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I have the following SQL statement

SELECT be.*, it.order_number
FROM songs AS be

INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT song_id, order_number
    FROM items
    WHERE order_status = 1
) it
ON be.id = it.song_id

INNER JOIN orders AS or
ON it.order_number = or.order_number

WHERE be.active = 0

I can't seem to understand why this statement does not produce any results. When I remove the following line;

INNER JOIN orders AS or
ON it.order_number = or.order_number

It seems to produce results, and I know that the order_number does exist in the orders table - so it's clearly incorrect syntax but i'm not sure where to go from here? Appreciate the help.

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3  
Have you considered the possibility that "or" might be a reserved word? –  Ian McLaird Sep 24 '12 at 22:35
    
Not until you just said it, thanks Ian, silly mistake. –  Wasim Sep 24 '12 at 22:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem in this particular instance is that the or in the query is a reserved word. You can use that if you wish, but you'll have to quote it, like so

SELECT be.*, it.order_number
FROM songs AS be

INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT song_id, order_number
    FROM items
    WHERE order_status = 1
) it
ON be.id = it.song_id

INNER JOIN orders AS "or"
ON it.order_number = "or".order_number

WHERE be.active = 0

Generally though, for readability, I'd avoid such names. If you have to quote it or escape it, it's probably a bad name.

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