimport) void foo();

and tells the compiler that the definition is in one of the libraries you linked against (also see 1)).

You can similary import/export classes:

class DLLIMPEXP X
{
};
share|improve this answer
    
To be complete, this answer should mention GCC's visibility and Windows' .def files, as these also influence the symbol name and presence. –  rubenvb Dec 23 '12 at 15:39
    
@rubenvb I haven't used .def files in ages. Feel free to add an answer or edit this one. –  Luchian Grigore Dec 28 '12 at 19:14

Template implementations not visible.

Unspecialized templates must have their definitions visible to all translation units that use them. That means you can't separate the definition of a template to an implementation file. If you must separate the implementation, the usual workaround is to have an impl file which you include at the end of the header that declares the template. A common situation is:

template<class T>
struct X
{
    void foo();
};

int main()
{
    X<int> x;
    x.foo();
}

//differentImplementationFile.cpp
template<class T>
void X<T>::foo()
{
}

To fix this, you must move the definition of X::foo to the header file or some place visible to the translation unit that uses it.

Specialized templates can be implemented in an implementation file and the implementation doesn't have to be visible, but the specialization must be previously declared.

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Further information for "templates must be defined in the header" can be found in stackoverflow.com/questions/495021 –  PlasmaHH Jul 4 at 21:55

Symbols were defined in a C program and used in C++ code.

The function (or variable) void foo() was defined in a C program and you attempt to use it in a C++ program:

void foo();
int main()
{
    foo();
}

The C++ linker expects names to be mangled, so you have to declare the function as:

extern "C" void foo();
int main()
{
    foo();
}

Equivalently, instead of being defined in a C program, the function (or variable) void foo() was defined in C++ but with C linkage:

extern "C" void foo();

and you attempt to use it in a C++ program with C++ linkage.

If an entire library is included in a header file (and was compiled as C code); the include will need to be as follows;

extern "C" {
    #include "cheader.h"
}
share|improve this answer

If all else fails, recompile.

I was recently able to get rid of an unresolved external error in Visual Studio 2012 just by recompiling the offending file. When I re-built, the error went away.

This usually happens when two (or more) libraries have a cyclic dependency. Library A attempts to use symbols in B.lib and library B attempts to use symbols from A.lib. Neither exist to start off with. When you attempt to compile A, the link step will fail because it can't find B.lib. A.lib will be generated, but no dll. You then compile B, which will succeed and generate B.lib. Re-compiling A will now work because B.lib is now found.

share|improve this answer
    
Correct - this happens when libraries have a cyclic dependency. –  Luchian Grigore Dec 3 '13 at 20:51
    
I expanded on your answer and linked in in the main one. Thanks. –  Luchian Grigore Dec 3 '13 at 20:56

undefined reference to WinMain@16 or similar 'unusual' main() entry point reference (especially for ).

You may have missed to choose the right project type with your actual IDE. The IDE may want to bind e.g. Windows Application projects to such entry point function (as specified in the missing reference above), instead of the commonly used int main(int argc, char** argv); signature.

If your IDE supports Plain Console Projects you might want to choose this project type, instead of a windows application project.

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1  
Can't help but point out this question and the fact that this is more often caused by having no main function at all than not having WinMain. Valid C++ programs need a main. –  chris Mar 11 at 3:46

The order in which interdependent linked libraries are specified is wrong.

The order in which libraries are linked DOES matter if the libraries depend on each other. In general, if library A depends on library B, then libA MUST appear before libB in the linker flags.

For example:

// B.h
#ifndef B_H
#define B_H

struct B {
    B(int);
    int x;
};

#endif

// B.cpp
#include "B.h"
B::B(int xx) : x(xx) {}

// A.h
#include "B.h"

struct A {
    A(int x);
    B b;
};

// A.cpp
#include "A.h"

A::A(int x) : b(x) {}

// main.cpp
#include "A.h"

int main() {
    A a(5);
    return 0;
};

Create the libraries:

$ g++ -c A.cpp
$ g++ -c B.cpp
$ ar rvs libA.a A.o 
ar: creating libA.a
a - A.o
$ ar rvs libB.a B.o 
ar: creating libB.a
a - B.o

Compile:

$ g++ main.cpp -L. -lB -lA
./libA.a(A.o): In function `A::A(int)':
A.cpp:(.text+0x1c): undefined reference to `B::B(int)'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status
$ g++ main.cpp -L. -lA -lB
$ ./a.out

So to repeat again, the order DOES matter!

