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I have read the various posts to do with inheritance and that Protocol Buffers does not support inheritance. I don't want inheritance in the Protocol Buffers messages but rather inheritance so I can deal with all my Protocol Buffers messages easily.

I am using protobuf-net 2.0.0.480 and a .proto file to define my protocol. It all works well except when I get to the point where I would like a common ancestor so that I can do some common functionality and allow for easy inspection. A simple example:

My .proto file:

message ProtocolInformation {
  enum MessageKinds {
    LAYOUT_ADVANCE = 1;
    LAYOUT_RENDER = 2;                             
  }
  required MessageKinds MessageKind = 1;  
  required int32 UniqueID = 2;            
} 

message GFX_Layout_Advance {
  required ProtocolInformation ProtocolInfo = 1;
  required int32 LayoutHandle = 2;
}

message GFX_Layout_Render {
  required ProtocolInformation ProtocolInfo = 1;
  required int32 LayoutHandle = 2;
  required int32 Stage = 3;
}  

which ultimately generates classes for GFX_Layout_Advance, GFX_Layout_Render as (only a portion of GFX_Layout_Advance) shown:

[global::System.Serializable, global::ProtoBuf.ProtoContract(Name = @"GFX_Layout_Advance")]
public partial class GFX_Layout_Advance : global::ProtoBuf.IExtensible
{
    public GFX_Layout_Advance() { }

    private GFX_Protocol.ProtocolInformation _ProtocolInfo;
    [global::ProtoBuf.ProtoMember(1, IsRequired = true, Name = @"ProtocolInfo", DataFormat = global::ProtoBuf.DataFormat.Default)]
    public GFX_Protocol.ProtocolInformation ProtocolInfo 

As it was a partial class and there appeared to be no overrideable constructor I implemented:

public partial class GFX_Layout_Advance : GfxProtocolMessageBase
    {
        public override ProtocolInformation ProtocolInformation()
        {
            return ProtocolInfo;
        }
    } 

This would allow me to treat all incoming messages as GfxProtocolMessageBase and allow querying of ProtocolInformation so that I can cast to the appropriate descendant. In this case GFX_Layout_Advance. However.....

  • Adding the additional partial class GFX_Layout_Advance() causes a different protobuf encoding. As the only change to the interface is a method I don't understand why this is?

Bottom line is:

  1. I want to introduce a common base ancestor to all the generated protobuf-net classes
  2. Base ancestor class will allow me access to information about what kind of message I am dealing with as I don't want to have to cast to the actual message type until I am ready

How do I achieve 1. & 2.?

All pointers appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. Yes that should work fine as long as GfxProtocolMessageBase is not a contract type. It uses partial classes deliberately to allow this type of thing. The encoded data should not change. If you have a scenario that misbehaves that I can look at I will happily investigate.

  2. That's fine; just: don't use Serializer.Serialize<GfxProtocolMessageBase> / Serializer.Deserialize<GfxProtocolMessageBase>, as the serializer should not know about GfxProtocolMessageBase (unless of course you're happy to, but that does mean you won't be following the existing .proto 100%). For serialization, either Serializer.NonGeneric.Serialize or typeModel.Serialize (for example, RuntimeTypeModel.Default.Serialize) will do the right thing automatically. For deserialization, you will need to know the actual target Type.

Of course, the alternative option is to allow GfxProtocolMessageBase to be known to the serializer as a base-type, and use protobuf-net's inbuilt inheritance support ([ProtoInclude(...)] etc) - but the problem then is: that won't map 100% to your .proto, as inheritance is implemented (by protobuf-net) as encapsulation, meaning: it will be written as though it is a base-message with a number of optional sub-message fields.


Edit to show type-resolver usage for reading different objects (of heterogeneous types) from a single stream:

using ProtoBuf;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
[ProtoContract]
class Foo
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "Foo with Id=" + Id;
    }
}
[ProtoContract]
class Bar
{
    [ProtoMember(2)]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "Bar with Name=" + Name;
    }
}
static class Program
{
    // mechanism to obtain a Type from a numeric key
    static readonly Dictionary<int, Type> typeMap = new Dictionary<int, Type>
    {
        {1,typeof(Foo)}, {2,typeof(Bar)}
    };
    static Type ResolveType(int key)
    {
        Type type;
        typeMap.TryGetValue(key, out type);
        return type;
    }
    static void Main()
    {
        // using MemoryStream purely for convenience
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            // serialize some random data (here I'm coding the outbound key
            // directly, but this could be automated)
            Serializer.SerializeWithLengthPrefix(ms, new Foo { Id = 123 },
                PrefixStyle.Base128, 1);
            Serializer.SerializeWithLengthPrefix(ms, new Bar { Name = "abc" },
                PrefixStyle.Base128, 2);
            Serializer.SerializeWithLengthPrefix(ms, new Foo { Id = 456 },
                PrefixStyle.Base128, 1);
            Serializer.SerializeWithLengthPrefix(ms, new Bar { Name = "def" },
                PrefixStyle.Base128, 2);

            // rewind (this wouldn't be necessary for a NetworkStream,
            // FileStream, etc)
            ms.Position = 0;

            // walk forwards through the top-level data
            object obj;
            while (Serializer.NonGeneric.TryDeserializeWithLengthPrefix(
                ms, PrefixStyle.Base128, ResolveType, out obj))
            {
                // note we overrode the ToString on each object to make
                // this bit work
                Console.WriteLine(obj);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
1. Thanks. I had some other bug that caused the unexpected serialization I was seeing. Not a protobuf-net issue. Serialization is being consumed by a Delphi deserializer successfully. 2. Still need to deserialize from the Delphi serialized content but don't expect that to be an issue. With the above I have been able to fillow the .proto 100% which is what I wanted. –  TheEdge Sep 26 '12 at 22:33
    
For deserialization you will need to know the target type.... Unfortunately I don't know what that will be as there are many messages all coming in on the same input stream. How do I get protobuf-net to automagically create one based on the bytes retrieved? –  TheEdge Sep 27 '12 at 7:19
    
@TheEdge there is no inbuilt way for the protocol buffers specification to handle that. However, the trick here is to write this data with SerializeWithLengthPrefix(output, obj, PrefixStyle.Base128, fieldNumber), where fieldNumber is per-type - i.e. Foo might be 1, Bar might be 2, etc. Then use NonGeneric.TryDeserializeWithLengthPrefix(input, PrefixStyle.Base128, typeResolver, out obj), where typeResolver returns Foo for 1, Bar for 2, etc. I can do a full example if you want. –  Marc Gravell Sep 27 '12 at 11:23
    
@Mark If you have some simple example code I would appreciate it. How I handled this Delphi side is that given a valid protocol buffers byte stream my base class on that end is able to decode the message ProtocolInformation {} and then from that MessageKind tells me what type I need for decoding. Is there any way I could do a similair kind of thing C# side? So use protobuf-net to do the necessary "peek" of the byte stream to get the actual type I need? –  TheEdge Sep 27 '12 at 23:55
    
@TheEdge added example in .NET terms via TryDeserializeWithLengthPrefix. Re doing the same as your Delphi implementation: can you be more specific? protobuf-net doesn't have a "peek" feature on the raw reader API, but: there is a raw reader API, so it might be reasonable to use the raw reader for the outer portions, and ProtoReader.ReadObject for the internals. I would have to see exactly what your data looks like to say for sure, and I might need to expose the keys - but fundamentally all the pieces are there. –  Marc Gravell Sep 28 '12 at 5:53

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