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I have a lab assignment in my Python Programming class that I am having a little trouble with. Our instructor gave us source code GeometricObject.py as a reference.

class GeometricObject(object):
  def __init__(self, color = "white", filled = True):
    self.color = color
    self.filled = filled

  def getColor(self):
    return self.color

  def setColor(self, color):
    self.color = color

  def isFilled(self):
    return self.filled

  def setFilled(self, filled):
    self.filled = filled

  def __str__(self):
    return "color: " + self.color + \
        " and filled: " + str(self.filled)

Now I'm supposed to use this class, to create a subclass that applies this information to different objects. I have to make a class to calculate the area and perimeter among other things of a circle, as well as a triangle.

I am having trouble understanding when I need to copy and paste from the source code or if I don't need to. Here is the first class I made, that deals with a Circle. Simple question: Is it named correctly? Should the class be called GeometricObject(circle):???

import math

class GeometricObject(object):
  '''Class using a Circle'''
  def __init__(self, color = "white", filled = True):
    self.radius = 1
    self.color = color
    self.filled = filled

  def getColor(self):
    return self.Color

  def setColor(self, color):
    self.color = color

  def isFilled(self):
    return self.filled

  def setFilled(self, filled):
    self.filled = filled

  def getArea(self):
    self.area = math.pi(self.radius)**2
    return self.area

  def getPerimeter(self):
    r = radius
    self.perimeter = 2(math.pi)(r)
    return self.perimeter

  def __str__(self):
    return "color: " + self.color + \
        " and filled: " + str(self.filled)

Note: In the def_str_ method, It is supposed to print Circle: radius = 3 color: red and filled: True" even though it previously states to set the default values as 1, and the color: white. I am confused by this.

That's pretty much the jist of it. I'm hoping my coding is correct so far!

I then have to do the same thing for the Triangle class, but I'm pretty sure it's similiar.

class GeometricObject(object):
  '''Class using a Triangle'''
  def __init__(self, color = "white", filled = True):
    self.side1 = 1
    self.side2 = 1
    self.side3 = 1

  def getArea(self):
    s = (self.side1 + self.side2 + self.side3)/2
    area = math.sqrt(s(s - self.side1)(s - self.side2)(s - self.side3))
    return area

  def getPerimeter(self)
    perimeter = self.side1 +self.side2 + self.side3
    return perimeter

  def __str__(self):
    return "color: " + self.color + \
        " and filled: " + str(self.filled)

  def getColor(self):
    return self.Color

  def setColor(self, color):
    self.color = color

  def isFilled(self):
    return self.filled

  def setFilled(self, filled):
    self.filled = filled

So I guess my main questions are: +Am I supposed to copypaste the source code from GeometricObject() over and over, or is it already there? +The string method is confusing to me because it is asking for different values than previously specified. +The code. I think I implemented the area and perimeter formulas for each correctly?

Thanks in advance. Any help is greatly appreciated!!

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Looks like your teacher didn't do a very good job of explaining subclassing. –  Joel Cornett Sep 25 '12 at 5:06

3 Answers 3

I think you want to do it like this:

class Circle(GeometricObject):
  .
  .
  .

class Triangle(GeometricObject):
  .
  .
  .

You only need to implement those things in the Circle and Triangle classes that are different from the GeometricObject class.

share|improve this answer
    
I see. That makes sense now that I think about it. I ran the program and there where no syntax errors or anything. Do you think I would run into any problems when I write a program to test all of it?? –  xrocker15 Sep 25 '12 at 5:09
    
@xrocker15: mistakes are common -- that is what testing is for! –  Vaughn Cato Sep 25 '12 at 5:10

Vaughn's got the right idea on subclassing Geometric Objects, but check your work on the getArea function:

s(s - self.side1)

will raise the following traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'int' object is not callable
share|improve this answer
    
what does this error mean exactly? why wouldn't this code execute correctly?? –  xrocker15 Sep 25 '12 at 5:25
    
@xrocker15: What do you expect this line of code to do? –  Joel Cornett Sep 25 '12 at 5:34
    
This line? area = math.sqrt(s(s - self.side1)(s - self.side2)(s - self.side3)) It computes the area...right? –  xrocker15 Sep 25 '12 at 5:39

In order to use the GeometricObject.py file you're going to want to import the file so that you can access it's methods, make sure that both files are in the same directory:

import GeometricObject from GeometricObject

Put that at the top of your current file if you wish to keep it separate. You can also simply copy-paste the source code from that file as well if you wish. Next, you're going to want to create the class of GeometricObject. In Python, it is implied that any class that does not have a specified inheritance has object as it's superclass. The cleanest way to write out this problem would be simply:

class GeometricObject:

instead of

class GeometricObject(object):

All following classes that wish to inherit the methods in the GeometricObject class would be written like this. You must include

super().__init__() 

in your initializer for your subclass in order to initialize all the data fields in the GeometricObject superclass so that you can use them. That way you can delete the isFilled and getColor and setColor methods out of your Triangle class and keep them in your GeometricObject class.

class Triangle(GeometricObject):
    def __init__(self, color = "white", filled = True):
        super().__init__()
    -
    -
    -
class Circle(GeometricObject):
    -
    -
    -

Also, keep an eye out for

area = math.sqrt(s(s - self.side1)(s - self.side2)(s - self.side3))

This will return an error. In Python (x)(x) does not mean x * x. This instead will need to be written out like:

area = math.sqrt(s*(s - self.side1)*(s - self.side2)*(s - self.side3))
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