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I'm new to C, and I've been trying to figure out pointers.

This program works with -i but segfaults after a few lines and -f segfaults right away.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void search_and_print ( char pattern[], FILE* search_file );

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] ) {
        const char TOO_MANY_VARIABLES[] = "Too many arguments from the command line!";
        const char NOT_ENOUGH_VARIABLES[] = "\nUSAGE: a.out [-i] [-f filename] (Search Pattern)\n";

        if (argc < 2) { printf(NOT_ENOUGH_VARIABLES); return(1);}
        // If input
        if (strcmp(argv[1],"-i") == 0) {
                char *pattern = argv[2];
                search_and_print(pattern, stdin);
        }


        // If file
        if (strcmp(argv[1],"-f") == 0) {
                char *pattern = argv[3];
                // Check if file exists
                // Open file
                FILE *file = fopen( argv[2], "r" );
                search_and_print(pattern, file);
                fclose( file );
        }

}

void search_and_print ( char pattern[], FILE* search_file ) {
        // Read through file
        const int MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE = 1000;
        char* line[MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE];
        while  ( fgets(*line, MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE, search_file) != NULL )
                if  ( strstr(*line, pattern) != NULL )
                    printf(*line);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Your fgets call is wrong. First parameter should be line, not *line. What compiler are you using that doesn't complain about this? Same with strstr - first parameter should be line, not *line. –  Joe Sep 25 '12 at 2:12
2  
char* line[MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE]; That's a lot of pointers. –  ta.speot.is Sep 25 '12 at 2:14
    
Gcc, and gcc complains when I write line without the asterix. –  asperous.us Sep 25 '12 at 2:14
1  
beware of things like char *pattern = argv[3]; without first checking arcgc - how do you know that there are 3 arguments? –  Mawg Sep 25 '12 at 2:15
1  
What @ta.speot is rying to say is that you should declared a fixed size character arry char line[MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE]; (no *) Or you should declare a pointer char* line; and then allocate memory for it using malloc() –  Mawg Sep 25 '12 at 2:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have quite a few bugs here.

char* line[MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE];

defines an array of 1000 pointers, not characters. fgets(*line, ... passes the first of those pointers, which is uninitialized, to fgets, most likely causing a segvio.

printf(*line);

The first argument to printf is a format. Never ever pass user input as the format, as this opens a huge security hole in your program ... see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncontrolled_format_string

You should use fputs(line) or printf("%s", line) (once you fix the declaration of line).

int main

You don't return a value (except in the error case) ... that results undefined behavior.

FILE *file = fopen( argv[2], "r" );

You should check whether this succeeds. If the file can't be opened (e.g., it doesn't exist), passing it to fgets results in undefined behavior.

if (argc < 2) { printf(NOT_ENOUGH_VARIABLES); return(1);}

This test isn't sufficient for your -f case.

share|improve this answer

you don't need

char* line[MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE]; 

this is a pointer to arrays (maybe useful if you want to store the file or input line by line) and you haven't allocated it first. so the seg fault is quite obvious.

change your search_and_print to this:

void search_and_print ( char pattern[], FILE* search_file ) {
        // Read through file
        const int MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE = 1000;
        char line[MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE];
        while  ( fgets(line, MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE, search_file) != NULL )
                if  ( strstr(line, pattern) != NULL )
                    printf("%s\n", line);
}

additional to Jim Balter's very good advices, also I would suggest using getopt for parsing your parameters.

share|improve this answer

For future reference for anyone, here is the code with the suggested changes that seems to work. Thanks again for the help!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void search_and_print ( char pattern[], FILE* search_file );
int usage(const char* err);

const char USAGE[] =
                "\nUSAGE: a.out [-i] [-f filename] (Search Pattern)";

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] ) {
        const char TOO_MANY_VARIABLES[] = "Too many arguments from the command line!";


        if (argc < 2) return usage("Not enough options");
        if (argc > 4) return usage("Too many arguments from the command line!");

        // If input
        if (strcmp(argv[1],"-i") == 0) {
                if (argc > 2) {
                        char *pattern = argv[2];
                        search_and_print(pattern, stdin);
                }
                else {
                        printf("Need a pattern to search by!");
                        return 1;
                }
        }

        // If file
        if (strcmp(argv[1],"-f") == 0) {
                if (argc > 3)   {
                        char *pattern = argv[3];
                        // Open file
                        FILE *file = fopen( argv[2], "r" );
                        // Check if file exists
                        if ( file != NULL) {
                                search_and_print(pattern, file);
                                fclose( file );
                        } else {
                                printf("File not found!");
                                return 1;
                        }
                } else {
                        printf("Need a pattern to search by!");
                        return 1;
                }
        }
        return 0;
}

int usage(const char* err) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s\n%s\n", err, USAGE);
        return 1;
}

void search_and_print ( char pattern[], FILE* search_file ) {
        const int MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE = 1000;
        char line[MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE];
        // Read through file
        while  ( fgets(line, MAX_CHARACTERS_PER_LINE, search_file) != NULL )
                if  ( strstr(line, pattern) != NULL )
                    printf("%s", line);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You want to add \n to your error printf strings, and you should consider writing them to stderr (with fprintf) instead of stdout. Also, I advise omitting the parentheses around the return value because they aren't needed and they make return look like a function when it isn't, it's a keyword. There's no point in adding extra text that detracts from rather than enhances readability. And you should print an error if neither -i nor -f is given. (Tanuki's suggestion of using getopt is a good one ... it's no big deal with just two options, but in the long run it saves effort.) –  Jim Balter Sep 25 '12 at 3:49
    
P.S. I notice that NOT_ENOUGH_VARIABLES[] is actually a usage message. Consider renaming that to USAGE[], moving it to file level, and adding a function like void usage(const char* err) { fprintf(stderr, "%s\n%s\n", err, USAGE); exit(1); } and then calling that with the various error messages instead of the explicit printf/return(1) you have now. Moving common work into functions is a fundamental programming principle that saves effort, produces consistency, and reduces bugs. –  Jim Balter Sep 25 '12 at 4:00

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