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Do you know if there is a way to get python's random.sample to work with a generator object. I am trying to get a random sample from a very large text corpus. The problem is that random.sample() raises the following error.

TypeError: object of type 'generator' has no len()

I was thinking that maybe there is some way of doing this with something from itertools but couldn't find anything with a bit of searching.

A somewhat made up example:

import random
def list_item(ls):
    for item in ls:
        yield item

random.sample( list_item(range(100)), 20 )


UPDATE


As per MartinPieters's request I did some timing of the currently proposed three methods. The results are as follows.

Sampling 1000 from 10000
Using iterSample 0.0163 s
Using sample_from_iterable 0.0098 s
Using iter_sample_fast 0.0148 s

Sampling 10000 from 100000
Using iterSample 0.1786 s
Using sample_from_iterable 0.1320 s
Using iter_sample_fast 0.1576 s

Sampling 100000 from 1000000
Using iterSample 3.2740 s
Using sample_from_iterable 1.9860 s
Using iter_sample_fast 1.4586 s

Sampling 200000 from 1000000
Using iterSample 7.6115 s
Using sample_from_iterable 3.0663 s
Using iter_sample_fast 1.4101 s

Sampling 500000 from 1000000
Using iterSample 39.2595 s
Using sample_from_iterable 4.9994 s
Using iter_sample_fast 1.2178 s

Sampling 2000000 from 5000000
Using iterSample 798.8016 s
Using sample_from_iterable 28.6618 s
Using iter_sample_fast 6.6482 s

So it turns out that the array.insert has a serious drawback when it comes to large sample sizes. The code I used to time the methods

from heapq import nlargest
import random
import timeit


def iterSample(iterable, samplesize):
    results = []
    for i, v in enumerate(iterable):
        r = random.randint(0, i)
        if r < samplesize:
            if i < samplesize:
                results.insert(r, v) # add first samplesize items in random order
            else:
                results[r] = v # at a decreasing rate, replace random items

    if len(results) < samplesize:
        raise ValueError("Sample larger than population.")

    return results

def sample_from_iterable(iterable, samplesize):
    return (x for _, x in nlargest(samplesize, ((random.random(), x) for x in iterable)))

def iter_sample_fast(iterable, samplesize):
    results = []
    iterator = iter(iterable)
    # Fill in the first samplesize elements:
    for _ in xrange(samplesize):
        results.append(iterator.next())
    random.shuffle(results)  # Randomize their positions
    for i, v in enumerate(iterator, samplesize):
        r = random.randint(0, i)
        if r < samplesize:
            results[r] = v  # at a decreasing rate, replace random items

    if len(results) < samplesize:
        raise ValueError("Sample larger than population.")
    return results

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pop_sizes = [int(10e+3),int(10e+4),int(10e+5),int(10e+5),int(10e+5),int(10e+5)*5]
    k_sizes = [int(10e+2),int(10e+3),int(10e+4),int(10e+4)*2,int(10e+4)*5,int(10e+5)*2]

    for pop_size, k_size in zip(pop_sizes, k_sizes):
        pop = xrange(pop_size)
        k = k_size
        t1 = timeit.Timer(stmt='iterSample(pop, %i)'%(k_size), setup='from __main__ import iterSample,pop')
        t2 = timeit.Timer(stmt='sample_from_iterable(pop, %i)'%(k_size), setup='from __main__ import sample_from_iterable,pop')
        t3 = timeit.Timer(stmt='iter_sample_fast(pop, %i)'%(k_size), setup='from __main__ import iter_sample_fast,pop')

        print 'Sampling', k, 'from', pop_size
        print 'Using iterSample', '%1.4f s'%(t1.timeit(number=100) / 100.0)
        print 'Using sample_from_iterable', '%1.4f s'%(t2.timeit(number=100) / 100.0)
        print 'Using iter_sample_fast', '%1.4f s'%(t3.timeit(number=100) / 100.0)
        print ''

I also ran a test to check that all the methods indeed do take an unbiased sample of the generator. So for all methods I sampled 1000 elements from 10000 100000 times and computed the average frequency of occurrence of each item in the population which turns out to be ~.1 as one would expect for all three methods.

