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I am implementing a recursive registry delete using RegOpenKeyEx, RegDeleteKey and RegEnumKey.

Problem:: Though the code works perfectly fine for Vista x86/x64 and Win 7 x86/x64 but fails on XP for some keys in HKCR

Problem Area:: HKCR\Installer\Products\SomeKey

Error Code:: 87 (INVALID_PARAMETER)

Weird Behaviour:: Deletes the key the moment I open the key using REGEDIT.

Code::

static BOOL RcrsvRegDel( HKEY hKey, LPTSTR lpszSub )
{
BOOL    bRet = TRUE ;
LONG    lRet ;
DWORD   dwSize = MAX_PATH ;
TCHAR   szName[MAX_PATH] ;
TCHAR   szFullKey[MAX_PATH * 2] ;
HKEY    hKeySub = NULL ;
HRESULT hr = NULL ;

do{
    lRet = RegOpenKeyEx( hKey, lpszSub, 0, KEY_ENUMERATE_SUB_KEYS | DELETE, &hKeySub ) ;
    printf("RegOpenKey:: %S :: lRet = %ld\n", lpszSub, lRet) ;
    if( lRet != ERROR_SUCCESS )
    {
        if( lRet == ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND )
        {
            bRet = TRUE ;
            break ;
        }
        else
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }
    }

    while( ERROR_NO_MORE_ITEMS != (lRet = RegEnumKeyEx(hKeySub, 0, szName, &dwSize, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL)) )
    {
        bRet = RcrsvRegDel( hKeySub, szName) ;
        if( bRet == FALSE )
            break ;
    }

    if( hKeySub != NULL )
    {
        RegCloseKey(hKeySub) ;
        hKeySub = NULL ;
    }

    lRet = RegDeleteKey( hKey, lpszSub ) ;
    printf("RegDelKey:: %S :: lRet = %ld\n", lpszSub, lRet) ;
    if( lRet == ERROR_SUCCESS )
    {
        bRet = TRUE ;
        break ;
    }
}while(0) ;
return bRet ;
}

Any idea whats goin on?

UPDATE::

I have also tried the samDesired Parameter with following flags

-KEY_READ

-KEY_READ | KEY_WRITE

-KEY_ENUMERATE_SUB_KEYS

-KEY_ENUMERATE_SUB_KEYS | DELETE

Neither of the above flag works :-(

share|improve this question
1  
What happens if you use the real path to the key, HKLM\Software\Classes\Installer\...? –  Harry Johnston Sep 26 '12 at 2:25
    
@HarryJohnston- I haven't tried that...Lemme try and I will tell you the result. Thank you for the enlightment though :-) –  user1696837 Sep 26 '12 at 5:50
    
@HarryJohnston- Its still the same :-( ERROR 87 –  user1696837 Sep 26 '12 at 6:34
    
Double-check the output to see whether you've already deleted the key that you are unable to open (it might be enumerating twice). List the contents of the branch you're deleting ahead of time and compare it to the output; perhaps some other program is adding and deleting keys at the same time you are. Make sure you're compiling in Unicode. Why are you using two backslashes as the path separator? Why are you recursing to K7RT_RcrsvRegDel instead of to RcrsvRegDel, are they the same function? –  Harry Johnston Sep 26 '12 at 21:24
    
Rather than appending the key names together to make a full path, it would be better to call RcrsvRegDel(hKeySub, szName) to do the recursion. –  Harry Johnston Sep 26 '12 at 21:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do like this. Take the flag as input parameter and pass one flag for the RegOpenKeyEx and again a set of flags when calling the recursive function. I have tried your code and it is working perfectly now, though it is not sure as to what was it that was causing the problem.

static BOOL RcrsvRegDel( HKEY hKey, LPTSTR lpszSub, DWORD dwOpenFlags )
{
    BOOL    bRet = TRUE ;
    LONG    lRet ;
    DWORD   dwSize = MAX_PATH ;
    TCHAR   szName[MAX_PATH] ;
    HKEY    hKeySub = NULL ;
    HRESULT hr = NULL ;
    HANDLE  hProcess = NULL ;
    HANDLE  hToken = NULL ;

    do{
        bRet = SetPrivilege( SE_BACKUP_NAME, TRUE ) ;
        if( bRet == FALSE )
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }

        lRet = RegOpenKeyEx( hKey, lpszSub, 0, dwOpenFlags, &hKeySub ) ;
        if( lRet != ERROR_SUCCESS )
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }

        while( ERROR_NO_MORE_ITEMS != (lRet = RegEnumKeyEx(hKeySub, 0, szName, &dwSize, NULL, 
            NULL, NULL, NULL)) )
            if( !RcrsvRegDel(hKeySub, szName, dwOpenFlags) ) 
            {
                bRet = FALSE ;
                break ;
            }

