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I am trying to merge two hashes. Well, I am able to merge but the output is not the way i wanted to be :

Here is by code :

my %firend_list = (
   Raj       => "Good friend",
   Rohit     => "new Fiend",
   Sumit     => "Best Friend",
   Rohini    => "Fiend",
   Allahabad => "UttarPradesh",
);

my %city = (
    Bangalore => "Karnataka",
    Indore    => "MadhyaPradesh",
    Pune      => "Maharashtra",
    Allahabad => "UP",
);

my %friends_place = ();
my ($k, $v);
foreach my $ref (\%firend_list, \%city) {

    while (($k,$v) = each (%$ref)) {

        if (exists $ref{$k}) {

            print"Warning: Key is all ready there\n";
            next;
        } 
        $friends_place{$k} = $v;
    }  
}

while (($k,$v) = each (%friends_place)) {

    print "$k = $v \n";
}  

From this o/p is

Raj=Good friend
Indore=MadhyaPradesh
Rohit=new Fiend
Bangalore=Karnataka
Allahabad=UttarPradesh
Sumit=Best Friend
Pune=Maharashtra
Rohini =Fiend

But I want to print %firend_list first followed by %city. Another thing which I was trying to do is if is there any duplicate key then it should give me a warning message. But it is not giving me any message as we can see here we have Allahabad in both hash.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Do you just need all keys from the first hash before all keys from the second? Or do the keys of these hashes also need to be sorted in some way? Either way you need to use an array to keep the order, as a hash does not keep any (insertion or alphabetic) by itself. –  Thilo Sep 25 '12 at 7:39
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The line if (exists $ref{$k}) { is wrong and you can see it if you're putting use strict; use warnings; at the begining of the script.

Moreover this line should be if (exists $friends_place{$k}) { to produce the message about duplicate keys.

share|improve this answer
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Try with:

my %firend_list = (
   Raj       => "Good friend",
   Rohit     => "new Fiend",
   Sumit     => "Best Friend",
   Rohini    => "Fiend",
   Allahabad => "UttarPradesh",
);

my %city = (
    Bangalore => "Karnataka",
    Indore    => "MadhyaPradesh",
    Pune      => "Maharashtra",
    Allahabad => "UP",
);
#merging
my %friends_place = ( %friend_list, %city );

And, for warnings:

foreach my $friend( keys %friend_list ){
 print"Warning: Key is all ready there\n" if $friend ~~ [ keys %city ];

}
share|improve this answer
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As hashes are unordered, you need to use an array to store the ordering:

my %friends_place = (%firend_list, %city);
my @friends_place_keyorder = ((keys %firend_list), (keys %city));
if ((scalar keys %friends_place) != (scalar @friends_place_keyorder)) {
    print 'duplicate key found';
}
foreach (@friends_place_keyorder) {
    print "$_ = $friends_place{$_}\n";
}

EDIT: my original solution in python, left here for historical purpose:

As hashes are unordered, you need to use an array to store the ordering. I don't know perl, so the following code is python (should be fairly straightforward to translate to perl):

friend_list = ...
city = ...
friends_place = dict(friend_list.items() + city.items())
friends_place_keyorder = friend_list.keys() + city.keys()

# detect duplicate keys by checking their lengths
# if there is duplicate then the hash would be smaller than the list
if len(friends_place) != len(friends_place_keyorder): 
    print "duplicate key found"

# iterate through the list of keys instead of the hashes directly
for k in friends_place_keyorder:
    print k, friends_place[k]
share|improve this answer
    
this is python if I'm not mistaken, right? –  Tudor Constantin Sep 25 '12 at 9:13
1  
@TudorConstantin: that is correct, as noted in my answer, I don't know enough about perl to make specifics. But the approach should be the same in both languages. As noted in your answer, I believe in perl you'd use the comma operator instead of the plus operator to merge the dicts and construct the key lists; and len() is done by prepending $ to the array name. –  Lie Ryan Sep 25 '12 at 9:27
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