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I have a service, say:

factory('aService', ['$rootScope', '$resource', function ($rootScope, $resource) {
  var service = {
    foo: []
  };

  return service;
}]);

And I would like to use foo to control a list that is rendered in HTML:

<div ng-controller="FooCtrl">
  <div ng-repeat="item in foo">{{ item }}</div>
</div>

In order for the controller to detect when aService.foo is updated I have cobbled together this pattern where I add aService to the controller's $scope and then use $scope.$watch():

function FooCtrl($scope, aService) {                                                                                                                              
  $scope.aService = aService;
  $scope.foo = aService.foo;

  $scope.$watch('aService.foo', function (newVal, oldVal, scope) {
    if(newVal) { 
      scope.foo = newVal;
    }
  });
}

This feels long-handed, and I've been repeating it in every controller that uses the service's variables. Is there a better way to accomplish watching shared variables?

share|improve this question
    
You can pass a third parameter to $watch set to true to deep watch aService and all its properties. –  SirTophamHatt Oct 8 '13 at 14:09
    
$scope.foo= aService.foo is sufficient, you can lose the line above. And what it does inside $watch does not make sense, if you want to assign a new value to $scope.foo just do it... –  Jin Feb 27 at 6:37
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8 Answers

You can always use the good old observer pattern if you want to avoid the tyranny and overhead of $watch.

In the service:

factory('aService', function() {
  var observerCallbacks = [];

  //register an observer
  this.registerObserverCallback = function(callback){
    observerCallbacks.push(callback);
  };

  //call this when you know 'foo' has been changed
  var notifyObservers = function(){
    angular.forEach(observerCallbacks, function(callback){
      callback();
    });
  };

  //example of when you may want to notify observers
  this.foo = someNgResource.query().$then(function(){
    notifyObservers();
  });
});

And in the controller:

function FooCtrl($scope, aService){
  var updateFoo = function(){
    $scope.foo = aService.foo;
  };

  aService.registerObserverCallback(updateFoo);
  //service now in control of updating foo
};
share|improve this answer
1  
I really like this approach. –  guiomie Aug 22 '13 at 13:16
5  
@Moo listen for the $destory event on the scope and add an unregister method to aService –  Jamie Sep 1 '13 at 18:17
5  
What are pros of this solution? It needs more code in a service, and somewhat the same amount of code in a controller (since we also need to unregister on $destroy). I could say for execution speed, but in most cases it just won't matter. –  Alex Che Feb 12 at 14:58
3  
not sure how this is a better solution than $watch, the questioner was asking for a simple way of sharing the data, it looks even more cumbersome. I would rather use $broadcast than this –  Jin Feb 27 at 6:32
1  
$watch vs observer pattern is simply choosing whether to poll or to push, and is basically a matter of performance, so use it when performance matters. I use observer pattern when otherwise I would have to "deep" watch complex objects. I attach whole services to the $scope instead of watching single service values. I avoid angular's $watch like the devil, there is enough of that happening in directives and in native angular data-binding. –  dtheodor Feb 27 at 12:19
show 2 more comments

As far as I can tell, you dont have to do something as elaborate as that. You have already assigned foo from the service to your scope and since foo is an array ( and in turn an object it is assigned by reference! ). So, all that you need to do is something like this :

function FooCtrl($scope, aService) {                                                                                                                              
  $scope.foo = aService.foo;

 }

If some, other variable in this same Ctrl is dependant on foo changing then yes, you would need a watch to observe foo and make changes to that variable. But as long as it is a simple reference watching is unnecessary. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. If the variable in the service is a "primitive" instead of an object, like a string, would that, in turn, require a $watch? –  berto Sep 25 '12 at 8:30
20  
I tried, and I couldn't get $watch to work with a primitive. Instead, I defined a method on the service that would return the primitive value: somePrimitive() = function() { return somePrimitive } And I assigned a $scope property to that method: $scope.somePrimitive = aService.somePrimitive;. Then I used the scope method in the HTML: <span>{{somePrimitive()}}</span> –  Mark Rajcok Oct 2 '12 at 20:24
    
