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I have a school assignment, and everything works just fine except for one part, which I cannot figure out. The following is the snippet of code where my issue is occurring:

    //something goes wrong here, wont copy over
    puts("bravo");
    //add to end of the list
    int size_list = sizeof(environ);
    //char** tmp_ptr = ( char** )calloc( size_list + 1, ( size_list + 1 ) * sizeof( char* ) );
    char** tmp_ptr = ( char** ) malloc ( ( size_list + 1 ) * sizeof( char* ) );
    int k;
    for ( k = 0; k < size_list; ++k )
    {
        tmp_ptr[k] = environ[k];
        //memcpy(tmp_ptr[k],environ[k],sizeof(environ[k]));
    }
    //char** tmp_ptr= (char**)realloc(*environ, size_list+2);
    environ = tmp_ptr;
    environ[size_list] = (char*)malloc(len_string+1);
    strcpy(environ[size_list],full_string);
    return 1;

You can ignore the "bravo", it was for me to locate where the problem was occurring. I am trying to get environ to have the new list of variables, but when I set it equal to tmp_ptr, it is empty. I'm pretty sure that the values are getting copied over, but I do not know what is wrong. Does the data in tmp_ptr get deleted when the function ends? Is that a possible explanation? How can I properly allocate and copy over the memory. I tried using realloc, but that gave me invalid pointer errors, so I am relying on calloc or malloc. Thanks in advance.

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Can you provide a full C program that is compilable that shows your issue - there is too much info missing eg what is environ? Oh and sizeof returns an unsigned number –  Adrian Cornish Sep 25 '12 at 1:28
    
Note that t = strdup(s) is a quicker alternative to t = malloc(strlen(s)+1); strcpy(t, s). –  nneonneo Sep 25 '12 at 1:39
1  
the full C code is like 250 lines. extern char **environ; is the environmental variable on unix/linux systems. size_list is just sizeof(environ) and len_string is the length of full_string which is a cstring or rather another environmental variable that I want to add to the end of environ. –  Michael M Sep 25 '12 at 1:40
    
@nneonneo, keep in mind that strdup isn't ISO C, it's POSIX. There's a good chance it's available however. –  paxdiablo Sep 25 '12 at 1:43
    
I do want to ask: what do you mean by "it becomes empty"? Does your entire environment get wiped out, or only the string you set? –  nneonneo Sep 25 '12 at 1:51

2 Answers 2

environ's length isn't sizeof(environ), since environ is a char ** (and thus sizeof(environ) is 4 or 8 depending on your platform). What you're doing is effectively wiping out most of environ because you only copy the first few entries.

To find out how many entries are in environ, do

int cnt = 0;
char **envp = environ;
while(*envp++) cnt++;

I should also note a problem with the approach: since environ is a NULL-terminated string array (not to be confused with 'null-terminated string'), you have to replace the NULL at the end with your own entry, then add a new NULL after your new entry. Currently, your code (if it calculated the size correctly) would have added your entry after the NULL, and would have not been visible to the program.

Side note: messing with environ this way is definitely not recommended. Use getenv/setenv instead; if you need to mass-set the environment, try using execve instead. (So, in your case, you can simply setenv("varname", "varvalue", 1) to add varname=varvalue to the environment (and replace an existing mapping to varname if it is already set).

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2  
environ is a standard libc pointer to the environment. See mkssoftware.com/docs/man5/environ.5.asp. –  nneonneo Sep 25 '12 at 1:34
2  
He's certainly using it like environ. Even if it's not "the" environ, it's a pointer of some sort (since tmp_ptr[k] = environ[k] and environ = tmp_ptr work). –  nneonneo Sep 25 '12 at 1:36
2  
"extern char **environ; is the environmental variable on unix/linux systems.". happy now? :P –  nneonneo Sep 25 '12 at 1:42
1  
Bad bad BAD downvote. –  Jim Balter Sep 25 '12 at 1:47
1  
@AdrianCornish: If you think OP is being stupid and redefining environ, you should add it as an answer. Otherwise, it is not meaningful to downvote for giving a best-effort guess based on the evidence. –  nneonneo Sep 25 '12 at 1:49

environ is a pointer, meaning that sizeof(environ) is not the number of items in that array. Rather, it's the size of the pointer, probably four or eight in your case.

If environ is the same sort of structure as argv (an array of character pointers where the last one is a null pointer), you will need to determine its size by walking through the array until you find NULL.

