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Here is I what I am doing, basically sort an array of dynamically generated C-Strings, it's going to be a combination of "abc", and the length is less than 5 for the sake of brevity. What is confusing/interesting is how to configure the compare function so it won't compare the C-strings by memory addresses

srand ( time(NULL) );
char alpha[] = "abc";
char** CString = new char*[either 5 or 1000];
unsigned int j=0;
for (unsigned int i=0; i<either 5 or 1000;i++) {
    int ran = rand() % 5 + 2;
    CString[i] = new char[ran];
    for(j=0;j<ran-1;j++){
        CString[i][j] = alpha[rand() % (sizeof(alpha) - 1)];
    }
    CString[i][ran-1] = '\0';
}

std::sort(CString,CString+either 5 or 1000,SortCompare);

for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
    std::cout << *(CString+i) << " at " << CString+i << std::endl;
}

now I have three configurations for the compare function

int SortCompare(char* a,  char* b){
    //return a<b;
    //return *a<*b;
    //return strcmp(a,b);
}

and the printout was

return strcmp(a,b):
CRASHED! //bummed because I had high hope for this

return a<b:
(when 5 C-strings):                        (when 1000 C-strings):
abba at 001F3248                           cbccb at 00544388 
bcb at 001F324C                            caac at 0054438C
cbb at 001F3250                            bcbc at 00544390
c at 001F3254                              ac at 00544394
ca at 001F3258                             a at 00544398
//conclusion: it's sorted by addresses. so turning head to the other one

return *a<*b:
(when 5 C-strings):                        (when 1000 C-strings):
abba at 001F3248                           cbccb at 00544388
bcb at 001F324C                            caac at 0054438C
cbb at 001F3250                            bcbc at 00544390
c at 001F3254                              ac at 00544394
ca at 001F3258                             a at 00544398
//I assumed it's value-sorted              //seriously hurt, belief has been destroyed seeing the memory addresses line up so neatly

Therefore, which one is the correct version to sort by value? Or I am totally on a wrong track. Needed a life guard! Thanks

share|improve this question
    
You're using the stl::sort yet you're not using std::vector<char*> to store your strings or even std::vector<char> to store each string. Why? –  Borgleader Sep 25 '12 at 0:30
    
Well, I tried vector, it worked, but I was like here is an idea, now here I am. By the way, since STL is generic,I assumed it should work with this configuration,right? –  Cong Hui Sep 25 '12 at 0:32
1  
Or better yet, using std::string... why are you using raw C-style strings? –  Cornstalks Sep 25 '12 at 0:32
1  
@ClintHui: performance argument is dubious, plus it doesn't matter how much faster it is if it doesn't work! –  Joe Sep 25 '12 at 0:35
2  
I assume the crash was actually an assertion informing you that your sorter did not produce a strict weak ordering criterion (both positive and negative numbers will produce true whereas only negative numbers should). Once you call strcmp correctly, I suspect the "crash" will go away. :-] –  ildjarn Sep 25 '12 at 0:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you never have any NULL pointers:

bool SortCompare(char const* const a, char const* const b)
{
    return std::strcmp(a, b) < 0;
}

If you do have NULL pointers, it's only slightly more verbose:

bool SortCompare(char const* const a, char const* const b)
{
    return a && (!b || std::strcmp(a, b) < 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
OMG! do you care to shed some lights on the arguments? why is that? Thank you –  Cong Hui Sep 25 '12 at 0:43
    
@ClintHui : I'm not sure what needs explaining -- std::sort requires a comparitor that induces a strict weak ordering. For simple lexicographical sorting, simple a < b criteria suffices, and strcmp returns less than 0 if its first argument is less than its second. –  ildjarn Sep 25 '12 at 0:49
    
I meant the argument, (char const* const a, char const* const b), what is the second const doing? why is it there? Thanks –  Cong Hui Sep 25 '12 at 0:50
    
@ClintHui : The second const is not strictly required, but I put it there for matters of basic const-correctness. What it's doing is declaring (for human readers) and enforcing (for the compiler) that you will not change the values of a or b. –  ildjarn Sep 25 '12 at 0:51
1  
Changing the values of a or b would have no effect, since they're copies anyway, so it doesn't really do anything in this case, or even in most cases. It's just like taking int const a as an argument. But when you're writing a complicated function that has a return a on line 137, it's useful to know that you're returning exactly the same value that was passed in, and that's what int const a or char const * const a guarantees. –  abarnert Sep 25 '12 at 1:01

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