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I'm somehow new to templates and I'm trying to modify some library that provide matrix and vector operation to c++, i have a vector class which I'm trying to overload the operator() for it to handle an operation like this Vector(2:5) will return a vector that has elements 2,3,4,5 of the original vector, and I'm using a class called colon where colon(2:5) will represent the (2:5) effect as i found that c++ has no operator: . hope i gave a proper introduction. The relevant code is as follows

The Vector Class

template< size_t M, typename T = float >
class Vector
{
public:
typedef T   value_type;
Vector operator-( const Vector& other ) const;
template <size_t N, typename T> Vector<N,T> operator()(const  colon &cex) const;
.
.
}

and the corresponding implementation

template< size_t M, typename T >
template< size_t N,T>
Vector<N,T>
Vector<M,T>::operator()( const colon &cex ) const
{
long i, ii, st = 0, in = 0, en = 0, s;
cex.apply(M, st, in, en, s);
if (s && (st>0) && (st>M))
{
Vector<N,T> result;
for (i=st,ii=0;i+=in,ii++;i<=en,ii<N)
{
result(ii)=array(i);
return result;
}

}
return 0;
}

the return 0 here is just a place holder, it should return an empty vector. the colon class (which is taken from another library and modified by me).

class colon
{
public:
/// Colon expression '(:)'
colon() { _flag = 'a'; }
/// Colon expression of type '(2:5)'
colon(long s, long e) { _s = s; _i = 1; _e = e; _flag = 'r'; }
void apply(long s, long &f, long &i, long &l, long &n) const;

private:
/// Type of colon expression.
char _flag;
/// First index.
long _s;
/// Increment.
long _i;
/// Last index.
long _e;

}; /* class colon */

and the relevant implementation is

void
colon::apply(long n, long &st, long &in, long &en,
     long &le) const
{
switch (_flag)
{
    case 'r':
        if ((_i == 0 ) || ((_e - _s) / _i < 0 )) le = 0;
        else
        {
            st = _s;
            in = _i;
            en = _e - (_e - _s) % _i;
            le = (_e - _s) / _i + 1;
        }
        break;
    case 'a':
        if (n)
        {
            st = 1;
            in = 1;
            en = n;
            le = n;
        }
        else le = 0;
        break;

 }
}

when compiling this code i always receive the error

Error 1 error C2244: 'Vector::operator ()' : unable to match function definition to an existing declaration

and the output of the compiler is

error C2244: 'Vector<M,T>::operator ()' : unable to match function 
definition to an existing declaration

definition
'Vector<N,T> Vector<M,T>::operator ()(const colon &) const'

existing declarations
'Vector<N,T> Vector<M,T>::operator ()(const colon &) const'

So What I'm doing wrong here?

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1  
Note that the size for your new vector (your N) will never be deduced - how could it? And you could never get a template argument out of runtime parameters. I think you need to rethink your design. –  Xeo Sep 25 '12 at 10:19
1  
To go further with @Xeo: If the vector size is a compile-time constant, then the colon range must be compile-time to for this to work. You can however define a run-time sized Vector class, that will be returned as the result of a run-time sized colon operation. As soon as the result of a function depends on run-time values it cannot be defined at compile-time. –  Nobody Sep 25 '12 at 10:49
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your declaration you write:

template< size_t M, typename T = float >
class Vector
{
template <size_t N, typename T> 
Vector<N,T> operator()(const  colon &cex) const

and in your definition you write:

template< size_t M, typename T >
template< size_t N,T>
Vector<N,T>
Vector<M,T>::operator()( const colon &cex ) const

Notice the difference in the second template line:

template <size_t N, typename T> 

vs.

template< size_t N,T>

You are missing the typename there. So instead of passing a type to T you expect to get passed an instance of T (which is only possible if T is an integral type).

This shows that your declaration and definition do in fact differ and where the error originates from.

As your second T would hide the first (which is not allowed - see comments), I think you either want to rename the second Tand add the typename in the definition or you want to remove the second T altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd opt for removing the second T, since the new vector type obviously has to be the same. Also, you are not allowed by the standard to shadow template parameters. –  Xeo Sep 25 '12 at 10:15
    
@Xeo: There could be the possibility, that the OP wants to have some type interoperability, but probably he can remove the template from the function altogether, but I do not know exactly what he wants to achieve. –  Nobody Sep 25 '12 at 10:17
    
Just for completeness I will list one answer to the shadowing problem that cites the standard. –  Nobody Sep 25 '12 at 10:27
    
Removing the second T doesn't solve the problem and the same error appears, renaming it solve the error, but now it doesn't see the function when i try to use it, and gives the error codeError 10 error C2664: 'const double &Vector<M,T>::operator ()(size_t) const' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'colon' to 'size_t' c:\source\maskrepair\commonmodules\mathsupport\tester\tester.cpp 67 it only see another overloaded function –  Salama Sep 25 '12 at 10:41
    
Did you remove T in both (declaration and definition) of operator()? –  Nobody Sep 25 '12 at 10:43
show 2 more comments

First problem is that you write template function arguments wrong: template<size_t N,T>. It shall be template<size_t N, typename T>, otherwise it will be considered as non-type template parameter (some specific value of T).

Second problem is that function template parameter name T is ambiguos. Compiler could not know which T it shall use, from class template parameter or from function one? Remember, function and class template parameters are unrelated. So you need to rename it:

template<size_t M, typename T> class Vector
{
public:

template <size_t N, typename X> Vector<N,X> operator()() const;
};

template<size_t M, typename T>
template<size_t N, typename X> Vector<N,X> Vector<M,T>::operator()() const
{ 
}

But actually if you don't need cross-type operations and X will be always the same type as T you could just skip it in function and parametrize it only by size:

template<size_t M, typename T> class Vector
{
public:

template <size_t N> Vector<N,T> operator()() const;
};

template<size_t M, typename T>
template<size_t N> Vector<N,T> Vector<M,T>::operator()() const
{ 
}
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