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what is an "undefined reference/unresolved external symbol"

I'll try to explain what is an "undefined reference/unresolved external symbol".

note: i use g++ and Linux and all examples is for it

note2: sorry for my English, i'm just learning it. Feel free to edit my answer :)

For example we have code

// src1.cpp
void print();

static int local_var_name; // 'static' makes variable not visible for other modules
int global_var_name = 123;

int main()
{
    print();
    return 0;
}

and

// src2.cpp
extern "C" int printf (const char*, ...);

extern int global_var_name;
//extern int local_var_name;

void print ()
{
    // printf("%d%d\n", global_var_name, local_var_name);
    printf("%d\n", global_var_name);
}

Make object files

$ g++ -c src1.cpp -o src1.o
$ g++ -c src2.cpp -o src2.o

After assembler phase we have an object file, wich contains any symbols to export. Look at the symbols

$ readelf --symbols src1.o
  Num:    Value          Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
     5: 0000000000000000     4 OBJECT  LOCAL  DEFAULT    4 _ZL14local_var_name # [1]
     9: 0000000000000000     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    3 global_var_name     # [2]

I rejected some lines from output, because they are not matter

So, we have see follow symbols to export.

[1] - this is our static (local) variable (important - Bind has a type "LOCAL")
[2] - this is our global variable

src2.cpp exports nothing and we'll not see it symbols

Link our object files

$ g++ src1.o src2.o -o prog

and run it

$ ./prog
123

Linker saw at exported sysmbols and links it. Now we'll try to uncomment lines in src2.cpp like here

// src2.cpp
extern "C" int printf (const char*, ...);

extern int global_var_name;
extern int local_var_name;

void print ()
{
    printf("%d%d\n", global_var_name, local_var_name);
}

and rebuild object file

$ g++ -c src2.cpp -o src2.o

OK (no errors), because we only build object file, linking is not doing yet. Try to link

$ g++ src1.o src2.o -o prog
src2.o: In function `print()':
src2.cpp:(.text+0x6): undefined reference to `local_var_name'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

It's happened because our local_var_name is static, ie it's not visible for other modules. We'll understand more deeply. Get translation phase output

$ g++ -S src1.cpp -o src1.s

// src1.s
look src1.s

    .file   "src1.cpp"
    .local  _ZL14local_var_name
    .comm   _ZL14local_var_name,4,4
    .globl  global_var_name
    .data
    .align 4
    .type   global_var_name, @object
    .size   global_var_name, 4
global_var_name:
    .long   123
    .text
    .globl  main
    .type   main, @function
main:
; assembler code, not interesting for us
.LFE0:
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 4.8.2-19ubuntu1) 4.8.2"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

So, we've see there is no label for local_var_name, that's why linker not found it. But we are hackers :) and we can fix it. Open src1.s in your texteditor and change

.local  _ZL14local_var_name
.comm   _ZL14local_var_name,4,4

to

    .globl  local_var_name
    .data
    .align 4
    .type   local_var_name, @object
    .size   local_var_name, 4
local_var_name:
    .long   456789

ie you should get like bellow

    .file   "src1.cpp"
    .globl  local_var_name
    .data
    .align 4
    .type   local_var_name, @object
    .size   local_var_name, 4
local_var_name:
    .long   456789
    .globl  global_var_name
    .align 4
    .type   global_var_name, @object
    .size   global_var_name, 4
global_var_name:
    .long   123
    .text
    .globl  main
    .type   main, @function
main:
; ...

we'll have changed visibility of local_var_name and it value to 456789 Try to build object file from it

$ g++ -c src1.s -o src2.o

ok, see readelf output (symbols)

$ readelf --symbols src1.o
8: 0000000000000000     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    3 local_var_name

now local_var_name has Bind GLOBAL (was LOCAL)

link

$ g++ src1.o src2.o -o prog

and run it

$ ./prog 
123456789

ok, we hack it :)

So, as result - an "undefined reference/unresolved external symbol error" happens when linker cannot found global symbols in object files.

share|improve this answer

Also if you're using 3rd party libraries make sure you have the correct 32/64 bit binaries

share|improve this answer

Linked .lib file is associated to a .dll

I had the same issue. Say i have projects MyProject and TestProject. I had effectively linked the lib file for MyProject to the TestProject. However, this lib file was produced as the DLL for the MyProject was built. Also, I did not contain source code for all methods in the MyProject, but only access to the DLL's entry points.

To solve the issue, i built the MyProject as a LIB, and linked TestProject to this .lib file (i copy paste the generated .lib file into the TestProject folder). I can then build again MyProject as a DLL. It is compiling since the lib to which TestProject is linked does contain code for all methods in classes in MyProject.

share|improve this answer

Microsoft offers a #pragma to reference the correct library at link time;

#pragma comment(lib, "libname.lib")

In addition to the library path including the directory of the library, this should be the full name of the library.

share|improve this answer

protected by Marco A. Oct 18 at 7:43

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