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The problem is easy, I want to iterate over each element of the list and the next one in pairs (wrapping the last one with the first).

I've thought about two unpythonic ways of doing it:

def pairs(lst):
    n = len(lst)
    for i in range(n):
        yield lst[i],lst[(i+1)%n]

and:

def pairs(lst):
    return zip(lst,lst[1:]+[lst[0]])

expected output:

>>> for i in pairs(range(10)):
    print i

(0, 1)
(1, 2)
(2, 3)
(3, 4)
(4, 5)
(5, 6)
(6, 7)
(7, 8)
(8, 9)
(9, 0)
>>>

any suggestions about a more pythonic way of doing this? maybe there is a predefined function out there I haven't heard about?

also a more general n-fold (with triplets, quartets, etc. instead of pairs) version could be interesting.

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1  
Your first solution is good enough! –  Xolve May 26 '11 at 13:09
3  
In the second version, change lst[0] to lst[:1] to make it work for an empty sequence. The code becomes more symmetrical, too. –  Darius Bacon Apr 20 '12 at 4:40

13 Answers 13

def pairs(lst):
    i = iter(lst)
    first = prev = item = i.next()
    for item in i:
        yield prev, item
        prev = item
    yield item, first

Works on any non-empty sequence, no indexing required.

share|improve this answer
1  
I like the stream quality to it. And the use of iter() is polished. –  hughdbrown Aug 10 '09 at 22:08
3  
Doesn't work on an empty sequence. –  Darius Bacon Aug 10 '09 at 23:00
5  
@Darius, if you need to support empty seq's, use next(i, sentinel) in lieu of the old-fashioned i.next(), after setting sentinel = object(); and, if first is sentinel: return just before the for. –  Alex Martelli Aug 11 '09 at 1:51
    
@Darius: I have clarified that the sequence must be non-empty. It's debatable what it should do for an empty sequence: version 1 of the OP yields an empty sequence, and version two raises IndexError. –  Martin v. Löwis Aug 11 '09 at 3:35
2  
Crashes on a 1-element sequence: after calling i.next() the sequence is empty, so the loop doesn't bind item, so yield item, first raises an UnboundLocalError. –  katrielalex Feb 19 '12 at 23:10
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I've coded myself the tuple general versions, I like the first one for it's ellegant simplicity, the more I look at it, the more Pythonic it feels to me... after all, what is more Pythonic than a one liner with zip, asterisk argument expansion, list comprehensions, list slicing, list concatenation and "range"?

def ntuples(lst, n):
    return zip(*[lst[i:]+lst[:i] for i in range(n)])

The itertools version should be efficient enough even for large lists...

from itertools import *
def ntuples(lst, n):
    return izip(*[chain(islice(lst,i,None), islice(lst,None,i)) for i in range(n)])

And a version for non-indexable sequences:

from itertools import *
def ntuples(seq, n):
    iseq = iter(seq)
    curr = head = tuple(islice(iseq, n))
    for x in chain(iseq, head):
        yield curr
        curr = curr[1:] + (x,)

Anyway, thanks everybody for your suggestions! :-)

share|improve this answer
4  
Your first answer (in your question) is a million times easier to understand than either of these. That makes it much more pythonic in my book :-/ –  John Fouhy Aug 10 '09 at 22:48
    
hmmmm... maybe it's been too much codegolf for me ^-^ –  fortran Aug 10 '09 at 22:50
    
try this: "for a in ntuples(count(), 3): print a;" I think you need to use itertools.tee() to get this to work. –  hughdbrown Aug 10 '09 at 23:05
    
count is not an indexable sequence, so it's normal it doesn't work with this method that uses slices extensively... –  fortran Mar 3 '10 at 15:40
    
Hoho, got to love the sarcasm! –  Humphrey Bogart Aug 21 '10 at 14:30

This might be satisfactory:

def pairs(lst):
    for i in range(1, len(lst)):
        yield lst[i-1], lst[i]
    yield lst[-1], lst[0]

