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I was playing with ptrdiff_t and reading the C++11 standard when I came across this "issue". First, the facts:

The type ptrdiff_t (just an example) is pulled from the Standard C library header <stddef.h> into <cstddef> (§18.2/2). Section 17.6.1.2 tells us that declarations pulled from the C standard library will be within the std namespace:

In the C++ standard library, however, the declarations (except for names which are defined as macros in C) are within namespace scope (3.3.6) of the namespace std. It is unspecified whether these names are first declared within the global namespace scope and are then injected into namespace std by explicit using-declarations (7.3.3).

As it also says, the declarations may have been declared in global namespace first and then injected into std. So it would make sense, for my implementation, that the following compiles just fine:

#include <cstddef>

int main(int argc, const char* argv[])
{
  std::ptrdiff_t x;
  ptrdiff_t y;
  return 0;
}

My implementation (gcc 4.6.3) must have declared ptrdiff_t in the global namespace and then injected it into std. However, if I compile the following code, I get an error (notice the <iostream> include):

#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, const char* argv[])
{
  std::ptrdiff_t x;
  ptrdiff_t y;
  return 0;
}

main.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, const char**)’:
main.cpp:6:3: error: ‘ptrdiff_t’ was not declared in this scope
main.cpp:6:3: note: suggested alternatives:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/i686-linux-gnu/./bits/c++config.h:156:28: note: ‘std::ptrdiff_t’

So, since std::ptrdiff_t is available, <iostream> must be including <cstddef> in some way (although it's not required to). But why is the global version not also available as it was before? Can I not expect this injection to be consistent even when it's actually the same header? This seems like odd behaviour. Whether the injection occurs may be unspecified, but it should at least be either one way or the other, not both, right?

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1  
Unspecified means unspecified. Who's to say that there isn't a header with all the typedefs declared directly in namespace std, then cstdlib includes both stdlib.h and said header? (Presumably in this scenario cstddef includes stddef.h to avoid breaking code erroneously using types from the global namespace, and iostream only includes said header rather than cstddef in order to avoid polluting the global namespace.) –  ildjarn Sep 25 '12 at 0:01
    
Why not just include cstddef? –  szx Sep 25 '12 at 0:15
    
@ildjarn Perhaps. I don't think your idea would match the requirement that cstddef must either declare in std or declare globally and inject into std. In your example, everything would be separately declared in both namespaces. I'm probably too close to the edge of how specific the standard can be. –  Joseph Mansfield Sep 25 '12 at 0:22
    
@asd Of course, I would do usually. It's just something that I came across that I wondered about. –  Joseph Mansfield Sep 25 '12 at 0:23
    
@sftrabbit : Where do you see that requirement? The standard doesn't say anything concrete except that "the declarations are within namespace scope of the namespace std". What mechanism is used to achieve that is, again, unspecified. –  ildjarn Sep 25 '12 at 0:31

2 Answers 2

Do not rely on one header including another, if you want something declared/defined in a specific header then you must include it.

For the example you gave, with g++ there are actually two definitions of ptrdiff_t (and size_t for that matter). The first, in namespace std, that comes from <bits/c++config.h>. And the one in the global namespace from <stddef.h> (and so <cstddef>).

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The problem is that you did not using the correct header. You should do

     #include <cstddef>

instead. However you use

        #include<iostream>

And that has a definition of "std::ptrdiff_t" in it indirectly. However, the global "::ptrdiff_t" is not defined in "iostream" and "iostream" did not include "cstddef" as you thought. Instead, "iostream" does include "bits/c++config.h". The actual "std::ptrdiff_t" is defined in that file.

If you look at the content of the file "cstddef" you will find that is is only two "useful" lines there

BTW, the above discussion is for GCC 4.6 and GCC 4.7. For GCC 4.4, "iostream" indrectly include "cstddef" therefore ptrdiff_t will be available in both namespaces (std and global). #include #include

The latter line brings in the global "::ptrdiff_t" and the former defines the std namespace one.

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