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If I have a base class like this I couldn't change:

public abstract class A {
    public abstract Object get(int i);
}

and I try to extend it with a Class B like this:

public class B extends A{
    @Override
    public String get(int i){
        //impl
        return "SomeString";
    }
}

everything is ok. But my attempt to make it use more generic fails if I try:

public class C extends A{
    @Override
    public <T extends Object> T get(int i){
        //impl
        return (T)someObj;
    }
}

I can't think of any reason, why this should be dissallowed. In my understanding the generic type T is bound to an Object - which is the requested return type of A. If I can put String or AnyObject as return type inside B, why I'm not allowed to put <T extends Object> T inside my C class?

Another Strange behavior in my point of View is that an additional Method like this:

public class D extends A{

    @Override
    public Object get(int i){
        //impl
    }

    public <T extends Object> T get(int i){
        //impl
    }
}

Is also not allowed with the hint of a DuplicateMethod. This one, at least confuses me, and I think java should make a decision: Is it the SAME return Type, why not allow overriding, and if it is not, I should be able to add this Method. To tell me its the same, but I cannot take it to Override is very weired in common sense

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For your first case, what error/warning to you get? –  wulfgar.pro Sep 25 '12 at 9:03
    
@wulfgar.pro The method get(int) of type C must override or implement a supertype method –  Rafael T Sep 25 '12 at 9:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

JLS # 8.4.2. Method Signature

The signature of a method m1 is a subsignature of the signature of a method m2 if either:

  • m2 has the same signature as m1, or

  • the signature of m1 is the same as the erasure (§4.6) of the signature of m2.

As per above rule as your parent do not have an erasure and your child has one so it is not a valid overriding.

JLS#8.4.8.3. Requirements in Overriding and Hiding

Example 8.4.8.3-4. Erasure Affects Overriding

A class cannot have two member methods with the same name and type erasure:

class C<T> {
    T id (T x) {...}
}
class D extends C<String> {
    Object id(Object x) {...}
}

This is illegal since D.id(Object) is a member of D, C.id(String) is declared in a supertype of D, and:

  • The two methods have the same name, id
  • C.id(String) is accessible to D
  • The signature of D.id(Object) is not a subsignature of that of C.id(String)
  • The two methods have the same erasure

Two different methods of a class may not override methods with the same erasure:

 class C<T> {
     T id(T x) {...}
 }
 interface I<T> {
     T id(T x);
 }
 class D extends C<String> implements I<Integer> {
    public String  id(String x)  {...}
    public Integer id(Integer x) {...}
 }

This is also illegal, since D.id(String) is a member of D, D.id(Integer) is declared in D, and:

  • The two methods have the same name, id
  • D.id(Integer) is accessible to D
  • The two methods have different signatures (and neither is a subsignature of the other)
  • D.id(String) overrides C.id(String) and D.id(Integer) overrides I.id(Integer) yet the two overridden methods have the same erasure

Also It gives example of a case where it is allowed from super to child

The notion of subsignature is designed to express a relationship between two methods whose signatures are not identical, but in which one may override the other. Specifically, it allows a method whose signature does not use generic types to override any generified version of that method. This is important so that library designers may freely generify methods independently of clients that define subclasses or subinterfaces of the library.

Consider the example:

class CollectionConverter {
List toList(Collection c) {...}
}
class Overrider extends CollectionConverter {
 List toList(Collection c) {...}

}

Now, assume this code was written before the introduction of generics, and now the author of class CollectionConverter decides to generify the code, thus:

 class CollectionConverter {
   <T> List<T> toList(Collection<T> c) {...}
 }

Without special dispensation, Overrider.toList would no longer override CollectionConverter.toList. Instead, the code would be illegal. This would significantly inhibit the use of generics, since library writers would hesitate to migrate existing code.