Something like (untested, but the idea is sound):

char **envPtr = environ;
int size_list = 0;            // probably should be size_t
while (*envPtr != NULL) {
    envPtr++;
    size_list++;
}

You can see the effect in this complete program (with a few changes to get around some other bugs):

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define full_string "xyzzy=plugh"
#define len_string strlen(full_string)

int main (int argc, char **argv) {
    int k, size_list = sizeof(environ);
    char **tmp_ptr = malloc ((size_list + 1) * sizeof ( char*));

    for (k = 0; k < size_list; ++k) printf ("[%s]\n", environ[k]);
    for (k = 0; k < size_list; ++k) tmp_ptr[k] = environ[k];
    tmp_ptr[size_list] = NULL;

    environ = tmp_ptr;
    environ[size_list] = malloc (len_string + 1);
    strcpy(environ[size_list],full_string);

    printf ("=====\n");
    for (k = 0; k <= size_list; ++k) printf ("[%s]\n", environ[k]);

    return 0;
}

This outputs only four of my environment variables because I have four-byte pointers:

[ORBIT_SOCKETDIR=/tmp/orbit-pax]
[SSH_AGENT_PID=1978]
[GPG_AGENT_INFO=/tmp/seahorse-tNDhG9/S.gpg-agent:2005:1]
[TERM=xterm]
=====
[ORBIT_SOCKETDIR=/tmp/orbit-pax]
[SSH_AGENT_PID=1978]
[GPG_AGENT_INFO=/tmp/seahorse-tNDhG9/S.gpg-agent:2005:1]
[TERM=xterm]
[xyzzy=plugh]

Changing the code to correctly determine the size of the environment:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define full_string "xyzzy=plugh"
#define len_string strlen(full_string)

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int k, size_list = 0;
    char **envPtr = environ;
    while (*envPtr != NULL) {
        envPtr++;
        size_list++;
    }
    char **tmp_ptr = malloc ((size_list + 1) * sizeof (char*));

    for (k = 0; k < size_list; ++k) printf ("[%s]\n", environ[k]);
    for (k = 0; k < size_list; ++k) tmp_ptr[k] = environ[k];
    tmp_ptr[size_list] = NULL;

    environ = tmp_ptr;
    environ[size_list] = malloc (len_string + 1);
    strcpy(environ[size_list],full_string);

    printf ("=====\n");
    for (k = 0; k <= size_list; ++k) printf ("[%s]\n", environ[k]);

    return 0;
}

gives me the lot:

[ORBIT_SOCKETDIR=/tmp/orbit-pax]
[SSH_AGENT_PID=1978]
[GPG_AGENT_INFO=/tmp/seahorse-tNDhG9/S.gpg-agent:2005:1]
[TERM=xterm]
[SHELL=/bin/bash]
[GTK_RC_FILES=/etc/gtk/gtkrc:/home/pax/.gtkrc-1.2-gnome2]
[WINDOWID=62914564]
[GNOME_KEYRING_CONTROL=/tmp/keyring-RADe9n]
[GTK_MODULES=canberra-gtk-module]
[USER=pax]
:
[XAUTHORITY=/var/run/gdm3/auth-for-pax-AO1dYc/database]
[_=./testprog]
=====
[ORBIT_SOCKETDIR=/tmp/orbit-pax]
[SSH_AGENT_PID=1978]
[GPG_AGENT_INFO=/tmp/seahorse-tNDhG9/S.gpg-agent:2005:1]
[TERM=xterm]
[SHELL=/bin/bash]
[GTK_RC_FILES=/etc/gtk/gtkrc:/home/pax/.gtkrc-1.2-gnome2]
[WINDOWID=62914564]
[GNOME_KEYRING_CONTROL=/tmp/keyring-RADe9n]
[GTK_MODULES=canberra-gtk-module]
[USER=pax]
:
[XAUTHORITY=/var/run/gdm3/auth-for-pax-AO1dYc/database]
[_=./testprog]
[xyzzy=plugh]

For what it's worth, your code had the following problems:

  • The incorrect calculation of the environment size, obviously.
  • Casting the return value from malloc - this is ill-advised in C since it can cause code problems to be hidden from you.
  • Not setting the final element of the new list to NULL.
  • Not checking for out-of-memory conditions.

All these except the last are fixed in my final code sample above.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Adrian, the fact that OP is assigning tmp_ptr to environ, and the fact that environ is exactly that in a number of systems, makes it a safe bet it's the same type. In any case, I stated If enviriron is the same .... Perhaps you might consider a remedial reading course :-) –  paxdiablo Sep 25 '12 at 1:38
    
You are right - In that case - yes - upvoted again –  Adrian Cornish Sep 25 '12 at 1:47
    
Then, he should have at least seen 4 or 8 strings. but he sees nothing! –  Reza Goodarzi Sep 25 '12 at 1:50
    
I don't think that would be sufficient. –  Jim Balter Sep 25 '12 at 1:51
    
@Reza, I've punched in the code (though I had to add a couple of things to get it to compile) and I do indeed see four strings. My fix also changes that so that the entire environment is seen. See the answer update for details. –  paxdiablo Sep 25 '12 at 2:08

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