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I try to understand how double dispatch works. I created an example where a monster and a warrior derived from the abstract class Creature could fight. The class Creature has method "fight", which is defined in derived classes, and in each derived class is defined what happens if warrior fights with warrior or with monster etc. I wrote the following code:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class Monster;
class Warrior;

class Creature{
public:
    virtual void fight(Creature&) =0;
};

class Monster: public Creature{
    void fightwho(Warrior& w) {cout<<"Monster versus Warrior"<<endl; }
    void fightwho(Monster& m) {cout<<"Monster versus Monster"<<endl; }
public:
    void fight(Creature& c)  {c.fightwho(*this);}
};

class Warrior: public Creature{
    void fightwho(Warrior& w) {cout<<"Warrior versus Warrior"<<endl; }
    void fightwho(Monster& m) {cout<<"Monster versus Warrior"<<endl; }
public:
    void fight(Creature& c) {c.fightwho(*this);}
};

int main()
{
Warrior w;
Monster m;
w.fight(m);
}

This results in compiler error, which I foresee:

ex12_10.cpp: In member function ‘virtual void Monster::fight(Creature&)’: ex12_10.cpp:17:30: error: ‘class Creature’ has no member named ‘fightwho’

ex12_10.cpp: In member function ‘virtual void Warrior::fight(Creature&)’: ex12_10.cpp:24:29: error: ‘class Creature’ has no member named ‘fightwho’

But I don't know how to proceed from here... Please help.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, obviously, you really don't have fightwho declared in your Creature class, so you need to declare it there, and declare it as virtual.

Double dispatch works in a way that for call (this assumes Warrior& w = ..., not Warrior w):

w.fight(m);

First the virtual mechanism will chose Warrior::fight instead of Monster::fight and then the overloading mechanism will pick Monster::fightwho(Warrior& m) instead of Warrior::fightwho(Warrior& m). Note that it would make more sense if you would have:

Warrior w;
Monster m;
Creature& c1 = w;
Creature& c2 = m;
c1.fight(c2); // not w.fight(m)

Therefore, the method which will eventually be called will be dispatched according to type of the object on which you call it and type of the object sent as argument, i.e. double dispatch

Additionally, please note that this might not be the best example as your types are members of the same hierarchy. Visitor design pattern is a good example of double dispatch implementations in languages which don't support it as first class citizens (i.e. C++ and derivatives: Java, C#...)

As @CrazyCasta correctly notes, when your class hierarchy starts to grow, this approach becomes much harder to maintain and can result in explosion of number of methods, so choose carefully...

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When I added this line to class Creature: virtual void fightwho(Creature&);, I got /tmp/cceFWViM.o: In function Creature::Creature()': ex12_10.cpp:(.text._ZN8CreatureC2Ev[_ZN8CreatureC5Ev]+0xf): undefined reference to vtable for Creature' /tmp/cceFWViM.o:(.rodata._ZTV7Warrior[vtable for Warrior]+0x18): undefined reference to Creature::fightwho(Creature&)' /tmp/cceFWViM.o:(.rodata._ZTV7Monster[vtable for Monster]+0x18): undefined reference to Creature::fightwho(Creature&)' /tmp/cceFWViM.o:(.rodata._ZTI7Warrior[typeinfo for Warrior]+0x10): undefined reference to `typeinfo for Creatur –  gartenzwerg Sep 25 '12 at 11:39
    
you need to declare it as pure virtual or provide the body. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 25 '12 at 11:42
    
it works if I add to Creature "virtual void fightwho(Warrior&)=0; virtual void fightwho(Monster&)=0;". But Is it possible to implement without naming Monster and Warrior in Creature? If I add "virtual void fightwho(Creature&)=0;" it does not work –  gartenzwerg Sep 25 '12 at 11:47
2  
No, it is not possible, you need fightwho(Warrior&) and fightwho(Monster&) in Creature, hence why this can get very nasty very quickly. –  CrazyCasta Sep 25 '12 at 11:50
    
@CrazyCasta you are right, of course. I noticed missing =0 and ignored the argument the completely –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 25 '12 at 11:52

If you want to do this you will need to use RTTI. You will need to check the type of the thing being passed in. In general this is not the best design pattern to be used if you can avoid it. If you want to interact two objects you generally want to use the standard interface of another. For instance you might say creature.attack(other_creature) and attack might query the defense of the other creature, and based on that and it's own stats post an hp update to the other_creature.

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The point of double dispatch is to avoid explicit type selection based on RTTI. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 25 '12 at 11:47
    
Your method requires an abstract function in the base class for every type of class you want to interact with (most likely, every type that derives from the base class). That gets very ugly very quickly. –  CrazyCasta Sep 25 '12 at 11:52
    
I completely agree - and that's why I am not particularly fond of Visitor pattern, especially when hierarchy starts to grow - it quickly turns into a mess. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 25 '12 at 11:55
    
I have also edited my answer to stress the point you raised. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 25 '12 at 11:57
1  
I am not aware of better options for double dispatch in C++ (and derived languages) as you need to supply all combinations explicitly. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 25 '12 at 12:03

My contribution to above answers is providing well-tested example in order to clarify double dispatch concept in reality. If you review the below code you will find the answer of how can I implement by myself.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cassert>
#include <cstring> 
#include <time.h>
#include <string.h>

using namespace std;

class A;
class A1;
class A2;

class B {
    public:
        // dispatcher function to A
        virtual void collide(const A& a) const = 0;

        // actual collision logic B with types of A
        virtual void collide(const A1& a) const = 0;
        virtual void collide(const A2& a) const = 0;
};

class A {
    public:
        // dispatcher function to B
        virtual void collide(const B& b) const = 0;

        // actual collision logic A with types of B
        virtual void collide(const B1& b) const = 0;
        virtual void collide(const B2& b) const = 0;
};

class A1 : public A {
    public:
        void collide(const B& b) const {
            // dispatch to b
            b.collide(*this);
        }
        void collide(const B1& b) const {
            cout << "collision with B1 and A1" << endl;
        }
        void collide(const B2& b) const {
            cout << "collision with B2 and A1" << endl;
        }
};

class A2 : public A {
    public:
        void collide(const B& b) const {
            // dispatch to a
            b.collide(*this);
        }
        void collide(const B1& b) const {
            cout << "collision with B1 and A2" << endl;
        }
        void collide(const B2& b) const {
            cout << "collision with B2 and A2" << endl;
        }
};

class B1 : public B {
    public:
        void collide(const A& b) const {
            b.collide(*this);
        }
        void collide(const A1& b) const {
            cout << "collision with A1 Bnd B1" << endl;
        }
        void collide(const A2& b) const {
            cout << "collision with A2 Bnd B1" << endl;
        }
};

class B2 : public B {
    public:
        void collide(const A& a) const {
            a.collide(*this);
        }
        void collide(const A1& a) const {
            cout << "collision with A1 Bnd B2" << endl;
        }
        void collide(const A2& a) const {
            cout << "collision with A2 Bnd B2" << endl;
        }
};

int main() {

    A* a = new A1();
    B* b = new B2();

    // first dispatch is done by polymorphism ( a is resolved as a A1 )
    // second dispatch is done in collide function by the function overloading
    // ( in collide function we are sending A1 to collide function of B )
    a->collide(*b);

}
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