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I am working with the debug information. I am trying to write kind of like a "debug information parser", I am using DWARF and ELF libraries to do this, but they do not offer anything besides information of the memory space, I am trying to get the data in that memory space. I am hooked to the program. I am using a tool called Pin, so I am actually running the code inside the other program.. That is why I have access to its variables.

Assuming I have a pointer to an address, I want to get all the data that is stored in that address and the next 4 bytes (for example).

As an example, let's say I have an address 0xDEADBEEF and I want to go through the next 4 bytes starting from that address and read the data (dereference the pointer on each byte)

I am relatively new to C, and what I am attempting to do is:

char * address = "0xDEADBEEF";
unsigned int bytesize = 4;

ptr = (void *) address;
ptr_limit = ptr + bytesize;

for(ptr; ptr < ptr_limit; ptr++)
     cout << ptr;

I know this might be completely wrong, and I am getting a lot of compiling errors, but it is just to show a bit of the logic I am trying to use...

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Are you trying to write a debugger? –  therefromhere Sep 24 '12 at 23:35
    
@therefromhere nope, but I am working with the debug information. I am trying to write kind of like a "debug information parser", I am using DWARF and ELF libraries to do this, but they do not offer anything besides information of the memory space, I am trying to get the data in that memory space –  attis Sep 24 '12 at 23:36
    
C and C++ are different languages, please let us know which one you are working in. Also, what is the type of ptr and ptr_limit? –  Mooing Duck Sep 24 '12 at 23:45
    
I am using both C and C++ for a tool called Pin and for reading the ELF and DWARF libraries. ptr and ptr_limit are just void pointers, but I can change them and make them whatever type I need them to be –  attis Sep 24 '12 at 23:49
    
For one thing, "0xDEADBEEF" is not an address, nor a number. 0xDEADBEEF is a number though. Try that. –  Linuxios Sep 25 '12 at 0:33

4 Answers 4

OK, C and C++ are low level, but they aren't the wild west. You aren't allowed to just make up an address and access it. You aren't allowed to do that in assembly on most OSs; this is where SegFaults come from.

The way you get memory is to allocate it. This process involves telling the OS that you want a piece of memory of some size. At which point, the OS does its stuff so that you can access a certain range of virtual memory. Attempts to access memory outside of this range (or any range that the OS has allowed you to access) will cause the OS to terminate your program.

In C, you generally use malloc/calloc/realloc to allocate memory and free to tell the OS that you're done with it. C++ uses new to allocate objects and delete to deallocate them.

I am trying to write kind of like a "debug information parser", I am using DWARF and ELF libraries to do this, but they do not offer anything besides information of the memory space, I am trying to get the data in that memory space

It'd be great if you put things like that in your question.

In any case, you're talking about accessing someone else's memory, which is not done. Well, it's not permitted by the rules of standard C and C++. The various OSs have calls that can allow you to map some address space of another processes onto yours. But that's much more complex and OS-specific.

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Well, the memory is already allocated. What I am doing is using the DWARF library to get the addresses of a bunch of variables, and also the byte size of each variable. But sometimes I encounter structures and array of characters. I have no problems dereferencing integers because I just dereference the pointer and use an int variable to read it, but I am trying to dereference bigger variables and that is what I got the size for.. –  attis Sep 24 '12 at 23:41
    
@attis: "Well, the memory is already allocated." Is it allocated in your process? It's very unclear exactly what you're doing here. Are we talking about touching someone else's memory, or are you reading the ELF and DWARF files and trying to do something based on that? –  Nicol Bolas Sep 24 '12 at 23:43
    
I am reading the ELF and DWARF files and trying to get the data from the memory addresses that I got from them. –  attis Sep 24 '12 at 23:46
1  
@attis: Each program has it's own address space. If the other program allocates a char at address 0xDEADBEEF and you read a char at the address 0xDEADBEEF, you will not see their data, it is a different place in memory. –  Mooing Duck Sep 24 '12 at 23:47
    
@MooingDuck I am hooked to the program. I am using a tool called Pin, so I am actually running the code inside the other program.. That is why I have access to its variables.. –  attis Sep 24 '12 at 23:50

A memory address is an integer type (read number).
In your example, you have a char * (read string).

The following code:

char * address = "0xDEADBEEF";
void * ptr     = ( void * )address;

will just put the address of that char * variable, as a void *, into p.
It won't set the pointer to memory address 0xDEADBEEF.

If you want to access that specific memory location (assuming you know what you are doing), you'll need something like:

void * ptr = ( void * )0xDEADBEEF;

I said "assuming you know what you are doing", because accessing such a specific address will eventually result in a segfault, since you basically don't know such an address is in your address space, unless you're doing stuff in ring 0 (read kernel), for instance, with DMA.
But then I would assume you know a pointer is a number, not a string...

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Well I have the address stored as a decimal number in an unsigned int, I just wanted to use a char * in that example to work with a hexadecimal value and show you that it is an address.. It is not a random address, it is an address I have access to. It is from a variable from a program I hooked up to ptrace and I got all the debug information from that program using DWARF –  attis Sep 24 '12 at 23:45

The code can be pretty simple:

char *address, *limit;

for(address = (char *)0xdeadbeef, limit = address+4; address < limit; address++)
     cout << *address;

Note, however, that while converting an arbitrary integer to an address is allowed, the result of using the resulting pointer isn't (even close to) portable. Based on your comment (that you're getting addresses via debug information) so the addresses you're getting should be valid, the result should normally work (there's just no guarantee of it being portable).

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This was exactly what I was thinking on, but whenever I dereference the address variable I am not getting the data but the actual address. So what that is printing is just the address but not the data.. –  attis Sep 24 '12 at 23:59
    
@attis: That's because you started with the address in a string. When you do char *whatever = "whatever";, you'r initializing the pointer to point at that string, so when your print out characters, you print out the content of the string. In the case above, I haven't used a string, but an int constant. If you have to start with a string, use something like strtol to convert to an integer first. –  Jerry Coffin Sep 25 '12 at 0:12
    
Yes I knew that, I was just trying to look for a way to cast the string to an int cause it gave me compilation errors, but that function works fine! Thanks a lot.. @JerryCoffin –  attis Sep 25 '12 at 0:27

store your address as DWORD => DWORD address = 0xDEADBEEF then cast this address to pointer => void *ptr = (void *)address

here is a example:

char *pointer = "FOO";
DWORD address = (DWORD)pointer;
printf("0x%u\n", address);
printf("%s\n", (char *)address); // prints FOO

address++; //move 1 byte
printf("%s\n", (char *)address); // prints OO
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