        lRet = RegDeleteKey( hKey, lpszSub ) ;
        printf("RegDelKey:: %S :: lRet = %ld\n", lpszSub, lRet) ;
        if( lRet != ERROR_SUCCESS )
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }

        if( hKeySub != NULL )
        {
            RegCloseKey(hKeySub) ;
            hKeySub = NULL ;
        }
    }while(0) ;
    return bRet ;
}

static BOOL SetPrivilege( LPCTSTR lpszPrivilege, BOOL bEnablePrivilege ) 
{
    LUID    luid ;
    BOOL    bRet = TRUE ;
    HANDLE  hToken = NULL ;
    HANDLE  hProcess = NULL ;
    TOKEN_PRIVILEGES tp ;

    do{
        hProcess = GetCurrentProcess() ;
        if( 0 == OpenProcessToken(hProcess, TOKEN_ADJUST_PRIVILEGES, &hToken) )
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }

        if( !LookupPrivilegeValue(NULL, lpszPrivilege, &luid) )
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }

        tp.PrivilegeCount = 1 ;
        tp.Privileges[0].Luid = luid ;

        if( bEnablePrivilege )
            tp.Privileges[0].Attributes = SE_PRIVILEGE_ENABLED ;
        else
            tp.Privileges[0].Attributes = 0 ;

        if( !AdjustTokenPrivileges(hToken, FALSE, &tp, sizeof(TOKEN_PRIVILEGES), (PTOKEN_PRIVILEGES)NULL, 
            (PDWORD)NULL) )
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }

        if( ERROR_NOT_ALL_ASSIGNED == GetLastError() )
        {
            bRet = FALSE ;
            break ;
        }
    }while(0) ;
    if( hToken != NULL ) CloseHandle( hToken ) ;
    return bRet ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks Abhineet. That worked perfectly. Thanks a lot man. But why have you used the SetPrivilege function? –  user1696837 Oct 5 '12 at 6:04
1  
You can read about that here:: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…. I generally use that when working with the Registry Tree. Read it on msdn. –  Abhineet Oct 5 '12 at 6:06
    
Ok..thanks a lot :-) –  user1696837 Oct 5 '12 at 6:06

Because you can not use RegDeleteKey with handle was opened with flag KEY_WOW64_32KEY. see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa384129(v=vs.85).aspx for info. You have to use RegDeleteKeyEx with same keys.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry, I am updating the question. actually I have tried with other flags too but to no success :-( –  user1696837 Sep 25 '12 at 10:24
    
I mean - you have to use RegDeleteKeyEx(hKey, lpszSub, KEY_ALL_ACCESS |KEY_WOW64_32KEY) –  Serge Z Sep 25 '12 at 10:35
    
Yeah but my application is 32-bit and I am trying to delete Keys from 32-bit registry tree, so it won't cause any problem. Apart from this, I am trying to access HKCR. Atleast it shouldn't throw error @ RegOpenkeyEx. –  user1696837 Sep 25 '12 at 10:48
    
you are not listening to what Serge is telling you. A key handle that is opened with the KEY_WOW64_32KEY flag, like you are doing, cannot be passed to RegDeleteKey(), it has to be passed to RegDeleteKeyEx() instead. You cannot use KEY_WOW64_32KEY on a non-WOW64 system. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 25 '12 at 18:38

You cannot use RegDeleteKey() to delete a 32-bit key on a 64-bit system. The documentation says as much:

The RegDeleteKey function cannot be used to access an alternate registry view.

You must use RegDeleteKeyEx() instead.

Try something like this:

typedef BOOL (WINAPI *LPFN_ISWOW64PROCESS)(HANDLE, PBOOL);
extern LPFN_ISWOW64PROCESS fnIsWow64Process;

typedef LONG (WINAPI *LPFN_REGDELETEKEYEX)(HKEY, LPCTSTR, REGSAM, DWORD);
extern LPFN_REGDELETEKEYEX fnRegDeleteKeyEx;

.

BOOL WINAPI IsWow64Process_Impl(HANDLE hHandle, PBOOL Wow64Process);
{
    *Wow64Process = FALSE;
    return TRUE;
}

BOOL WINAPI IsWow64Process_Stub(HANDLE hProcess, PBOOL Wow64Process)
{
    fnIsWow64Process = (LPFN_ISWOW64PROCESS) GetProcAddress(GetModuleHandle(TEXT("kernel32")), "IsWow64Process");

    if ( NULL == fnIsWow64Process )
        fnIsWow64Process = &IsWow64Process_Impl;

    return fnIsWow64Process(hProcess, Wow64Process);
}

LONG WINAPI RegDeleteKeyEx_Impl(HKEY hKey, LPCTSTR lpSubKey, REGSAM samDesired, DWORD dwReserved)
{
    return RegDeleteKey( hKey, lpSubKey );
}