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried random.sample(list(gen), 20) -- it might not be too slow! –  katrielalex Sep 25 '12 at 10:54
    
What exactly are you sampling from the corpus? Is there any way to represent it as something else than a generator? –  larsmans Sep 25 '12 at 10:56
    
@larsmans words and sentences - I am trying to keep the memory consumption down with using the generator object. –  Matti Lyra Sep 25 '12 at 10:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

While the answer of Martijn Pieters is correct, it does slow down when samplesize becomes large, because using list.insert in a loop may have quadratic complexity.

Here's an alternative that, in my opinion, preserves the uniformity while increasing performance:

def iter_sample_fast(iterable, samplesize):
    results = []
    iterator = iter(iterable)
    # Fill in the first samplesize elements:
    try:
        for _ in xrange(samplesize):
            results.append(iterator.next())
    except StopIteration:
        raise ValueError("Sample larger than population.")
    random.shuffle(results)  # Randomize their positions
    for i, v in enumerate(iterator, samplesize):
        r = random.randint(0, i)
        if r < samplesize:
            results[r] = v  # at a decreasing rate, replace random items
    return results

The difference slowly starts to show for samplesize values above 10000. Times for calling with (1000000, 100000):

  • iterSample: 5.05s
  • iter_sample_fast: 2.64s
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't to check for samplesize be after the array has been filled in the first for loop to finish early if samplesize if bigger than the iterator? –  Matti Lyra Sep 26 '12 at 8:03
    
I don't have to, because iterator will raise StopIteration if depleted before results list is filled. I modified the code a bit to clarify this. –  DzinX Sep 26 '12 at 8:36
    
list.insert has linear complexity, not quadratic, but +1. –  larsmans Sep 26 '12 at 9:15
2  
+1 for this update to the algorithm. I was the original author of iterSample (in the earlier answer that MartijnPieters linked) and while the complexity issues with the initialization code using list.insert had occurred to me, I never got around to fixing it myself. –  Blckknght Sep 27 '12 at 8:22
1  
@larsmans: Python's random.sample returns shuffled results (from docs: "The resulting list is in selection order so that all sub-slices will also be valid random samples.") If you don't need the results to be shuffled (e.g. for len(iterable) == samplesize they will be in the exact order they came in), then you can skip the initial shuffling. –  DzinX Feb 20 '13 at 8:10

You can't.

You have two options: read the whole generator into a list, then sample from that list, or use a method that reads the generator one by one and picks the sample from that:

import random

def iterSample(iterable, samplesize):
    results = []

    for i, v in enumerate(iterable):
        r = random.randint(0, i)
        if r < samplesize:
            if i < samplesize:
                results.insert(r, v) # add first samplesize items in random order
            else:
                results[r] = v # at a decreasing rate, replace random items

    if len(results) < samplesize:
        raise ValueError("Sample larger than population.")

    return results

This method adjusts the chance that the next item is part of the sample based on the number of items in the iterable so far. It doesn't need to hold more than samplesize items in memory.

The solution isn't mine; it was provided as part of another answer here on SO.

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid that might be the case, seems like something that should be in the standard lib though. –  Matti Lyra Sep 25 '12 at 10:58
    
@MattiLyra: Feel free to propose it's addition to the stdlib. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 25 '12 at 10:59
1  
So just to check that I understand the logic of the code. It is a uniform sample from the entire generator, because the items are replaced in the result set if samplesize is reached before the end of the generator, allowing the later items a chance to be selected? –  Matti Lyra Sep 25 '12 at 11:08
    
@MattiLyra: Correct. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 25 '12 at 11:10
1  
@MattiLyra: There is no additional cost for adding items to python lists when they are large. See Python Time Complexity; appending is O(1) constant cost. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 25 '12 at 12:44

