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At compile time in C++11 in a template function that takes 2 template parameters, both of which must be unsigned integer types, I'd like to have a local variable have the type of whichever of the two template parameters has more bits. In C++03 I might write something like:

template<bool, class T, class U>
struct pick_first;

template<class T, class U>
struct pick_first<true, T, U> {
    typedef T type;
};

template<class T, class U>
struct pick_first<false, T, U> {
    typedef U type;
};

template<class T, class U>
struct pick_bigger {
    typedef typename pick_first<(sizeof(T) >= sizeof(U)), T, U>::type type;
};

// usage
template<class uintX_t, class uintY_t>
void foo() {
    typename pick_bigger<uintX_t, uintY_t>::type mylocal = 0;
    // insert doing stuff with mylocal here
}

Can I leverage any of the new C++11 features to make this simpler? I know I could use variadic templates to make it work with more than just pairs of types, and instead of using pick_first I could write lots of specializations to make it work with the new int_leastX_t and int_fastX_t types. But I'm curious if there's just a plain better approach to this. Maybe somehow leveraging auto/constexpr/decltype?

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3  
Have you considered std::common_type –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 25 '12 at 3:48
    
I had not heard of std::common_type! Very interesting. This would work for me. You should post as an answer though so I can vote you up ;) –  Joseph Garvin Sep 25 '12 at 3:57
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas But common_type will not always work due to integer promotion rules. For instance, std::common_type<short,char>::type is int, which may be larger than either of the 2 types. –  Praetorian Sep 25 '12 at 4:18
    
The pick_first template seems to be aptly named. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 25 '12 at 4:21
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Oops, fixed. –  Joseph Garvin Sep 25 '12 at 4:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your pick_first is just std::conditional in C++11, so you could write

template<class T, class U>
struct wider {
    using type = typename std::conditional<sizeof(T) >= sizeof(U), T, U>::type; // I'm using the C++11 type alias feature 1) to educate people about them and 2) because I like them better than typedefs.
};

If you just want a type suitable for holding the result of some expression involving both types and don't necessarily need exactly one of the two types then std::common_type, or perhaps auto, is the best solution:

template<class uintX_t, class uintY_t>
void foo() {
    typename std::common_type<uintX_t, uintY_t>::type mylocal = 0;
    // insert doing stuff with mylocal here
}

// or
template<class uintX_t, class uintY_t>
void foo(uintX_t x, uintY_t y) {
    auto mylocal = x + y;
}

and your implementation of pick_bigger is missing a typename in there: typedef typename pick_first<(sizeof(T) >= sizeof(U)), T, U>::type type;

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This adds convoluted template magic, with code that doesn't compile with the most used compiler, in order to produce a sub-optimal type for the local variable that the OP wants a type for. That is extremely silly. But it does look clever. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 25 '12 at 8:08
    
Wow, wasn't aware of std::conditional either, sweet. –  Joseph Garvin Sep 25 '12 at 13:58
    
@JosephGarvin You might look at en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types to see all the new type traits. –  bames53 Sep 25 '12 at 15:36
    
@bames53: Yeah, I just read over those. I didn't realize any type_traits were added that weren't already in boost around the time of tr1, now I'm going over all sections there looking at the C++11 tagged pieces. –  Joseph Garvin Sep 25 '12 at 17:48
    
I added the missing typename –  Joseph Garvin Sep 25 '12 at 20:11

since both types are unsigned, just do decltype( T1() + T2() ).

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5  
This has the same problem with integer promotion as common_type, decltype(char()+short()) is int. If that's acceptable then just using common_type directly is the best solution. –  bames53 Sep 25 '12 at 5:13
    
@barnes54: common_type adds a header dependency. there's no need for that. as for getting unsigned int instead short, the OP is asking for a suitable type for a local variable. the most suitable type is the one able to store expression results directly without conversion. that is what this expression produces. and that most suitable type is not what a silly over-engineered templated selector produces. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 25 '12 at 8:00
    
@downvoter: please explain your downvote. i know, the explanation will sound reasonable, just as the triply upvoted comment of barnes53, and i'm probably not even going to comment on it (already discussed). but just for completeness. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 25 '12 at 8:03

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