LONG WINAPI RegDeleteKeyEx_Stub(HKEY hKey, LPCTSTR lpSubKey, REGSAM samDesired, DWORD dwReserved)
{
    fnRegDeleteKeyEx = (LPFN_REGDELETEKEYEX) GetProcAddress(GetModuleHandle(TEXT("advapi32")),
        #ifdef UNICODE
        "RegDeleteKeyExW"
        #else
        "RegDeleteKeyExA"
        #endif
    );

    if ( NULL == fnRegDeleteKeyEx )
        fnRegDeleteKeyEx = &RegDeleteKeyEx_Impl;

    return fnRegDeleteKeyEx( hKey, lpSubKey, samDesired, dwReserved );
}

LPFN_ISWOW64PROCESS fnIsWow64Process = &IsWow64Process_Stub;
LPFN_REGDELETEKEYEX fnRegDeleteKeyEx = &RegDeleteKeyEx_Stub;

.

BOOL IsWin64()
{
    #if defined(_WIN64)
    return FALSE;  // 64-bit programs run only on Win64
    #elif defined(_WIN32)
    // 32-bit programs run on both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows so must sniff
    BOOL f64 = FALSE;
    return fnIsWow64Process(GetCurrentProcess(), &f64) && f64;
    #else
    return FALSE; // Win64 does not support Win16
    #endif
}

.

static BOOL RcrsvRegDel( HKEY hKey, LPTSTR lpszSub ) 
{ 
    BOOL    bRet = TRUE; 
    LONG    lRet; 
    DWORD   dwSize; 
    TCHAR   szName[MAX_PATH+1]; 
    HKEY    hKeySub = NULL; 

    REGSAM Wow64Flag = (IsWin64()) ? KEY_WOW64_32KEY : 0;

    lRet = RegOpenKeyEx( hKey, lpszSub, 0, KEY_ENUMERATE_SUB_KEYS | KEY_SET_VALUE | DELETE | Wow64Flag, &hKeySub ) ; 
    printf("RegOpenKey:: %S :: lRet = %ld\n", lpszSub, lRet) ; 

    if( lRet != ERROR_SUCCESS ) 
    {
        if ( lRet != ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND )
            bRet = FALSE; 
    }
    else
    {
        do
        {
            dwSize = MAX_PATH;
            lRet = RegEnumKeyEx( hKeySub, 0, szName, &dwSize, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL );

            if ( lRet != ERROR_SUCCESS )
            {
                if ( lRet != ERROR_NO_MORE_ITEMS )
                    bRet = FALSE;

                break;
            }

            bRet = RcrsvRegDel( hKeySub, szName ); 
            if ( !bRet ) 
                break; 
        }
        while (1);

        RegCloseKey(hKeySub); 

        if ( bRet )
        {
            if ( Wow64Flag != 0 )
                lRet = fnRegDeleteKeyEx( hKey, lpszSub, Wow64Flag, 0 );
            else
                lRet = RegDeleteKey( hKey, lpszSub );
            printf("RegDelKey:: %S :: lRet = %ld\n", lpszSub, lRet) ; 

            if ( lRet != ERROR_SUCCESS )
                bRet = FALSE; 
        }
    }

    return bRet;
} 

With that said, consider using RegDeleteTree() or SHDeleteKey() instead. Let them do the recursion for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the effort you have shown and the code above is really so smooth but still my problem is OPENING the key. Let me make myself more clear if the question is not so obvious:: –  user1696837 Sep 26 '12 at 6:32
    
1. Why RegOpenKeyEx is failing with ERROR 87 even with a simple flag of KEY_READ or KEY_ENUMERATE_SUB_KEYS. 2. As the documentation @ MSDN says, "By default, a 32-bit application running on WOW64 accesses the 32-bit registry view and a 64-bit application accesses the 64-bit registry view.", So, I am not trying to access any alternate registry as my application is 32-bit, I have mentioned the flag to be super-precautious. 3. The code works fine for x86 and x64 with VISTA or WIN 7, so i dont think using RegDeleteKey would be causing any problem here. –  user1696837 Sep 26 '12 at 6:32
    
Please do correct me if my understanding is wrong. –  user1696837 Sep 26 '12 at 6:33
    
Without seeing your code that is calling RcrsvRegDel(), it is hard to diagnose why RegOpenKeyEx() is failing. Chances are that either hKey or lpszSub really do contain invalid values. Make sure you are also not trying to access a key that is virtualized under WOW64, that might also be playing a factor. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 26 '12 at 18:25
1  
@user1696837: you really should have mentioned when you first asked the question that the error code was coming from the RegOpenKeyEx call rather than the RegDeleteKey call. We've been wasting our time trying to solve a problem you didn't have instead of the one you did. –  Harry Johnston Sep 26 '12 at 20:57

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