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We are migrating our C++ source from VS2008 to VS 2010. We are having issues due to incorrect lib files.

Is there any way to determine whether a lib file is build using VS 2010 or VS 2008?

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MSDN's Structure of a Library page mentions a flag for a DUMPBIN tool to extract information from a library, perhaps through this tool you may be able to find a version number or some other distinguishing information. –  Anthony Burleigh Sep 25 '12 at 4:06
    
On the lib's content, different name decorations are used in different compiler versions. –  Mark Garcia Sep 25 '12 at 4:07

1 Answer 1

Strictly speaking, You won't be able to get it from the lib file directly since those are just a container for .obj files (or 'pseudo object files in the case of import libraries). It's possible to have a library that contains object files created by different compilers, though I doubt you'll see that very often, if ever.

However, you may be able to coax the information out of the object files contained in the library.

I don't know how reliable this information is, but it appears that object files produced by MSVC contain version information about the compiler used to build them. The object file contains a section with the name ".debug$S", which will contain debugging information. However, even if you've built the object file without debugging information, there will still be a small ".debug$S" section, which might look like the following for a simple 'hello world' program compiled with VS 2008 SP1 (Compiler Version 15.00.30729.01):

RAW DATA #2
  00000000: 04 00 00 00 F1 00 00 00 56 00 00 00 18 00 01 11  ....ñ...V.......
  00000010: 00 00 00 00 63 3A 5C 74 65 6D 70 5C 68 65 6C 6C  ....c:\temp\hell
  00000020: 6F 2E 6F 62 6A 00 3A 00 3C 11 00 22 00 00 07 00  o.obj.:.<.."....
  00000030: 0F 00 00 00 09 78 01 00 0F 00 00 00 09 78 01 00  .....x.......x..
  00000040: 4D 69 63 72 6F 73 6F 66 74 20 28 52 29 20 4F 70  Microsoft (R) Op
  00000050: 74 69 6D 69 7A 69 6E 67 20 43 6F 6D 70 69 6C 65  timizing Compile
  00000060: 72 00 00 00                                      r...

Note that if you convert the components of the compiler version, 15.00.30729.01, to 16-bit hex numbers, you'll get (displayed in little endian):

0f 00 00 00 09 78 01 00

Which is a string you'll notice shows up twice in the ".debug$S" section at offsets 0x30 and 0x38.

For VS 2010 SP1 (Compiler version 16.00.40219.01) produces the following ".debug$S":

RAW DATA #2
  00000000: 04 00 00 00 F1 00 00 00 56 00 00 00 18 00 01 11  ....ñ...V.......
  00000010: 00 00 00 00 43 3A 5C 74 65 6D 70 5C 68 65 6C 6C  ....C:\temp\hell
  00000020: 6F 2E 6F 62 6A 00 3A 00 3C 11 00 22 00 00 07 00  o.obj.:.<.."....
  00000030: 10 00 00 00 1B 9D 01 00 10 00 00 00 1B 9D 01 00  ................
  00000040: 4D 69 63 72 6F 73 6F 66 74 20 28 52 29 20 4F 70  Microsoft (R) Op
  00000050: 74 69 6D 69 7A 69 6E 67 20 43 6F 6D 70 69 6C 65  timizing Compile
  00000060: 72 00 00 00                                      r...

where you'll note the compiler version data 10 00 00 00 1B 9D 01 00.

Similar signatures are produced by VS 2003 through VS 2012 compilers (VC6 does not produce a ".debug$S" section, and I don't have the means to test VS 2002). However, the offsets of the information differ at times (and may differ even for the same compiler depending on the actual options used and file being compiled).

I'm unaware of a tool that will easily extract this information, but some scripts that string together the lib tool and/or dumpbin could probably be cobbled together pretty easily. Microsoft's "PE and COFF Specification" document may be of some help if you want to pull apart libraries and object files yourself, though the document had no real information about the .debug$S section other than that it exists and contains debugging information.

Note that as far as I know this information is undocumented, and my reverse engineering of it is sketchy to say the least, and may change or not hold for all circumstances. I'm truly uncertain of how reliable this information is, but it's a start if no other better information shows up.

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