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Is the first element of arr1 getting added? cout is giving me an error. What am I doing wrong?

#include <iostream>
using std::cin; using std::cout; using std::endl;

#include <string>
using std::string;

#include <vector>
using std::vector;

#include <cstddef>
using std::size_t;

int main ()
{
    vector <int> ivec1; //defines a vector named ivec1 to hold values not yet defined
    int arr1 [5] = {10, 20, 30 , 40, 50}; // defines array named arr1 with 5 values
    ivec1.push_back (arr1 [0]);
    cout << ivec1 << endl;

    return 0;
}
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Greetings and welcome to StackOverflow! Please post your actual question in the body of the question, not only in the subject. If your program is giving any errors, it would help if you would update the question with the actual error message. –  Burhan Khalid Sep 25 '12 at 4:16

2 Answers 2

The answer is quite simple: The operation you are invoking is simply not defined. The IO stream library is blissfully unaware of C++ standard library containers (besides std::string) and does not know how to print them. You will need to do that yourself.

std::vector<int> v;
for(auto& x : v)
  std::cout << v << " "; // print each element
std::cout << std::endl; // and a linebreak
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I guess cout is not able to work with vectors. I'd implement something like this (I'm sorry for my C++ I didn't write in C++ since 2006...

#include "stdafx.h"

#include <iostream>
using std::cin; using std::cout; using std::endl;

#include <string>
using std::string;

#include <vector>
using std::vector;

#include <cstddef>
using std::size_t;

void fillVector(int output[], vector<int>& input, int size)
{
    for(int i=0;i<size; i++)
    {
        input.push_back(output[i]);
    }
}

void printVector(vector<int>& input)
{
    for(int i=0; i<input.size(); i++)
    {
        cout << input.at(i);
        if(i!=input.size()-1)
        {
            cout << ",";
        }
    }
    cout << endl;
}


int main ()
{
    vector <int> ivec1; //defines a vector named ivec1 to hold values not yet defined
    int arr1 [5] = {10, 20, 30 , 40, 50}; // defines array named arr1 with 5 values
    int sz = sizeof(arr1) / sizeof(int);

    fillVector(arr1, ivec1, sz);

    printVector(ivec1);

    return 0;
}
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You seriously should take a look at the standard library that comes with C++. –  pmr Oct 21 '12 at 20:23
    
Shame on me :). 5 years without STL were a critical for my mind. Thank you for the elegant solution you've provided! –  Mikhail Payson Oct 22 '12 at 8:23

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