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void getS(char *fileName){
    FILE *src;
    if((src = fopen(fileName, "r")) == NULL){
        printf("%s %s %s", "Cannot open file ", fileName, ". The program is now ending.");
        exit(-1);
    }
    //char *get = " ";      

    int c = 1;
    char ch = 'x';
    while(ch!=EOF) {
        ch = fgetc(src);
        if(ch == '\n')  c++;
    }
    fseek(src, 0, SEEK_SET);
    int random = rand() % c;
    int i = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < random; i++){
        while(ch != '\n'){
            ch = fgetc(src);
        }
    }
    do{
        ch = fgetc(src);
        if(ch != '\n' && ch != EOF){
            printf("%c", ch);
        }
    }while(ch != '\n' && ch != EOF);
    printf("%c", '\n');
    fclose(src);
}

So this is my function that grabs a file and prints out a random word in the file if each word is separated by a new line.

Question 1: Why is the random having preference to the first 2 words?

Question 2: How would I make it so I can use this function multiple times without doing the printf("%c", '\n'); because if I don't have that in the end the previous function call just overwrites the old one.

Thanks in advance, I've been asking a bit today thanks for all the help stackoverflow! :)

P.S. using srand(time(NULL));

share|improve this question
    
The % operator always has some bias unless the number of possible random values is exactly divisible, though this probably isn't a significant issue. However, there's a neat trick to avoid needing two passes through your file. When you find the first word, you have a 100% chance of selecting it. When you find the second word, you have a 1-in-2 chance of selecting that instead. When you find the third word, you have a 1-in-3 chance of selecting that instead, and so on. You need to generate lots of random numbers, but that's usually less expensive than two passes through a file. –  Steve314 Sep 25 '12 at 5:24
    
You may need to double-check the probabilities to be comfortable with this, but yes, it really does select any word with equal probability at the end. There was a blog post that mentioned this recently, but I lost the link. –  Steve314 Sep 25 '12 at 5:25
    
You can use putchar(ch) instead of printf("%c", ch) ... it's clearer and faster. –  Jim Balter Sep 25 '12 at 5:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look at the logic here:

    for(i = 0; i < random; i++){
        while(ch != '\n'){
            ch = fgetc(src);
        }
    }

Once you hit a newline, you won't read any more characters, so you're always going to print either the first or second line.

You can fix it like this:

    for(i = 0; i < random; i++){
        ch = fgetc(src); // start by reading the first character on the line
        while(ch != '\n'){
            ch = fgetc(src);
        }
    }

Jim Balter also notes that ch would best be declared as an int. This is because EOF is not considered to be a regular character.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm confused on what a carriage return is exactly. Is it '\r'? How exactly is it caused? –  Man Person Sep 25 '12 at 4:21
    
Oh I think I get it, but how would I not read the carriage return so it doesn't start me back at the start of the file? –  Man Person Sep 25 '12 at 4:23
    
@OstapHnatyuk: I don't know what you mean by "so it doesn't start me back at the start of the file". Only the fseek() is going to cause it to start back at the beginning of the file. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 25 '12 at 4:26
    
Ah okay, I see. Yes, it works! Would you also happen to know how to solve Question 2? I have to print all these words on a new line otherwise they just remove each other. –  Man Person Sep 25 '12 at 4:27
    
Yes, I understand how '\r' interacts now. Sorry about that misconception. –  Man Person Sep 25 '12 at 4:28

without printf("%c","\n"); line at the end it is working fine...

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