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I use Apache Maven to manage my Java libs (jar) and some of projects that use the libs. For convinience, I use mvn eclipse:eclipse to generate Eclipse project files which can be imported into Eclipse workspace for editing.

Problems arise when I edit the main project and Java lib projects in the same Eclipse workspace. That is, mvn eclipse:eclipse includes src path dependency in .classpath file, not the jar dependency as expected.

Say I have a Jave lib project named mylib. The corresponding jar file mylib.jar has been deployed to a private Maven repo maintained by me. In order to use mylib.jar in the main project, the following dependency is included in pom.xml.

<!-- pom.xml for the main project -->
<dependency>
  <groupId>namespace.my</groupId>
  <artifactId>mylib</artifactId>
  <version>[1.0, )</version>
</dependency>

mvn compile and mvn test work perfect, in which mylib.jar is automatically downloaded from my repo. However, when trying mvn eclipse:eclipse, I find the generated .classpath file doesn't include mylib.jar dependency as expected. Instead, it includes source file directory for mylib as follows.

<!-- .classpath file generated by mvn eclipse:eclipse -->
<classpathentry kind="src" path="/mylib"/>

It seems that Maven reads Eclipse's metadata and finds mylib and the main project coexits in the same workspace. Therefore maven includes the source for my good. Damn. How can I tell maven to ignore the local project source and just include the jar file?

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use the m2e Eclipse plugin instead? –  Nicola Musatti Sep 25 '12 at 8:20
    
Because I feel comfortable to type commands in console -- compilation, test, packaging are all done in one command. Besides, useful configuration segments in pom.xml can be easily reused in other projects. Eclipse is good, but too many menus plus numerous plugins look complicated for me. –  Jianwen W. Sep 25 '12 at 9:05
    
The two aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, even though you'd have to give up on the Maven Eclipse plugin in order to use m2e. I find Eclipse convenient for debugging and m2e guarantees that the build process is as similar as possible inside and outside Eclipse. –  Nicola Musatti Sep 25 '12 at 9:07
    
They are mutually exclusive - you can't use both together. m2e is really great (as is m2e-wtp), but can be a real pain when you have plugins configured that it can't handle and it pollutes your pom with "lifecycle mappings". The maven eclipse plugin is quick and simple but gets the job done. –  Hound Dog Sep 25 '12 at 9:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I believe this is actually because they're related projects in Eclipse. So if you right-click on your main project and go to Project References your lib project should be ticked.

If you run mvn eclipse:eclipse it will automatically add project references for any sub-projects (modules). You can change this with the useProjectReferences property of the maven eclipse plugin.

It defaults to true, but

When set to false, the plugin will not create sub-projects and instead reference those sub-projects using the installed package in the local repository

To use the property either set the property in your pom.xml

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-eclipse-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.9</version>
            <configuration>
                <useProjectReferences>false</useProjectReferences>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
    <plugins>
<build>

Or as a property on the command line:

mvn eclipse:eclipse -Declipse.useProjectReferences=false
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Eclipse needs to know the path to the local maven repository. Therefore the classpath variable M2_REPO has to be set. Execute the following command:

mvn -Declipse.workspace=<path-to-eclipse-workspace> eclipse:add-maven-repo

You can also define a new classpath variable inside eclipse: From the menu bar, select Window > Preferences. Select the Java > Build Path > Classpath Variables page.

Then build the project by executing mvn eclipse:eclipse

Hope that helps !

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Thanks for Hound Dog's hints. Yes, useProjectReferences controls Maven how to handle sub projects -- including source dir or including jar files.

I haven't installed the maven plugin for Eclipse, so I add the following configuration in pom.xml. It tells Maven to include jar dependency in local maven repo, not the source dir. If the required jar file is not present in local repo, it will be automatically downloaded on the fly.

  <!-- pom.xml for the main project: include jar, not src path -->
  <plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-eclipse-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.9</version>
    <configuration>
            <useProjectReferences>false</useProjectReferences>
    </configuration>
  </plugin>

Now mvn eclipse:eclipse works as expected.

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I've updated my answer to reflect this, as well as the command line alternative. If you're happy with that, don't forget to select it as the correct answer :) –  Hound Dog Sep 25 '12 at 9:26

Just try using the type element inside dependency tag and mention source/jar as the type in your pom.xml

<!-- pom.xml for the main project --> 
<dependency>
   <groupId>namespace.my</groupId>
   <artifactId>mylib</artifactId>
   <version>[1.0, )</version>
   <type>jar<type> <!-- source/jar -->
 </dependency> 
share|improve this answer
    
It is not working. –  Marcin Apr 17 '13 at 14:49

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