Thanks for the suggestion Mark. It works great. –  Bruce Banner Jul 9 '13 at 7:33
1  
@MarkRajcok No don't use primitives. Add them in a object. Primitives are not mutables and so 2way data binding will not work –  Jimmy Kane Sep 2 '13 at 9:28
1  
@JimmyKane, yes, primitives should not be used for 2-way databinding, but I think the question was about watching service variables, not setting up 2-way binding. If you only need to watch a service property/variable, an object is not required -- a primitive can be used. –  Mark Rajcok Sep 3 '13 at 14:31
show 1 more comment

Here's how I implement a service in my controllers.

function PageController($scope, PageStateService) {
    // initial value
    $scope.page = 0;
    // watch current page for updates and set page value
    $scope.$watch(PageStateService.getCurrentPage, function(newValue, oldValue, scope) {
        if (newValue && newValue !== oldValue) {
            $scope.page = newVal;
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This is exactly how the OP said he didn't want to do it. –  Xesued Feb 4 '13 at 21:40
8  
The digest cycle allows for 200 operations a second. Until that limit is reached, I suggest not doing premature optimization. –  rxgx Feb 6 '13 at 18:30
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In a scenario like this, where multiple/unkown objects might be interested in changes, use $rootScope.$broadcast from the item being changed.

Rather than creating your own registry of listeners (which have to be cleaned up on various $destroys), you should be able to $broadcast from the service in question.

You must still code the $on handlers in each listener but the pattern is decoupled from multiple calls to $digest and thus avoids the risk of long-running watchers.

This way, also, listeners can come and go from the DOM and/or different child scopes without the service changing its behavior.

** update: examples **

Broadcasts would make the most sense in "global" services that could impact countless other things in your app. A good example is a User service where there are a number of events that could take place such as login, logout, update, idle, etc. I believe this is where broadcasts make the most sense because any scope can listen for an event, without even injecting the service, and it doesn't need to evaluate any expressions or cache results to inspect for changes. It just fires and forgets (so make sure it's a fire-and-forget notification, not something that requires action)

.factory('UserService', [ '$rootScope', function($rootScope) {
   var service = <whatever you do for the object>

   service.save = function(data) {
     .. validate data and update model ..
     // notify listeners and provide the data that changed [optional]
     $rootScope.$broadcast('user:updated',data);
   }

   // alternatively, create a callback function and $broadcast from there if making an ajax call

   return service;
}]);

The service above would broadcast a message to every scope when the save() function completed and the data was valid. Alternatively, if it's a $resource or an ajax submission, move the broadcast call into the callback so it fires when the server has responded. Broadcasts suit that pattern particularly well because every listener just waits for the event without the need to inspect the scope on every single $digest. The listener would look like:

.controller('UserCtrl', [ 'UserService', '$scope', function(UserService, $scope) {

  var user = UserService.getUser();

  // if you don't want to expose the actual object in your scope you could expose just the values, or derive a value for your purposes
   $scope.name = user.firstname + ' ' +user.lastname;

   $scope.$on('user:updated', function(event,data) {
     // you could inspect the data to see if what you care about changed, or just update your own scope
     $scope.name = user.firstname + ' ' + user.lastname;
   });

   // different event names let you group your code and logic by what happened
   $scope.$on('user:logout', function(event,data) {
     .. do something differently entirely ..
   });

 }]);

One of the benefits of this is the elimination of multiple watches. If you were combining fields or deriving values like the example above, you'd have to watch both the firstname and lastname properties. Watching the getUser() function would only work if the user object was replaced on updates, it would not fire if the user object merely had its properties updated. In which case you'd have to do a deep watch and that is more intensive.

$broadcast sends the message from the scope it's called on down into any child scopes. So calling it from $rootScope will fire on every scope. If you were to $broadcast from your controller's scope, for example, it would fire only in the scopes that inherit from your controller scope. $emit goes the opposite direction and behaves similarly to a DOM event in that it bubbles up the scope chain.