Just for the heck of it, here's a one-liner that samples k elements without replacement from the n items generated in O(n lg k) time:

from heapq import nlargest

def sample_from_iterable(it, k):
    return (x for _, x in nlargest(k, ((random.random(), x) for x in it)))
share|improve this answer
    
so you give a random key to each element in it when you pass it to to the heap? –  Matti Lyra Sep 25 '12 at 12:33
    
@MattiLyra: yep. It would be even easier to pass key=random.random() to nlargest, but I'm afraid that would break the heap invariants. This does suppose that your values are comparable in the case of ties between the random keys. –  larsmans Sep 25 '12 at 12:41
    
@MartijnPieters: it does since 2.6. If you were looking at the heapq.py source code, then scroll down, as nlargest is redefined at the end of the file. –  larsmans Sep 25 '12 at 13:02
    
@larsmans: Damn, I forgot about the redefined versions.. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 25 '12 at 13:03
    
If you were to use key the distribution would not be properly random. For any value in the iterable where random.random() produced the exact same float, the first of the two values of the iterable would always be chosen (because nlargest(.., key) uses (key(value), [decreasing counter starting at 0], value) tuples). In your method the larger of the two values would be preferred in that case. So in both methods there is an (ever so) slight bias. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 26 '12 at 8:46

If the number of items in the iterator is known (by elsewhere counting the items), another approach is:

def iter_sample(iterable, iterlen, samplesize):
    if iterlen < samplesize:
        raise ValueError("Sample larger than population.")
    indexes = set()
    while len(indexes) < samplesize:
        indexes.add(random.randint(0,iterlen))
    indexesiter = iter(sorted(indexes))
    current = indexesiter.next()
    ret = []
    for i, item in enumerate(iterable):
        if i == current:
            ret.append(item)
            try:
                current = indexesiter.next()
            except StopIteration:
                break
    random.shuffle(ret)
    return ret

I find this quicker, especially when sampsize is small in relation to iterlen. When the whole, or near to the whole, sample is asked for however, there are issues.

iter_sample (iterlen=10000, samplesize=100) time: (1, 'ms') iter_sample_fast (iterlen=10000, samplesize=100) time: (15, 'ms')

iter_sample (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=100) time: (65, 'ms') iter_sample_fast (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=100) time: (1477, 'ms')

iter_sample (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=1000) time: (64, 'ms') iter_sample_fast (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=1000) time: (1459, 'ms')

iter_sample (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=10000) time: (86, 'ms') iter_sample_fast (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=10000) time: (1480, 'ms')

iter_sample (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=100000) time: (388, 'ms') iter_sample_fast (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=100000) time: (1521, 'ms')

iter_sample (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=1000000) time: (25359, 'ms') iter_sample_fast (iterlen=1000000, samplesize=1000000) time: (2178, 'ms')

share|improve this answer

Fastest method until proven otherwise when you have an idea about how long the generator is (and will be asymptotically uniformly distributed):

def gen_sample(generator_list, sample_size, iterlen):
    num = 0
    inds = numpy.random.random(iterlen) <= (sample_size * 1.0 / iterlen)
    results = []
    iterator = iter(generator_list)
    gotten = 0
    while gotten < sample_size: 
        try:
            b = iterator.next()
            if inds[num]: 
                results.append(b)
                gotten += 1
            num += 1    
        except: 
            num = 0
            iterator = iter(generator_list)
            inds = numpy.random.random(iterlen) <= ((sample_size - gotten) * 1.0 / iterlen)
    return results

It is both the fastest on the small iterable as well as the huge iterable (and probably all in between then)

# Huge
res = gen_sample(xrange(5000000), 200000, 5000000)
timing: 1.22s

# Small
z = gen_sample(xrange(10000), 1000, 10000) 
timing: 0.000441    
share|improve this answer
    
What is the except supposed to catch. The end of one iterator? –  Matti Lyra Nov 7 at 14:13

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