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I thought the point of a singleton was I could only initialize one instance at a time? If this is correct, then I must have a fault in my C# console application code (see below).

Would some one please be kind enough to inform me if my understanding of a singleton is correct or if there is an error in my code.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace TestSingleton
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Singleton t = Singleton.Instance;
            t.MyProperty = "Hi";

            Singleton t2 = Singleton.Instance;
            t2.MyProperty = "Hello";

            if (t.MyProperty != "")
                Console.WriteLine("No");

            if (t2.MyProperty != "")
                Console.WriteLine("No 2");

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    public sealed class Singleton
    {
        private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();

        public string MyProperty { get; set; }

        private Singleton()
        {}

        static Singleton()
        { }

        public static Singleton Instance { get { return instance; } }
    }
}
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1  
And there no need to assign the instance to a local variable, with a singleton just use it directly. –  Dale Burrell Sep 25 '12 at 11:08
1  
The problem is in your test. –  John Watts Sep 25 '12 at 11:08
    
What you feel fault in your code? –  Cuong Le Sep 25 '12 at 11:09
    
to see what is going on put a breakpoint in your singleton constructor - or a console.writeline, you are only getting one instance –  dice Sep 25 '12 at 11:09
1  
If you would show the output, it would be helpful to see what happens. –  Tim Schmelter Sep 25 '12 at 11:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Infact you have only one instance here. You get 2 pointers

Singleton t = Singleton.Instance; //FIRST POINTER
t.MyProperty = "Hi";

Singleton t2 = Singleton.Instance; //SECOND POINTER
t2.MyProperty = "Hello";

But they both are pointing to the same memory location.

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1  
I second that. +1 –  Fildor Sep 25 '12 at 11:07
    
Ah... Now I understand. Because it's a reference type right!? –  Dave Sep 25 '12 at 11:07
    
You didn't make 2 sinatnces of the class, but make only one, just point to the same instance from 2 different locations. –  Tigran Sep 25 '12 at 11:08
    
@Dave what made you think you have two ones in the first place? Of course neither "Hi" nor "Hello" is == "" ... –  Fildor Sep 25 '12 at 11:09
    
@DaveRook: correct, cause it's a reference type. In general you can avoid all that ctor code, if you declare class simply static. You guranteed in this way that none can create non static instance of it. –  Tigran Sep 25 '12 at 11:09

Try

Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", t.MyProperty, t2.MyProperty);

Just tested your code and it gives Hello Hello and not Hi Hello. So you were manipulating the same instance

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Actually you have only one instance in your sample program. The variables t1 and t2 point to the very same instance of the object. The object you created is

private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();

And both t1 and t2 point to the same object. As said by someone else in memory there is just one object created.

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Your reference to Singleton.Instance; is a reference to Singleton.instance and so a reffence to one single object. There is no creation of a second Singleton object

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