Keep in mind that there are scenarios where $broadcast makes a lot of sense, and there are scenarios where $watch is a better option - especially if in an isolate scope with a very specific watch expression.

share|improve this answer
    
Getting out of the $digest cycle is a Good Thing, especially if the changes you're watching aren't a value that will directly and immediately go into the DOM. –  XMLilley Jan 28 at 0:23
    
@Matt I'm a beginner in Angular, it'll be great if you can explain your approach with some examples/code. –  coding_idiot Feb 5 at 17:59
    
@coding_idiot I updated the answer with some code examples if that helps. –  Matt Pileggi Feb 6 at 20:12
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Building on dtheodor's answer you could use something similar to the below to ensure that you don't forget to unregister the callback... Some may object to passing the $scope to a service though.

factory('aService', function() {
  var observerCallbacks = [];

  /**
   * Registers a function that will be called when
   * any modifications are made.
   *
   * For convenience the callback is called immediately after registering
   * which can be prevented with `preventImmediate` param.
   *
   * Will also automatically unregister the callback upon scope destory.
   */
  this.registerObserver = function($scope, cb, preventImmediate){
    observerCallbacks.push(cb);

    if (preventImmediate !== true) {
      cb();
    }

    $scope.$on('$destroy', function () {
      observerCallbacks.remove(cb);
    });
  };

  function notifyObservers() {
    observerCallbacks.forEach(function (cb) {
      cb();
    });
  };

  this.foo = someNgResource.query().$then(function(){
    notifyObservers();
  });
});

Array.remove is an extension method which looks like this:

/**
 * Removes the given item the current array.
 *
 * @param  {Object}  item   The item to remove.
 * @return {Boolean}        True if the item is removed.
 */
Array.prototype.remove = function (item /*, thisp */) {
    var idx = this.indexOf(item);

    if (idx > -1) {
        this.splice(idx, 1);

        return true;
    }
    return false;
};
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Here's my generic approach.

mainApp.service('aService',[function(){
        var self = this;
        var callbacks = {};

        this.foo = '';

        this.watch = function(variable, callback) {
            if (typeof(self[variable]) !== 'undefined') {
                if (!callbacks[variable]) {
                    callbacks[variable] = [];
                }
                callbacks[variable].push(callback);
            }
        }

        this.notifyWatchersOn = function(variable) {
            if (!self[variable]) return;
            if (!callbacks[variable]) return;

            angular.forEach(callbacks[variable], function(callback, key){
                callback(self[variable]);
            });
        }

        this.changeFoo = function(newValue) {
            self.foo = newValue;
            self.notifyWatchersOn('foo');
        }

    }]);

In Your Controller

function FooCtrl($scope, aService) {
    $scope.foo;

    $scope._initWatchers = function() {
        aService.watch('foo', $scope._onFooChange);
    }

    $scope._onFooChange = function(newValue) {
        $scope.foo = newValue;
    }

    $scope._initWatchers();

}

FooCtrl.$inject = ['$scope', 'aService'];
share|improve this answer
    
I like your approach –  Daniel Gruszczyk Feb 7 at 11:00
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I'm using similar approach as @dtheodot but using angular promise instead of passing callbacks

app.service('myService', function($q) {
    var self = this,
        defer = $q.defer();

    this.foo = 0;

    this.observeFoo = function() {
        return defer.promise;
    }

    this.setFoo = function(foo) {
        self.foo = foo;
        defer.notify(self.foo);
    }
})

Then wherever just use myService.setFoo(foo) method to update foo on service. In your controller you can use it as:

myService.observeFoo().then(null, null, function(foo){
    $scope.foo = foo;
})

First two arguments of then are success and error callbacks, third one is notify callback.

reference for $q http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/service/$q

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A wee bit ugly, but I've added registration of scope variables to my service for a toggle:

myApp.service('myService', function() {
var self = this;
self.value = false;
self.c2 = function(){};
self.callback = function(){
    self.value = !self.value; 
    self.c2();
};
self.on = function(){return self.value;};
self.register = function(obj, key){ 
    self.c2 = function(){
        obj[key] = self.value; 
        obj.$apply();
    } 
};
return this;});

And then in the controller:

function MyCtrl($scope, myService) {
$scope.name = 'Superhero';
$scope.myVar = false;
myService.register($scope, 'myVar');}
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