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I am inserting a row into my table and while I select data from it using the same cursor, it works fine. But when I try view it by other means or create a new cursor, it seems to magically disappear. Here is what I mean:

>>> cur = MySQLdb.connect(user='alex', db='testing').cursor()
>>> target = 'Alex'
>>> cur.execute("""INSERT INTO user_data (nick, points) VALUES (%s, 100);""", (target.lower()))
1L
>>> cur.execute("""SELECT points FROM user_data WHERE nick = %s;""", (target.lower()))
1L
>>> total = str(cur.fetchone()[0])
>>> print total
100
>>> cur = MySQLdb.connect(user='alex', db='testing').cursor()
>>> cur.execute("""SELECT points FROM user_data WHERE nick = %s;""", (target.lower()))
0L
>>> total = str(cur.fetchone()[0])
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute '__getitem__'
>>> 

Can anyone tell me why MySQLdb is doing this?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe that your problem is that you're not committing your transaction. Try to call commit() after your insert.

That is, you have to do

conn = MySQLdb.connect(user='alex', db='testing')
cur = conn.cursor()
cur.execute("""INSERT INTO user_data (nick, points) VALUES (%s, 100);""", (target.lower()))
conn.commit()
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You should read about ACID, which is supported by MySQL when using InnoDB for example.

What you're experiencing is the Isolation property: your two connections have opened two distinct transactions (by doing this MySQLdb.connect(user='alex', db='testing').cursor() twice, you're doing more than creating two cursors, you're creating two connections too). You'd need to commit a transaction before opening a new one if you want the changes to be visible in subsequent transactions.

It's also generally worth reading the chapter on InnoDB's transaction model (or the one for the engine you're using).

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