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I need a way to find the sign bit in a 32 bit integer (the most significant bit) using only the operators ! ~ & ^ | +. I am only allowed to use constants up to 0xFF, but larger numbers can be constructed. And it must be inline code, no loops or conditionals

Yes this is for an assignment however this is not the whole problem it is only a minor case I need to check.

I know I can get the sign by doing x>>31, which can be done using division, but that only leads to the need to have more bit shifts which i can't use :(

The fewer the operators the better too, because I am only allowed 10 to do the whole problem and this is only a minor case.

The problem this is for is to check if a number x is equal to 0x7FFFFFFF. the way my code reads now is [(is x neg?) & (is x+1 negative)]. if x equals 0x7FFFFFFF then adding 1 will overflow the buffer causing x to become negative. but this logic will only work if x is not negative before hand. hence the first part.

help me please???

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closed as too localized by paxdiablo, ecatmur, Monolo, skolima, Mark Sep 26 '12 at 10:13

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You haven't specified a language, and operator symbols (such as ! ~ & ^ | +) may mean different things in different languages (okay, + probably doesn't), so may be worth being explicit about what operations are allowed. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 25 '12 at 8:07
    
The language is C –  Andrew M Sep 25 '12 at 8:54
    
Things like language should go in the Tags, not the Title. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 25 '12 at 9:04
2  
What about #include <limits.h> and negative = INT_MIN & number ? 1 : 0 –  Jens Sep 25 '12 at 9:31
    
using the ? is a conditional and isn't allowed :( –  Andrew M Sep 25 '12 at 10:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Testing the sign bit is difficult; for the whole problem I think you're looking for something along the lines of

!((~x) ^ (x + 1))

This tests that ~x and x + 1 are bitwise identical i.e. are the same number.

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I think he covered why he was asking this question in the question itself? To clarify: He will overflow on the (x+1) part –  im so confused Sep 25 '12 at 14:46
    
@AK4749 right, that's why it works. What's your point? –  ecatmur Sep 25 '12 at 16:17
    
apparently that i have 0 comprehension skills! neat trick! –  im so confused Sep 25 '12 at 16:18
    
it fails for -1, but it's better logic than what I had. –  Andrew M Sep 25 '12 at 21:21
    
@ecatmur I've tried several things to check for the case -1 but I'm lost. any Hints or help? –  Andrew M Sep 25 '12 at 21:41

Are you allowed to use unions? This is in keeping with your other parameters. Be careful to check the endianness of the processor. That determines whether the array index should be 0 or 3.

typedef union
    {
    int integer;
    unsigned char byte[4];
    } IntSplitter;

IntSplitter a;
a.integer = ValueToBeTested + 1;
// now the value (a.byte[3]&0x80) returns 1 for neg or 0 for pos
// for example
if(a.byte[3]&0x80)
    // code if negative..

EDIT: I already stated that the endianness determines whether the index should be 0 or 3. If I am mistaken, the other way to do this is still extremely simple... Actually much easier than my previous example.

#ifdef BIG_ENDIAN
typedef union
    {
    int integer;
    struct
        {
        unsigned IsNegative :1
        unsigned :7
        unsigned :8
        unsigned :8
        };
    }CheckNeg_t
#else
typedef union
    {
    int integer;
    struct
        {
        unsigned :8
        unsigned :8
        unsigned :7
        unsigned IsNegative :1
        };
    }CheckNeg_t
#endif

CheckNeg_t a;
a.integer = ValueToBeTested + 1;

if(a.IsNegative)
    // code if negative..
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Only works on little-endian systems. –  twalberg Sep 25 '12 at 14:57
    
This doesn't work on big-endian machines. –  Jens Sep 25 '12 at 14:59
    
@Jens I think my edit is a more elegant solution and it takes care of endianness. –  Jeremy Sep 25 '12 at 16:12
    
@Jeremy Well, it's certainly not portable since you need even more unions: it is implementation defined whether the bits in a single bit-field are MSBit first or LSBit first according to C99#6.7.2.1#10. This quickly loses elegance... –  Jens Sep 25 '12 at 20:55
    
You used conditionals a.k.a an if statement –  Andrew M Sep 25 '12 at 21:28
#include <limits.h>

negative = !!(INT_MIN & number);
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what is the reason for using !!? –  jev Jul 29 at 14:51
1  
@jev Makes the result 0 or 1 instead of 0 or nonzero. –  Jens Jul 29 at 18:21

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