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I understand tgat this may be a problem. However I see it as a Problem if the BASE class is going to change. Here I want the Superclass to change the return type. If in the Future A changes to String get(int i) any othe child of it gets broken, too –  Rafael T Sep 25 '12 at 8:57
    
@LukasEder Added That specific case. –  Amit Deshpande Sep 25 '12 at 9:01
1  
Sorry, but I still can't get it. In your examples a GENERIC method gets overriden by a concrete Type. In my case, I want Object to get Overriden by a Generic Type, which is bound to - of course - Object. Generally, if a return Type of Object is requested, i should be able to override it with ANY Type which is NOT a Raw Type. –  Rafael T Sep 25 '12 at 9:14
    
Because your parent class does not have erasure and your child class has one. As stated in the sub-signature rule above it is not a valid overriding. –  Amit Deshpande Sep 25 '12 at 9:47

Well, for the first part, the answer would be that Java does not allow non-generic methods to be overridden by generic methods, even if the erasure is the same. It means that it wouldn't work even if you would just have the overriding method as:

 public <T extends Object> Object get(int i)

I don't know why Java poses this limitation (gave it some thought), I just think it has to do with special cases implemented for sub-classing generic types.

Your second definition would essentially translate to:

public class D extends A{

    @Override
    public Object get(int i){
    //impl
    }

    public Object get(int i){
        //impl
    }

}

which is obviously a problem.

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Imagine the following invocation.

A a = new C();
a.get(0);

In effect you are calling a generic method, yet you're not passing in any type arguments. As things stand, this is not much of a problem. Those type arguments disappear during code generation anyways. Yet reification has never been taken off the table and the stewards of Java the language have tried and continue to try and keep that door open. If type arguments were reified, your invocation would not provide any to a method that requires one.

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From the JLS section 8.4.8.3 Overriding and hiding:

It is a compile-time error if a type declaration T has a member method m1 and there exists a method m2 declared in T or a supertype of T such that all of the following conditions hold:

  1. m1 and m2 have the same name.

  2. m2 is accessible from T.

  3. The signature of m1 is not a subsignature (§8.4.2) of the signature of m2.

  4. The signature of m1 or some method m1 overrides (directly or indirectly) has the same erasure as the signature of m2 or some method m2 overrides (directly or indirectly).

1 and 2 holds.

3 holds too because (quote from JLS section 8.4.2):

The notion of subsignature is designed to express a relationship between two methods whose signatures are not identical, but in which one may override the other. Specifically, it allows a method whose signature does not use generic types to override any generified version of that method.

And you are having the other way: a method with generic type overriding one without generic.

4 holds too because the erased signatures are the same: public Object get(int i)

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You should read up on erasure.

In your example:

public class D extends A{

  @Override
  public Object get(int i){
      //impl
  }

  public <T extends Object> T get(int i){
      //impl
  }
}

The compiler generated byte code for your generic method will be identical to your non-generic method; that is, T will be replaced with the upper bound, that being Object. That's why you're getting the DuplicateMethod warning in your IDE.

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I understand that it is the same Type. Thats why I'm wondering I'm not allowed to just Override it WITH THE SAME TYPE –  Rafael T Sep 25 '12 at 9:11

Declaring method as <T extends Object> T get(int i) makes no sense without declaring T somewhere else - in the method's arguments or in a field of the enclosing class. In the latter case, just parameterize the whole class with the type T.

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1  
It makes sense if you want to "unsafely" conveniently auto-cast objects to any T. As the compiler can infer types in assignments: String s = get(0); instead of String s = (String) get(0); –  Lukas Eder Sep 25 '12 at 10:07

There's a conceptual problem. Suppose C#get() overrides A#get()

A a = new C();
Object obj = a.get();  // actually calling C#get()

but C#get() requires a T - what should T be? There is no way to determine.

You can protest that T is not required due to erasure. That is correct today. However erasure was considered a "temporary" workaround. The type system in most part does not assume erasure; it is actually carefully designed so that it can be made fully "reifiable", i.e. without erasure, in future version of java without breaking existing code.

share|improve this answer
    
as mentioned in the answer above from Alexei and the comment below from @LukasEder: T should be the leftHand assignment argument to autocast Objects. In your case it just is bound to Object –  Rafael T Sep 26 '12 at 13:45
    
heads will explode if we combine inference rules with override rules. –  irreputable Sep 26 '12 at 15:13

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