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I'd like to parce a CSS file and add before every CSS selector another selector.

From:

p{margin:0 0 10px;}
.lead{margin-bottom:20px;font-size:21px;font-weight:200;line-height:30px;}

I'd like:

.mySelector p{margin:0 0 10px;}
.mySelector .lead{margin-bottom:20px;font-size:21px;font-weight:200;line-height:30px;}

But my CSS file is really complex (in fact it is the bootstrap css file) so the regex should match all CSS selectors.

For now I have this regex:

([^\r\n,{};]+)(,|{)

and you can see the result here http://regexr.com?328ps but as you can see there are a lot of matches that shouldn't match

for example:

text-shadow:0 -1px 0 rgba(0,

matchs positive but it shouldn't

Does someone have a solution ?

THX

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You could use SCSS to do this job. –  Gumbo Sep 25 '12 at 3:39
1  
Um, CSS selector syntax is quite complicated. You might want to simplify your problem. –  Raymond Chen Sep 25 '12 at 3:40

5 Answers 5

There isn't one. CSS selectors are not an example of a "Regular Language" and so cannot be parsed by a Regular Expression. You will need to build your own parser based on the CSS grammar specification: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-syntax/#detailed-grammar

CSS is described as an LL(1) grammar, so you're probably better off using a tool like Yacc to generate your parser for you.

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+1 It's very rare to see a correct answer on this kind of question. –  Paulpro Sep 25 '12 at 3:40
    
@ascii-lime I paid attention during the Languages and Grammar courses in school - but I've completely forgotten how to work with LALR now :( –  Dai Sep 25 '12 at 3:42
1  
The fact that a language isn't regular doesn't always mean you can't parse it with a regular expression. The reason is that modern regular expression implementations have more advanced features now that allow you to dive into slightly more complex language. For example, balanced matching... blogs.msdn.com/b/bclteam/archive/2005/03/15/396452.aspx –  Steve Wortham Sep 25 '12 at 13:20
    
Brilliant answer. –  Sander Jan 31 '13 at 10:28
2  
While the answer is technically correct (upvote!), the OP probably didn't necessarily want a parser that would handle every nuance of the CSS specification (which, as you say, is not a regular language). It is possible to write a regular expression (or two) to handle 99% of real-world CSS to accomplish the OP's needs (as evidenced below). –  Ethan Brown Jul 2 '13 at 0:55
up vote 7 down vote accepted

So I've finally found a REGEX that works for my requirements

([^\r\n,{}]+)(,(?=[^}]*{)|\s*{)

The key point was to add a Positive lookahead to avoid bad matches

(?=[^}]*{)

You can see the result here: http://regexr.com?328s7

The only precaution that I can recommend is to remove every block comment:

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So finally I've found a way better way to do it.

I use a LESS editor (eg: http://lesstester.com/)

and simply nest my whole css file: .mySelector{ your css here }

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A simple and readable regex is blow:

[\#\.\w\-\,\s\n\r\t:]+(?=\s*\{)

you can test it on css code in this tool`

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It's true that you can not select css selectors using regex, but you can select css rules using regex, so you can make the job done in the inverse way:

  1. format css file in order to no have selectors and rules in the same line. your code should look like this:

    p{
    margin:0 0 10px;
    }
    .lead{
    margin-bottom:20px;
    font-size:21px;
    font-weight:200;
    line-height:30px;
    }

  2. select all rules (regex : (^(.)*;)

    p{
    margin:0 0 10px;
    }
    .lead{
    margin-bottom:20px;
    font-size:21px;
    font-weight:200;
    line-height:30px;

    }

  3. add some prefix to rules (example ####)

    p{
    ####margin:0 0 10px;
    }
    .lead{
    ####margin-bottom:20px;
    ####font-size:21px;
    ####font-weight:200;
    ####line-height:30px;

    }

  4. select all lines not beginning with ####,not a return to line, and not a } (regex : ^[^#### \n }])

    p{
    ####margin:0 0 10px;
    }
    .lead{
    ####margin-bottom:20px;
    ####font-size:21px;
    ####font-weight:200;
    ####line-height:30px;
    }

  5. add your css prefix

    .my_class_prefix p{
    ####margin:0 0 10px;
    }
    .my_class_prefix .lead{
    ####margin-bottom:20px;
    ####font-size:21px;
    ####font-weight:200;
    ####line-height:30px;
    }

  6. delete the added prefix ####

    .my_class_prefix p{
    margin:0 0 10px;
    }
    .my_class_prefix .lead{
    margin-bottom:20px;
    font-size:21px;
    font-weight:200;
    line-height:30px;
    }

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Your answer would be much improved if you added some concrete examples. Please edit your accordingly. –  kkuilla Sep 16 at 15:35

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