Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following 2 methods that i thing could be compressed in one method using generics. What i have tried can not compile. Can someone let me know how this can be done? I need to check that 2 differents field of the table AgeLengths have at least one values. Str_table has one to many relationship with AgeLengths.

public static bool HasMeanWeight(int id)
{
    MyDataContext dc = new MyDataContext ();
    return  (from s in dc.Str_table 
             where s.SId == id 
             select s.AgeLengths
             .Where(a => a.MeanWeight != null ).Any() == true
            ).FirstOrDefault();
}

public static bool HasNumbersData(int id)
{
    MyDataContext dc = new MyDataContext ();
    return (from s in dc.Str_table 
            where s.sId == id 
            select s.AgeLengths
            .Where(a => a.Numbers  != null).Any() == true
           ).FirstOrDefault();
}

Thanks in advance B

share|improve this question
2  
What types are a.Numbers and a.MeanWeight? You could possibly supply a Func<T> to return those as a method parameter. –  Adam Houldsworth Sep 25 '12 at 8:54
    
a.Numbers is integer and a.MeanWeight is decimal –  Meelfan Bmfp Sep 25 '12 at 8:59
1  
I'm not trying to be facetious, but your check for null will not work if the types are value types, which means you can ignore that check entirely in the code. –  Adam Houldsworth Sep 25 '12 at 9:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Update: Apologies, I didn't realise this was linq to sql. Dennis's answer appears to be on the mark.

Try injecting a Func<T, TResult> to inject the differing code:

public static bool HasData(int id, Func<AgeLength, object> selector)
{
    MyDataContext dc = new MyDataContext ();
    return (from s in dc.Str_table 
            where s.sId == id 
            select s.AgeLengths
                .Where(a => selector(a) != null)
                .Any())
           .FirstOrDefault();
}

And call like so:

HasData(1, a => a.Numbers);
HasData(1, a => a.MeanWeight);

If the Numbers and MeanWeight properties are in the same inheritance hierarchy, then you can substitute object with something more useful, but in this instance object is fine as you are just testing for null.

share|improve this answer
1  
the code above throws the following exception: Method 'System.Object DynamicInvoke(System.Object[])' has no supported translation to SQL. –  Meelfan Bmfp Sep 25 '12 at 9:05
    
The types are more precisely int? decimal? –  Meelfan Bmfp Sep 25 '12 at 9:07
    
@MeelfanBmfp: this is because you can't pass a predicate itself. See my answer below. –  Dennis Sep 25 '12 at 9:14
    
As @Dennis pointed out, you need an Expression, not just a Func since it seems to be DataContext related. –  Joachim Isaksson Sep 25 '12 at 9:19

If you're using some DataContext, you're using IQueryable<T>, and you're very limited with stuff you can write in your expressions. So, you need to pass an expression to your method, not a predicate itself:

static bool HasData(int id, Expression<Func<AgeLength, bool>> predicate)
{
    using (MyDataContext dc = new MyDataContext())
    {
        return (from s in dc.Str_table
                where s.sId == id
                select s.AgeLengths
                .Any(predicate)
               ).FirstOrDefault();
    }
}

Besides:

  • there's Any overload, that accepts predicate expression;
  • context must be disposed (see using);
  • there's no need to write someBoolExpression == true; just write someBoolExpression.

Than you can call this method like this:

HasData(1, a => a.MeanWeight != null);
HasData(1, a => a => a.Numbers  != null);

Note, that the second argument is a lambda expression, not a method.
This is because of lazy nature of queries: you're providing a set of expressions, and the corresponding provider converts them into appropriate SQL.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks interesting, could you provide an example of how i could call this method? Expressions are still an esoteric subject to me... –  Meelfan Bmfp Sep 25 '12 at 9:15
    
@MeelfanBmfp: updated and fixed a typo. –  Dennis Sep 25 '12 at 9:20
    
while testing this from linqpad , i get the following erros: Argument 2: cannot convert from 'System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<System.Func<LINQPad.User.AgeLength,T>>' to 'System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<System.Func<LINQPad.User.AgeLength,bool>>' any idea? –  Meelfan Bmfp Sep 25 '12 at 9:26
    
this was done by calling the method as follow HasData(4349,a=>a.Numbers!=null ); 4349 is a valid id from my table –  Meelfan Bmfp Sep 25 '12 at 9:28
    
@MeelfanBmfp: I've updated the code after your first comment. There's no need to use Expression<System.Func<AgeLength, T>>, Expression<System.Func<AgeLength, bool>> will be enough. Hence, there's no need for HasData method to be a generic method. –  Dennis Sep 25 '12 at 9:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.