Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it proper to use the break function to exit several nested for loops? If so, how would you go about doing this? Can you also control how many loops the break exits?

share|improve this question
add comment

12 Answers

up vote 75 down vote accepted

AFAIK, C++ doesn't support naming loops, like Java and other languages do. You can use a goto, or create a flag value that you use. At the end of each loop check the flag value. If it is set to true, then you can break out of that iteration.

share|improve this answer
100  
Don't be afraid to use a goto if that is the best option. –  Hooked Aug 10 '09 at 23:50
6  
I'm a new C++ programmer (and one without any formal programming training) thus after reading about people's rants on goto. I'm hesitant on using it in fear my program might just suddenly explode and kill me. Other than that, when i used to write programs on my ti-83 (in boring math class of course), the functions the basic editor provided required the use of goto's. –  Faken Aug 11 '09 at 2:18
9  
@Faken: Two types of programmers use goto: Bad programmers, and pragmatic programmers. The former are self explanatory. The latter, which you would fit into if you choose to use them well, use a so called "evil" concept when it is the lesser of (two) evils. Read this for a better understanding of some C++ concepts that you might need to use from time to time (macros, goto's, preprocessor, arrays): parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/big-picture.html#faq-6.15 –  Hooked Aug 11 '09 at 4:26
12  
@Faken: There's nothing wrong with using goto. It's misusing a goto that is troublesome. –  Everyone Aug 11 '09 at 4:51
7  
@Hooked: That's right, except that using goto rarely ever is the best option. Why not put the loops into their own function (inline, if you're concerned about speed) and return from this? –  sbi Aug 11 '09 at 9:08
show 5 more comments

No, don't spoil it with a break. This is the last remaining stronghold for the use of goto.

share|improve this answer
8  
Moderated +1, Funny. –  greyfade Aug 11 '09 at 0:45
3  
The MISRA C++ coding standard allows the use of goto to cover this exact kind of situation. –  Richard Corden Aug 11 '09 at 8:13
add comment

Another approach to breaking out of a nested loop is to factor out both loops into a separate function, and return from that function when you want to exit.

Of course, this brings up the other argument of whether you should ever explicitly return from a function anywhere other than at the end.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's a C problem. With RIAA early return is not a problem as all the problems associated with early return are correctly handled. –  Loki Astari Aug 11 '09 at 0:12
2  
I understand that proper application of RIAA can solve the resource cleanup problem in C++, but I have seen the philosophical argument against early return continue in other environments and languages. One system I worked on where the coding standard prohibited early return had functions littered with boolean variables (with names like continue_processing) that controlled the execution of blocks of code further down in the function. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 11 '09 at 0:23
6  
What is RIAA? Is that anything like RAII? =D –  Hooked Aug 11 '09 at 0:39
14  
RIAA is a Resource Initialized by Antagonistic legal Actions. It's sort of like telling the free store to surrender memory to you because it has wronged you. –  greyfade Aug 11 '09 at 0:41
1  
er yes, s/RIAA/RAII/g; :) –  Greg Hewgill Aug 11 '09 at 0:58
show 1 more comment

break will exit only the innermost loop containing it.

You can use goto to break out of any number of loops.

Of course goto is often Considered Harmful.

is it proper to use the break function[...]?

Using break and goto can make it more difficult to reason about the correctness of a program. See here for a discussion on this: Why Dijkstra suggested Premature-Loop-Exit Prohibition.

share|improve this answer
7  
A good answer in that it explains that "goto is harmful" meme is strongly tied to the more generalized "control flow interruption is harmful" statement. It is meaningless to say "goto is harmful", and then turn around and recommend using break or return. –  Pavel Minaev Aug 11 '09 at 0:46
1  
@Pavel: break and return have the advantage over goto that you don't need to hunt for a label in order to find where they go. Yes, underneath they are some kind of goto, but a very restricted one. They are a lot easier to decipher by a programmer's pattern-matching brain than the unrestricted goto. So IMO they are preferable. –  sbi Aug 11 '09 at 9:13
    
@sbi: True, but break is still not part of structured programming. It is just better tolerated than a goto. –  Hooked Aug 11 '09 at 15:53
1  
@KarlVoigtland the Dijkstra link is outdated; this appears to be working: blog.plover.com/2009/07 –  Aaron Brager Feb 21 '13 at 21:59
    