>>> a = list(range(5))
>>> for a1, a2 in pairs(a):
...     print a1, a2
...
0 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 0

If you like this kind of stuff, look at python articles on wordaligned.org. The author has a special love of generators in python.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I noticed that and I've fixed it -- in the space of time it took to down-vote it. My fault, really. –  hughdbrown Aug 10 '09 at 22:02

I, as always, like tee:

from itertools import tee, izip, chain

def pairs(iterable):
    a, b = tee(iterable)
    return izip(a, chain(b, [next(b)]))
share|improve this answer

I'd do it like this (mostly because I can read this):

class Pairs(object):
    def __init__(self, start):
        self.i = start
    def next(self):
        p, p1 = self.i, self.i + 1
        self.i = p1
        return p, p1
    def __iter__(self):
        return self

if __name__ == "__main__":
    x = Pairs(0)
    y = 1
    while y < 20:
        print x.next()
        y += 1

gives:

(0, 1)
(1, 2)
(2, 3)
(3, 4)
(4, 5)
(5, 6)
(6, 7)
(7, 8)
(8, 9)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Personally, I like this solution much better than the 'yield' based solutions. –  Tall Jeff Aug 11 '09 at 0:54
[(i,(i+1)%len(range(10))) for i in range(10)]

replace range(10) with the list you want.

In general "circular indexing" is quite easy in python; just use:

a[i%len(a)] 
share|improve this answer

To answer your question about solving for the general case:

import itertools

def pair(series, n):
    s = list(itertools.tee(series, n))
    try:
        [ s[i].next() for i in range(1, n) for j in range(i)]
    except StopIteration:
        pass
    while True:
        result = []
        try:
            for j, ss in enumerate(s):
                result.append(ss.next())
        except StopIteration:
            if j == 0:
                break
            else:
                s[j] = iter(series)
                for ss in s[j:]:
                    result.append(ss.next())
        yield result

The output is like this:

>>> for a in pair(range(10), 2):
...     print a
...
[0, 1]
[1, 2]
[2, 3]
[3, 4]
[4, 5]
[5, 6]
[6, 7]
[7, 8]
[8, 9]
[9, 0]
>>> for a in pair(range(10), 3):
...     print a
...
[0, 1, 2]
[1, 2, 3]
[2, 3, 4]
[3, 4, 5]
[4, 5, 6]
[5, 6, 7]
[6, 7, 8]
[7, 8, 9]
[8, 9, 0]
[9, 0, 1]
share|improve this answer
    
well, pair() is misnamed now ;) –  Stefano Borini Aug 10 '09 at 22:38
    
Yes, misnamed, not pretty, and 2 minutes after the OP's pythoned-to-the-max self-answer. Ah well. –  hughdbrown Aug 10 '09 at 22:51

This infinitely cycles, for good or ill, but is algorithmically very clear.

from itertools import tee, cycle

def nextn(iterable,n=2):
    ''' generator that yields a tuple of the next n items in iterable.
    This generator cycles infinitely '''
    cycled = cycle(iterable)
    gens = tee(cycled,n)

    # advance the iterators, this is O(n^2)
    for (ii,g) in zip(xrange(n),gens):
        for jj in xrange(ii):
            gens[ii].next()

    while True:
        yield tuple([x.next() for x in gens])


def test():
    data = ((range(10),2),
        (range(5),3),
        (list("abcdef"),4),)
    for (iterable, n) in data:
        gen = nextn(iterable,n)
        for j in range(len(iterable)+n):
            print gen.next()            


test()

gives:

