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I have came across a strange query performance issue that I am struggling to understand.

The following is a simplified version of the model structure I have, hopefully it will be enough to illustrate the issue:

class Note(models.Model):
   ...
   name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
   parentNote = models.ForeignKey('self', null=True)
   form = models.ForeignKey('NoteForm', null=True)
   ...

class Event(Note):
   ...
   startDate = models.DateField()
   ...

class Activity(Event):
   ...

The Activity model is the source of the issue I am facing. It has an extensive inheritance heirarchy, none of which is abstract. I do not know if this contributes to the issue. Activity has ~280000 records and, obviously, its parents have at least that many, if not more.

The NoteForm model is not described above - it is only necessary to know that it is external to the Activity model's hierarchy and contains less than 100 records.

I am using Django version 1.3.

The problem occurs when querying for the latest "child" Activity of some parent Activity. The query filters by the parentNote field, orders by the 'startDate' field (descending) and uses Python's index notation to select the first result (which, by my understanding, simply adds LIMIT 1 to the generated SQL). See below for the code.

This query runs unexpectedly slowly when no results are found - 10+ seconds. If results are found, it runs as expected - well under 1 second.

Further investigation revealed the following:

  • It is the limit causing the issue. Just doing the filter, without limiting to the first result, is not slow - whether results are found or not.
  • Ordering is partially a culprit. Removing the ordering removes the issue.
  • The parentNote filter is partially a culprit. Changing the filter to use the form or name field removes the issue.

In code:

# Original - SLOW
try:
    latest = Activity.objects.filter(
        parentNote=activity.pk
    ).order_by('-startDate')[0]
except IndexError:
    latest = None

# FAST

# No limit
Activity.objects.filter(
    parentNote=activity.pk
).order_by('-startDate')

# No ordering
try:
    latest = Activity.objects.filter(
        parentNote=activity.pk
    )[0]
except IndexError:
    latest = None

# Different filter
try:
    latest = Activity.objects.filter(
        form=activity.pk
    ).order_by('-startDate')[0]
except IndexError:
    latest = None

# Different filter
try:
    latest = Activity.objects.filter(
        name=activity.pk
    ).order_by('-startDate')[0]
except IndexError:
    latest = None

If the issue is at the database level, I can't see it. I've run the "Original" and "No Limit" examples from above in the django-debug-toolbar's debugsqlshell. The "Original" took 16 seconds and "No Limit" took 59ms. I copied both queries printed by the debugsqlshell and ran them in pgAdmin. "Original" took 1375ms and "No Limit" took 94ms. So it is slower, but not by the amount I'm seeing using the ORM. EXPLAIN ANALYZE definitely shows the query analyzer taking different paths, which I completely understand. But I cannot reproduce the 16 second query using SQL directly.

So, in summary:

  • I am seeing LIMIT queries running far slower than identical queries without the LIMIT, but only when no results are found.
  • Queries that return results do not run slowly - and they are identical apart from the values of the filters.
  • It appears to be a function of which fields are included in the filters, and whether or not the queryset is ordered.
  • It does NOT appear to be a database level issue as running the SQL directly does not run slowly.

Update:

While trying suggestions made in the comments, the above examples suddenly ceased suffering from this issue - before I found any evidence as to the cause, let alone implemented a fix. I still have no idea what the problem was, but now I do not have a means to reproduce it in order to further investigate.

share|improve this question
1  
I think you are going to have to post more information before people can really help you. Database design/structure matters. Indexes matter. I would start by posting what version of Django you are using. And what version of the PostgreSQL. You should do an "explain" on the query that is getting generated and see where you are paying such a high price. Also, if this is really your code, then the reason some of your queries execute so fast is that querysets are lazy and you aren't actually retrieving data (notice you don't do an assignment for the "fast one" or iter over results) – David S Sep 25 '12 at 5:06
    
@DavidS I have updated my question to reflect Django version and refined what I am asking. The code I posted was more for illustrative purposes than being exactly what I was running for my tests. E.g. it has none of my timing code. I am well aware of the laziness of querysets and made sure to evaluate all querysets when timing their execution. See my refined question for the reasons for exclusion of database-level details. – oogles Sep 25 '12 at 5:39
    
A good starting point is to set log_min_duration_statement = 0 in postgresql.conf, so that you can see exactly what queries are spawned by Django and how long they take. Find the one that takes 10+ seconds. Run the same statement in psql with EXPLAIN ANALYZE. I bet it will take 10+ seconds there as well. – sayap Sep 25 '12 at 9:23
    
I agree with @sayap. I doubt Django is doing anything that would cause a LIMIT to take this long. I've never seen it in my code. The problem is almost definitely at the database level. My guess is that you don't have an index on startDate and it is having to do a full table scan. EXPLAIN ANALYZE is the best way to figure that out. One final suggestion: I highly recommend using django-debug-toolbar and enabling the SQL panel. I have found many problems where Django was issuing more sql stmts than I realized. It will show you all of the stmts for a given request. – David S Sep 25 '12 at 15:07
    
Well, if it's at the database level, I can't see it. I've run the "Original" and "No Limit" examples from above in the django-debug-toolbar's debugsqlshell. The "Original" took 16 seconds and "No Limit" took 59ms. I copied both queries printed by the debugsqlshell and ran them in pgAdmin. "Original" took 94ms and "No Limit" took 1375ms. EXPLAIN ANALYZE definitely shows the query analyzer taking different paths, which I completely understand. But I cannot reproduce the 16 second query using SQL directly. – oogles Sep 25 '12 at 23:24

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