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I have multithreaded application as I ask here. I want to terminate the thread, and start a new one when following method is called.

procedure TFRABData.RefreshDataset;
var
  GridUpdater: TGridUpdater;
begin
  if Assigned(updaterThread) and (updaterThread <> nil) then
  begin
    updaterThread.Terminate;
  end;
  GridUpdater := TGridUpdater.Create(True);
  GridUpdater.OwnerForm := Self;
  updaterThread := GridUpdater;
  GridUpdater.FreeOnTerminate := False;
  GridUpdater.Start;
  CodeSite.Send('RefreshDataset executed');
end

but, when FreeOnTerminate set to True, I get Access Violation, but when FreeOnTerminate set to False, I get memory leak. How to free the thread?

share|improve this question
    
So you want to have one and only one this type of worker thread running at one time ? In other words, when the RefreshDataset method is called, you want to terminate the currently running thread - interrupt its currently performed operation and let's say (re)start it ? If so, then I would keep one, still running (just pending) thread. –  TLama Sep 25 '12 at 6:30
    
But, when RefreshDataset is called, it means something changed, and it need to re-run the thread from beginning even when current worker thread is not finish yet. –  Niyoko Yuliawan Sep 25 '12 at 6:32
    
Looking at what's inside (from your previous question), it will be better to create more than one thread. You have there some stored procedure loading and that is probably time consuming and it might take some time before you'd be able to restart the thread (you'd have to wait until the current operation finishes). No, that's not a good idea, taking back... –  TLama Sep 25 '12 at 6:36
1  
You must never hold a reference to an executing thread for which you have set FreeOnTerminate –  David Heffernan Sep 25 '12 at 9:24
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

And in addition to RRUZ's answer, to let it work with FreeOnTerminate = False:

Terminate just sets the flag, it does nothing more.

Change

  if Assigned(updaterThread) and (updaterThread <> nil) then 
  begin 
    updaterThread.Terminate; 
  end; 

to

  if Assigned(updaterThread) then 
  begin 
    updaterThread.Free; 
  end; 

Free will call Terminate and WaitFor subsequently to eliminate your memory leak.

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It's working by combine @RRuz and @ngln's answer. Avoid to create suspended thread and calling free, not terminate –  Niyoko Yuliawan Sep 25 '12 at 6:36
    
I just realize, to terminate current thread, it must wait the stored proc to finish executing, and it still take some time and make UI freeze. –  Niyoko Yuliawan Sep 25 '12 at 7:09
    
Yes, that's true. You could ask a new question on how to prevent thát. –  NGLN Sep 25 '12 at 9:36
1  
-1 NEVER call Free() on a thread that has not been signaled to terminate yet. DO NOT rely on the thread destructor calling Terminate() and WaitFor() for you. ALWAYS call them explicitally in your own code instead. Plenty of people have run into problems over the years by freeing a running thread and letting the destructor do the termination. It just does not work correctly, and is not the right place to handle this anyway. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 25 '12 at 17:54
1  
It has been proven time and time and time again that the TThread destructor CANNOT be relied on to properly terminate the thread if it is still running. What David and you are suggesting is dangerous. DO NOT rely on it. Explicitally terminate a thread yourself, THEN free it. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 25 '12 at 21:45
show 2 more comments
  1. avoid the need of start a suspended thread
  2. modify your TThread constructor to receive the OwnerForm parameter
  3. set the FreeOnTerminate value in the constructor of your thread.
  4. Start the TThread in a not suspended state.

something like so.

  TGridUpdater = class(TThread)
  private
    FOwnerForm: TForm;
  public
    constructor Create(OwnerForm : TForm); overload;
    destructor Destroy; override;
    procedure Execute; override;
  end;

constructor TGridUpdater.Create(OwnerForm: TForm);
begin
  inherited Create(False);
  FreeOnTerminate := True;
  FOwnerForm:=OwnerForm;
end;

destructor TGridUpdater.Destroy;
begin

  inherited;
end;

procedure TGridUpdater.Execute;
begin
  //your code goes here

end;

Now you can create your Tthread on this way

GridUpdater:=TGridUpdater.Create(Self); //Just set it and forget it
share|improve this answer
    
It's working, but, when RefreshDataset is called again when thread is not finished executing yet, it still throw Access violation –  Niyoko Yuliawan Sep 25 '12 at 6:27
    
Try the @NGLN recommendations. –  RRUZ Sep 25 '12 at 6:28
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You need to call Terminate(), WaitFor() and Free() all together, eg:

procedure TFRABData.RefreshDataset; 
var 
  GridUpdater: TGridUpdater; 
begin 
  if Assigned(updaterThread) then 
  begin 
    updaterThread.Terminate; 
    updaterThread.WaitFor; 
    FreeAndNil(updaterThread); 
  end; 
  GridUpdater := TGridUpdater.Create(True); 
  GridUpdater.OwnerForm := Self; 
  GridUpdater.Start; 
  updaterThread := GridUpdater; 
  CodeSite.Send('RefreshDataset executed'); 
end;
share|improve this answer
    
In this case, when OP wants to have a grid updated as soon as possible I wouldn't wait for the thread to terminate. I would prefer to use FreeOnTerminate and just terminate the thread and create another one. Surely, you'd have to be very careful, when synchronizing the UI thread, since there's a big race condition risk from the ghost threads and the updates can't be frequent due to ghost thread count. Both might be solved by organizing all threads to a collection with a certain limit of ghosts count. With the model, that OP currently has might be probably easier to (re)use just one thread. –  TLama Sep 25 '12 at 18:40
2  
The thread is using a database connection and posting UI updates. If you just signal the existing thread to terminate without actually waiting for it, the new thread might trample on that. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 25 '12 at 19:44
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