Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having trouble building a binary tree in C. I'm suppose to be able to add books to the tree where books with a later publishing year get added to the left and earlier publishing year gets added to the right. I keep getting a run error and i'm not really sure why.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


struct book { 
    char* name; 
    int year;
};

typedef struct tnode { 
    struct book *aBook; 
    struct tnode *left; 
    struct tnode *right;
} BTree;

BTree* addBook(BTree* nodeP, char* name, int year){
    if( nodeP == NULL )
    {
        nodeP = (struct tnode*) malloc( sizeof( struct tnode ) );
        (nodeP->aBook)->year = year;
        (nodeP->aBook)->name = name;
        /* initialize the children to null */
        (nodeP)->left = NULL;    
        (nodeP)->right = NULL;  
    }
    else if(year > (nodeP->aBook)->year)
    {
        addBook(&(nodeP)->left,name,year );
    }
    else if(year < (nodeP->aBook)->year)
    {
        addBook(&(nodeP)->right,name,year );
    }
    return nodeP;
}

void freeBTree(BTree* books)
{
    if( books != NULL )
    {
        freeBTree(books->left);
        freeBTree(books->right);
        //free( books );
    }
}

void printBooks(BTree* books){
    if(books != NULL){

    }
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    BTree *head;
    head = addBook(head,"The C Programming Language", 1990);
    /*addBook(head,"JavaScript, The Good Parts",2008);
    addBook(head,"Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example", 2000);
    addBook(head,"Scala for the impatient",2012);*/
}
share|improve this question
3  
"I keep getting a run error " - the suspense is killing me.... –  Mitch Wheat Sep 24 '12 at 23:53
    
It's probably a SEGFAULT. In which case, run your program with valgrind or similar and you should be able to properly debug it. –  Richard J. Ross III Sep 24 '12 at 23:54
    
in the beginning, head points to random memory. try BTree *head = NULL; and then start adding books. –  esskar Sep 24 '12 at 23:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One problem is that you aren't initializing to NULL:

BTree *head;

should be

BTree *head = NULL;

I would recommend setting your compiler warnings higher. Your two recursive calls are not right and the compiler should have warned about them:

addBook(&(nodeP)->left,name,year );

should be:

addBook( nodeP->left,name,year );

from a parameter passing standpoint. However, this function won't work as it is right now since you are adding when the node pointer is NULL, which means you can't attach a parent to a child since the parent pointer node is gone. I think the logic should look at the applicable right/left node and if NULL, add right there in the routine, else call recursively till a node is found that has a NULL right/left pointer.

Something like this:

BTree *makeNode(char *name, int year)
{
   // NOTE: 3 frees required for every node
   BTree *nodeP = malloc( sizeof( struct tnode ) );  // 1
   nodeP->aBook = malloc( sizeof(struct book) );     // 2
   (nodeP->aBook)->year = year;
   (nodeP->aBook)->name = malloc(strlen(name) + 1);  // 3
   strcpy((nodeP->aBook)->name,name);
   /* initialize the children to null */
   nodeP->left = NULL;    
   nodeP->right = NULL;  
   return nodeP;
}

BTree* addBook(BTree* nodeP, char* name, int year)
{
    if ( nodeP == NULL )
    {
        nodeP = makeNode(name,year);
    }
    else if (year > (nodeP->aBook)->year)
    {
       if ( nodeP->left == NULL )
          nodeP->left = makeNode(name,year);
       else
          addBook( nodeP->left,name,year );
    }
    else if(year < (nodeP->aBook)->year)
    {
       if ( nodeP->right == NULL )
          nodeP->right = makeNode(name,year);
       else
          addBook( nodeP->right,name,year );
    }
    return nodeP;
}

void printBooks(BTree* books) 
{
    if (books != NULL) {
       printf("book: %s %d\n",books->aBook->name,books->aBook->year);
       printBooks(books->right);
       printBooks(books->left);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You're trying to access an uninitalized pointer nodeP->aBook:

nodeP = (struct tnode*) malloc( sizeof( struct tnode ) );
(nodeP->aBook)->year = year;
  • You have to allocate space with malloc.
  • or, store the data directly in the node (with a struct, and not a pointer to a struct).
share|improve this answer
    
im new to c so I'm not really sure what that means but isn't that what is already happening there with that malloc statement? –  user1179321 Sep 25 '12 at 0:18
    
no, there you're only allocating space for a struct tnode, which (among other things) contains a struct book pointer, which is initially contains some garbage (= points to some random location in the memory). –  Karoly Horvath Sep 25 '12 at 1:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.