There is absolutely nothing wrong with using goto in this situation. A well placed goto is leaps and bounds better and more readable than many of the contorted solutions otherwise proposed. –  James Sep 19 '13 at 13:07
add comment

Although this answear was already presented, i think a good approach is to do the following:

for(unsigned int z = 0; z < z_max; z++)
{
    bool gotoMainLoop = false;
    for(unsigned int y = 0; y < y_max && !gotoMainLoop; y++)
    {
        for(unsigned int x = 0; x < x_max && !gotoMainLoop; x++)
        {
                          //do your stuff
                          if(condition)
                            gotoMainLoop = true;
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
which is good but still not so readable, i'd prefer goto in that case –  Петър Петров Aug 28 '13 at 17:03
add comment

How about this?

for(unsigned int i=0; i < 50; i++)
{
    for(unsigned int j=0; j < 50; j++)
    {
        for(unsigned int k=0; k < 50; k++)
        {
            //Some statement
            if (condition)
            {
                j=50;
                k=50;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
interesting approach but I definitely like the way ered @inf.ig.sh handles it. for (unsigned int y = 0; y < y_max && !gotoMainLoop; y++). –  Andrew Anthony Gerst Jun 21 '12 at 20:06
    
Of course goto here :) –  Петър Петров Aug 28 '13 at 17:02
add comment

You can use try...catch.

try {
    for(int i=0; i<10; ++i) {
        for(int j=0; j<10; ++j) {
            if(i*j == 42)
                throw 0; // this is something like "break 2"
        }
    }
}
catch(int e) {} // just do nothing
// just continue with other code

If you have to break out of several loops at once, it is often an exception anyways.

share|improve this answer
add comment

One nice way to break out of several nested loops is to refactor your code into a function:

void foo()
{
    for(unsigned int i=0; i < 50; i++)
    {
        for(unsigned int j=0; j < 50; j++)
        {
            for(unsigned int k=0; k < 50; k++)
            {
                // If condition is true
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
...which is not a option if we have to pass 10-20 variables for stack framing this function. –  Петър Петров Aug 28 '13 at 17:04
1  
@ПетърПетров then go for a lambda which is also better as you can define it exactly where you need it. –  DarioP Nov 7 '13 at 13:28
    
+1 for lambdas but overhaul in game engine core where even one stack frame is still a bottleneck. Sorry to tell, but lambdas are not so lightweight at least in MSVC 2010. –  Петър Петров Apr 9 at 13:12
add comment

The break statement terminates the execution of the nearest enclosing do, for, switch, or while statement in which it appears. Control passes to the statement that follows the terminated statement.

from msdn.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Other languages such as PHP accept a parameter for break (i.e. break 2;) to specify the amount of nested loop levels you want to break out of, C++ however doesn't. You will have to work it out by using a boolean that you set to false prior to the loop, set to true in the loop if you want to break, plus a conditional break after the nested loop, checking if the boolean was set to true and break if yes.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Breaking out of a for-loop is a little strange to me, since the semantics of a for-loop typically indicate that it will execute a specified number of times. However, it's not bad in all cases; if you're searching for something in a collection and want to break after you find it, it's useful. Breaking out of nested loops, however, isn't possible in C++; it is in other languages through the use of a labeled break. You can use a label and a goto, but that might give you heartburn at night..? Seems like the best option though.

share|improve this answer
5  
It's not strange at all. If you're iterating over a collection to look for something (and don't have a faster way of searching), there's no point finishing the loop. (as one example) –  Joe Aug 11 '09 at 0:44
add comment

I use matlab .. this code works using multi "break"

m=0;
for i=1:3
    for k=1:4
        j=i+1
        if j==3
            m=1;
            break;
        end
        if m==1
            break;
        end
    end
        if m==1
            break;
        end
end
share|improve this answer
4  
the question is about C++. This isn't valid C++ code so it's not helpful –  Kate Gregory Jan 26 '13 at 17:07
3  
Not c++. Also, the logic is curious: The first if m==1 statement inside the k loop will never get hit, because when m is set, you break. Also the indentation of the code is not great. Not sure it was worth waiting three years for this answer. –  Rob Jan 26 '13 at 17:07
add comment

protected by Henk Holterman Jun 12 '13 at 11:12

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.