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I like to send a generic type converter function to a method but I can't figure out how to do it.

Here's invalid syntax that explains what I like to achieve, the problem is I don't know how to specify the generic type together with my func:

public void SomeUtility(Func<T><object,T> converter)
{
    var myType = converter<MyType>("foo");
}

Edit (see also my discussion in the comments with Lawrence) : By "generic type converter" I meant I would like to pass in a converter that can convert to any strong type <T> (not object), so the next line in my method could be:

var myOtherType = converter<MyOtherType>("foo");

The delegate I like to pass as a parameter would look something like this:

private delegate TOutput myConverterDelegate<TOutput>(object objectToConvert);

This is more a syntax / C# exploration now, to get things done I will probably use an interface instead, but I do hope this is possible to accomplish with a func/delegate.

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Is the fact you've specified a type inside the method body significant? Are you implying this method may need to make conversions against multiple types, rather than one specific type defined by the caller? –  Lawrence Wagerfield Sep 25 '12 at 8:39
    
Yes, that was what I tried to express as a "generic type converter" so the next line could be var myOtherType = converter<MyOtherType>("foo"); –  joeriks Sep 25 '12 at 8:43
    
Ok - then I think you'll find my answer useful :) –  Lawrence Wagerfield Sep 25 '12 at 8:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You cannot have instances of generic functions or actions - all type parameters are defined upfront and cannot be redefined by the caller.

An easy way would be to avoid polymorphism altogether by relying on down-casting:

public void SomeUtility(Func<Type, object, object> converter)
{
    var myType = (MyType)converter(typeof(MyType), "foo");
}

If you want type safety, you need to defer the definition of the type parameters to the caller. You can do this by composing a generic method within an interface:

public void SomeUtility(IConverter converter)
{
    var myType = converter.Convert<MyType>("foo");
}

interface IConverter
{
   T Convert<T>(object obj);
}

Edit:

If the 'converter type' is known at the call-site, and only this type will be used inside the utility method, then you can define a generic type on the method and use that, just like other posters have suggested.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok thanks, yes I will probably just use an interface, thanks for pointing me to that direction. But, out of interest, shouldn't a delegate / a func be able to pass on a generic type? Described as a delegate I guess I would write it as : private delegate TOutput myConverterDelegate<TOutput>(object objectToConvert); - but when I try to use that as a parameter I get "requires 1 type arguments" –  joeriks Sep 25 '12 at 9:09
1  
You can certainly define generic delegates, after all, that's exactly what Func and Action are. They are treated as generic definitions, just like generic interfaces and classes are. However, you cannot use generic definitions in method signatures, only parameterized generic types. Quite simply you cannot do what you are trying to achieve with a delegate alone. –  Lawrence Wagerfield Sep 25 '12 at 9:34
public void SomeUtility<T>(Func<object, T> converter)
{
    var myType = converter("foo");
}

and then:

SomeUtility(arg => new MyType());

The generic type inference will work in this case.

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You need to make SomeUtility generic as well. Doing this and fixing the syntax gives:

public void SomeUtility<T>(Func<object,T> converter)
{
    var myType = converter("foo");
}
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You have to know the T type at compile-time to use it. The T can either be specified at class-level or at method-level.

class SomeClass<T> {
    public void SomeUtility(Func<object, T> converter) {
        var myType = converter("foo"); // Already is the T-type that you specified.
    }
}

or

public void SomeUtility<T>(Func<object, T> converter) {
    var myType = converter("foo"); // Already is the T-type that you specified.
}
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