(0, 1)
(1, 2)
(2, 3)
(3, 4)
(4, 5)
(5, 6)
(6, 7)
(7, 8)
(8, 9)
(9, 0)
(0, 1)
(1, 2)
(0, 1, 2)
(1, 2, 3)
(2, 3, 4)
(3, 4, 0)
(4, 0, 1)
(0, 1, 2)
(1, 2, 3)
(2, 3, 4)
('a', 'b', 'c', 'd')
('b', 'c', 'd', 'e')
('c', 'd', 'e', 'f')
('d', 'e', 'f', 'a')
('e', 'f', 'a', 'b')
('f', 'a', 'b', 'c')
('a', 'b', 'c', 'd')
('b', 'c', 'd', 'e')
('c', 'd', 'e', 'f')
('d', 'e', 'f', 'a')
share|improve this answer
    
I like the use of itertools.cycle(). I am not sure why your test code does range(len(iter) + n). I think range(len(iter)) is correct. Your n**2 code to advance the iterators is like my code: [ s[i].next() for i in range(1, n) for j in range(i)]. –  hughdbrown Aug 11 '09 at 0:55
    
re: len(iter)+n... I wanted to show that it really does cycle infinitely. it's just in the test code, after all. Your one-liner for advancing is shorter/better. In any case, that's the one line in the code that definitely needs a comment, since it's the crux of the algorithm :) –  Gregg Lind Aug 11 '09 at 1:00

Even shorter version of Fortran's zip * range solution (with lambda this time;):

group = lambda t, n: zip(*[t[i::n] for i in range(n)])

group([1, 2, 3, 3], 2)

gives:

[(1, 2), (3, 4)]
share|improve this answer
    
nice, but not quite right, what I needed was to iterate in pairs, but with repetition of the elements and wrapping, for your example the output should be [(1,2),(2,3),(3,4),(4,1)] –  fortran Feb 10 '10 at 8:12
i=(range(10))

for x in len(i):
    print i[:2]
    i=i[1:]+[i[1]]

more pythonic than this is impossible

share|improve this answer
5  
I hope you are joking... –  fortran Jan 4 '11 at 15:28

Here's a version that supports an optional start index (for example to return (4, 0) as the first pair, use start = -1:

import itertools

def iterrot(lst, start = 0):

    if start == 0:
        i = iter(lst)
    elif start > 0:
        i1 = itertools.islice(lst, start, None)
        i2 = itertools.islice(lst, None, start)
        i = itertools.chain(i1, i2)
    else:
        # islice doesn't support negative slice indices so...
        lenl = len(lst)
        i1 = itertools.islice(lst, lenl + start, None)
        i2 = itertools.islice(lst, None, lenl + start)
        i = itertools.chain(i1, i2)
    return i


def iterpairs(lst, start = 0):

    i = iterrot(lst, start)     

    first = prev = i.next()
    for item in i:
        yield prev, item
        prev = item
    yield prev, first


def itertrios(lst, start = 0):

    i = iterrot(lst, start)     

    first = prevprev = i.next()
    second = prev = i.next()
    for item in i:
        yield prevprev, prev, item
        prevprev, prev = prev, item

    yield prevprev, prev, first
    yield prev, first, second
share|improve this answer
def pairs(ex_list):
    for i, v in enumerate(ex_list):
        if i < len(list) - 1:
            print v, ex_list[i+1]
        else:
            print v, ex_list[0]

Enumerate returns a tuple with the index number and the value. I print the value and the following element of the list ex_list[i+1]. The if i < len(list) - 1 means if v is not the last member of the list. If it is: print v and the first element of the list print v, ex_list[0].

Edit:

You can make it return a list. Just append the printed tuples to a list and return it.

def pairs(ex_list):
    result = []
    for i, v in enumerate(ex_list):
        if i < len(list) - 1:
            result.append((v, ex_list[i+1]))
        else:
            result.append((v, ex_list[0]))
    return result
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain your answer please ? –  Stephan May 15 '13 at 14:31

Of course, you can always use a deque:

from collections import deque
from itertools import *

def pairs(lst, n=2):
    itlst = iter(lst)
    start = list(islice(itlst, 0, n-1))
    deq = deque(start, n)
    for elt in chain(itlst, start):
        deq.append(elt)
        yield list(deq)
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