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I'm having a problem with my insertion on linked list. Here is my code:

    for(j = 0; j < SIZE; j++) {
        body = (textFile*) malloc (sizeof(textFile));
        body->word = words[index[j]];
        if(head == NULL) {
            head = tail = body;
        }
        else {
            tail->next = body;
            tail = body;   
            cout << tail->word << endl;
        }
    }

What hapens here is that the program crashes after it displays the 15th element on my linked list... I don't know why. index is declared as index[20] = {0}; and SIZE is defined as 20, so the linked list is supposed to contain all 20 words inside words array. What can be its possbile cause? Could it be memory allocation? Thanks in advance :)

Heres more of my code. Sorry I'm a little ashamed to post it I'm not good in code elegance. Pardon.

    #include <iostream>
    #include <fstream>
    #include <string>
    #include <ctime>
    #include <cstdlib>
    #define SIZE 20

    using namespace std;

    struct textFile {
        string word;
        struct textFile *next;
    };

    textFile *head, *body, *tail, *temp;

    int main() {
        ifstream wordFile("WORDS.txt", ios::in); // file object constructor
        /* stores words in the file into an array */
        string words[SIZE];
        char pointer;
        int i;
        for(i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
            while(wordFile >> pointer) {
                if(!isalpha(pointer)) {
                    pointer++;
                    break;
                }
                words[i] = words[i] + pointer;
            }
        }
        /* stores the words in the array to a randomized linked list */
        srand(time(NULL));
        int index[SIZE] = {0}; // temporary array of index that will contain         randomized indexes of array words
        int j = 0, ctr;
        // assigns indexes to array index
        while(j < SIZE) {
            i = rand() % SIZE;
            ctr = 0;
            for(int k = 0; k < SIZE; k++) {
                if(!i)
                    break;
                else if(i == index[k]) { // checks if the random number has         previously been stored as index
                    ctr = 1;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(!ctr) {
                index[j] = i; // assigns the random number to the current         index of array index
                j++;
            }
        }
        /* makes sure that there are no double zeros on the array */
        ctr = 0;
        for(i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
            if(!index[i])
                ctr++;
        }
        if(ctr > 1) {
            int temp[ctr-1];
            for(j = 0; j < ctr-1; j++) {
                for(i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
                    if(!index[i]) {
                        int ctr2 = 0;
                        for(int k = 0; k < ctr-1; k++) {
                            if(i == temp[k])
                                ctr2 = 1;
                        }
                        if(!ctr2)
                            temp[j] = i;
                    }
                }
            }
            j = ctr - 1;
            while(j > 0) {
                i = rand() % SIZE;
                ctr = 0;
                for(int k = 0; k < SIZE; k++) {
                    if(!i || i == index[k]) {
                        ctr = 1;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                if(!ctr) {
                    index[temp[j-1]] = i;
                    j--;
                }
            }
        }
        head = tail = body = temp = NULL;
        for(j = 0; j < SIZE; j++) {
            body = (textFile*) malloc (sizeof(textFile));
            body->word = words[index[j]];
            if(head == NULL) {
                head = tail = body;
            }
            else {
                tail->next = body;
                tail = body;
                cout << tail->word << endl;
            }
            }
            temp = head;
        while(temp != NULL) {
            cout << temp->word << endl;
            temp = temp->next;
        }
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
    
What is the output of the application? –  David B Sep 25 '12 at 3:45
    
Does your IDE, platform or debugger provide you with a crash report? –  Dai Sep 25 '12 at 3:45
1  
How is words defined? –  Marc Cohen Sep 25 '12 at 3:52
1  
What is the array index[]? Why do you need that rather than just index the words array directly like words[j] instead of words[index[j]]? Maybe you can post more of your code –  mikeyq6 Sep 25 '12 at 3:57
1  
an unrelated notes: pointer++;break; have no effect. this value never read again. –  J-16 SDiZ Sep 25 '12 at 4:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is with the way you are initializing the body struct:

body = (textFile*) malloc (sizeof(textFile));

The problem here is that the string doesn't get initialized, causing the segmentation fault when you try to assign to it. Use the 'new' keyword instead:

body = new textFile;

Also see here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much Sir! Can I ask a follow-up question? Why is the string not initialized with malloc? I checked out the link you gave, but the terms were too technical for me, like non-trivial constructor and a lot more. I'm really thinking I'd learn more here in stackoverflow than in my class. :)) –  AjiPorter Sep 25 '12 at 11:52
    
What is the difference between 'body = (textFile*) malloc (sizeof(textFile));' and 'body = new textFile'? Sorry about this but it is my first encounter with new; it wasn't discussed yet in our class. :( –  AjiPorter Sep 25 '12 at 13:36
    
I just realized I'm an idiot. body = (textFile*) malloc (sizeof(textFile)); is for C and body = new textFile is for C++. Sorry I just found this by searching on other linked list questions in SO. Thanks again @mikeyq6! :) Here's the link where I got enlightened: stackoverflow.com/questions/9662738/… :D –  AjiPorter Sep 25 '12 at 13:50
    
No worries :) Yeah, malloc is from C, but perfectly acceptable to use in C++ as well if you used a C-style string in your struct, ie. char *word Don't forget to release the memory you assigned to your Nodes as well, at the end of your program by using the delete keyword. –  mikeyq6 Sep 26 '12 at 3:44
    
Yes sire, thank you very much! :) –  AjiPorter Sep 26 '12 at 6:15

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