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In Perl, is it possible to pass a constant to a function and then display the name of the constant literally as well as use its value? Maybe by passing some kind of escaped constant name to the function?

Here is an example of what I would like to do, of course the code in exitError() yet doesn't do what I want to do.

use constant MAIL_SEND_FAILED => 1;

# exitError($exitcode)
sub exitError
{
    my $exitCode = $_[0];
    say "error, exitcode: $exitCode"; # output constant name as human readable exitcode, e.g. MAIL_SEND_FAILED
    exit $exitCode; # use value of exitcode, e.g. 1
}

exitError(MAIL_SEND_FAILED);
# function call should effectively execute this code
# say "error, exitcode: MAIL_SEND_FAILED";
# exit 1;
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As far as I know, Perl optimizes away the constants, constant expressions. In this case, why not use a hash? Keys like MAIL_SEND_FAILED, values of 0 or 1. –  librarian Sep 25 '12 at 11:12
    
Ah, thanks, using a hash is a really good idea! I also guess that PErl optimizes it away, but as it is a scripting language, maybe it's not completely removing them? But anyway, will now use a hash, really good idea! –  stefan.at.wpf Sep 25 '12 at 11:14
1  
Perl is not a scripting language (Scripting languages are associated historically with batch programs and job control language (JCL). As such, they are not 'true' programs, but 'mere' shells or shoehorns by which the actual programs are run. - Wikipedia). Perl is a programming language. –  librarian Sep 25 '12 at 11:16
    
since you mention being new to Perl, I'll point out that my $exitCode = $_[0]; is not a typical way of reading arguments. While still valid, my $exitCode = shift; or my ($exitCode) = @_; are what others would be expecting to see –  plusplus Sep 26 '12 at 9:20

3 Answers 3

Not exactly the way you want, but to the same effect, you can use Perl's ability to store different string and number representation in single scalar with dualvar from Scalar::Util:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';
use Scalar::Util qw(dualvar);

use constant MAIL_SEND_FAILED => dualvar 1, 'MAIL_SEND_FAILED';

sub exitError
{
    my $exitCode = $_[0];
    say "error, exitcode: $exitCode"; # output constant name as human readable exitcode, e.g. MAIL_SEND_FAILED
    exit $exitCode; # use value of exitcode, e.g. 1
}

exitError(MAIL_SEND_FAILED);

Closer to your original idea, you can exploit fact that constants are actually inlined subs and find original sub by name with can from UNIVERSAL:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';
use Scalar::Util qw(dualvar);

use constant MAIL_SEND_FAILED => 2;

sub exitError
{
    my $exitCode = $_[0];
    say "error, exitcode: $exitCode"; # output constant name as human readable exitcode, e.g. MAIL_SEND_FAILED
    exit __PACKAGE__->can($exitCode)->(); # use value of exitcode, e.g. 1
}

exitError('MAIL_SEND_FAILED');

However, IIRC Perl doesn't guarantee that constants will always be generated that way, so this may break at later date.

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Thanks Oleg, guess I will now change to dualvar :P One question though, how does Perl know that after "exit" there has to follow a number and not a string? I am new to Perl, as far as I have seen, when writing a subroutine one doesn't directly define datatypes for parameters? –  stefan.at.wpf Sep 25 '12 at 11:24
    
@stefan.at.wpf, it is not Perl itself, but rather function exit that needs a number, so Perl gives it exactly that. –  Oleg V. Volkov Sep 25 '12 at 11:26
    
I don't understand that, does exit get passed in the dualvar instead of the number? But then I can't imagine at which time it is casted to integer, as exit probably won't do any math with the errorcode, so it's not clear from the context if it's a number or not? –  stefan.at.wpf Sep 25 '12 at 11:30
    
@stefan.at.wpf, yes, exit and any other place where you'd use this constant gets entire dualvar scalar with both values inside. Eventually Perl wrapper called exit needs to get value to pass to real C exit function that it wraps. It uses internal Perl method "give me a native number associated with this scalar" and retrieves that part. –  Oleg V. Volkov Sep 25 '12 at 11:33

If you want to use something's name and its value, a hash is what you are looking for. You might even have a constant hash with Readonly.

share|improve this answer
use constant MAIL_SEND_FAILED => 1;

sub exitError
{
   my %data = @_;
   # Keys are names and values are values....
}

exitError(MAIL_SEND_FAILED => MAIL_SEND_FAILED);
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